Sean Kingston Publishing

http://www.seankingston.co.uk/publishing.html

About

In a field of multinational corporations, Sean Kingston Publishing is a family business, a small press specializing in high-quality academic texts within the social sciences, particularly anthropology. We published our first books in 2004, volumes by Marilyn Strathern, James Leach and Lawrence Kalinoe, and Alan Rumsey and James Weiner. Since that time, we have grown organically, establishing many long-lasting relationships with our partners (e.g. the Royal Anthropological Institute and the Centro Incontri Umani) and authors, and publishing more books each year.
Dr Sean Kingston is a published and prize-winning anthropologist, and is personally involved in all books accepted for publication. He assesses every title himself, and each book is also submitted to peer review by experts on the topic. You will find him and our books at many anthropology conferences in Europe, and sometimes further afield. We have business relationships with some of the largest book distributors, and through them access the latest print-on-demand (POD) technology to print and market from the UK, the US and Australia.
We are delighted to announce a new series of Open Access publications, from October 2017, free to all and available from a number repositories and, of course, from our own website.
We are keen to consider further proposals for Open Access publications. We shall generally offer this on a Gold Standard basis, under a Creative Commons Attribution v4.0 International License (CC BY), the most open license available, allowing readers to copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format, and to alter, transform, or build upon the material, including for commercial use, providing the original author is credited. In addition, for those who prefer print, a paperback edition (rather than our usual and significantly more expensive hardback) will be available to purchase through all our usual channels. All projects vary, so please contact us for enquiries

Peer review info

Sean Kingston Publishing specializes in anthropology books of high academic quality. At proposal stage, this is assessed by an experienced internal team; though if a proposal is for a specific book series, the series editor or Learned Society involved will also assess it. Once a manuscript is received, this is subjected to a blind review by two, sometimes three, expert external reviewers. Unlike many presses, SKP allows authors to identify anybody in the field they would prefer to avoid as a peer reviewer.
See www.seankingston.co.uk/pubframe.html#AboutSKP

License info

Creative Commons Attribution v4.0 International License (CC BY)
or
Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial Non-derivative 4.0 International license (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0).
http://www.seankingston.co.uk/Open%20Access.html


Browse results: Found 2

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Pilgrimage and Ambiguity: Sharing the Sacred

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
ISBN: 9781907774997 Year: Pages: viii, 242 DOI: 10.26581/B.HOZA01 Language: English
Publisher: Sean Kingston Publishing Grant: The Centro Incontri Umani, Ascona
Subject: Ethnology --- Religion
Added to DOAB on : 2018-04-19 17:11:24
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‘Ambiguous sanctuaries’ are places in which the sacred is shared. These exist in almost all religions: tombs of saints, mausoleums, monasteries and shrines, a revered mountain peak, a majestic tree, a cave or special boulders in the river. This book examines this phenomenon in diverse parts of the world: in Europe, the Middle East, Asia and Brazil. What these ritual spaces share is the capacity to unsettle and challenge people’s experiences and understandings of reality, as well as to provoke the imagination, allowing universes of meanings to be interlinked. The spaces discussed reveal the many different ways the sacred can be shared. Different groups may once have visited sites that are nowadays linked to only one religion. The legacy of earlier religious movements is subtly echoed in the devotional forms, rituals, symbols or narratives (hagiographies) of the present, and the architectural settings in which they take place. In some pilgrimage sites, peoples of different faiths visit and take part in devotional acts and rituals – such as processing, offering candles, incenses and flowers – that are shared. The saints to whom a shrine is dedicated can also have a double identity. Such ambiguity has often been viewed through the lens of religious purity, and the exclusivity of orthodoxy, as confusion, showing a lack of coherence and authenticity. But the openness to interpretation of sacred spaces in this collection suggests a more positive analysis: that it may be through ambiguity transcending narrow confines that pilgrims experience the sanctity and power they seek. In the engaging and accessible essays that comprise Pilgrimage and Ambiguity the contributors consider the ambiguous forces that cohere in sacred spaces - forces that move us into the inspirational depths of human spirituality. In so doing, the essays bring us closer to a deeper appreciation of how ambiguity helps to define the human condition. This collection is one that will be read and debated for many years to come. Paul Stoller, West Chester University, Pennsylvania,2013 Anders Retzius Gold Medal Laureate in Anthropology In a time of religious polarization, this fine collection of essays recalls that ambiguity, ambivalence and shared experience characterize the sacred as it is encountered in pilgrimages. Readers will travel through the Mediterranean, India, Pakistan and China, but also Western Europe and Amazonia, to discover saintly landscapes full of multiple meanings. Alexandre Papas, Senior Research Fellow, National Centre for Scientific Research, Paris

State, Resistance, Transformation: Anthropological Perspectives on the Dynamics of Power in Contemporary Global Realities

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
ISBN: 9781907774508 Year: Pages: viii, 362 DOI: 10.26581/B.KAPF01 Language: English
Publisher: Sean Kingston Publishing Grant: University of Bergen
Subject: Ethnology --- Political Science
Added to DOAB on : 2018-04-19 17:33:33
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The territorially sovereign nation-state – the globally dominant political formation of Western modernity – is in crisis. Though it is a highly heterogeneous assemblage, moulded by different histories involving myriad socio-cultural processes, its territorial integrity and sovereignty are always contingent and related to the distribution and organization of authority and power, and the state’s position within encompassing global dynamics. This volume attends to these contingencies as they are refracted by the communities and populations that are variously incorporated (in conformity or resistance) within their ordering processes. With ethnographically grounded analyses and thick description of locales as various as Russia, Lebanon and Indonesia, a vital conversation emerges about forms of state control under challenge or in transition. It is clear that the politico-social configurations of the state are still taking new directions, such as extremist populism and a general dissatisfaction with the corporatism of digital and technological revolutions. These are symptoms of the dilemmas at the peripheries of capital growth coming home to roost at their centres. Such transformations demand the new forms of conceptualization that the anthropological approaches of the essays in this volume present. A fascinating and timely collection that dwells on the unsettled nature of contemporary relationships between ‘state’ and ‘society’. Drawing on case studies from beyond the heartland of political theory, contributors refuse to treat global phenomena as generic and focus instead on the specific social relations that constitute the varied possibilities and limits of contemporary state power. Penny Harvey, Professor of Social Anthropology, University of Manchester This is political anthropology on a truly large canvas. The standing question about how ‘state’ and ‘society’ relate, and whether the distinction between them makes sense in the first place, is tackled deftly through the lenses of varying conceptions and practices of power and resistance. Martin Holbraad, Professor of Social Anthropology, University College London

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