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The Lives of Machines: The Industrial Imaginary in Victorian Literature and Culture

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ISBN: 9780472071401 9780472051403 Year: Language: English
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2012-04-06 14:29:55
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Today we commonly describe ourselves as machines that ""let off steam"" or feel ""under pressure."" The Lives of Machines investigates how Victorian technoculture came to shape this language of human emotion so pervasively and irrevocably and argues that nothing is more intensely human and affecting than the nonhuman. Tamara Ketabgian explores the emergence of a modern and more mechanical view of human nature in Victorian literature and culture. Treating British literature from the 1830s to the 1870s, this study examines forms of feeling and community that combine the vital and the mechanical, the human and the nonhuman, in surprisingly hybrid and productive alliances. Challenging accounts of industrial alienation that still persist, the author defines mechanical character and feeling not as erasures or negations of self, but as robust and nuanced entities in their own right. The Lives of Machines thus offers an alternate cultural history that traces sympathies between humans, animals, and machines in novels and nonfiction about factory work as well as in other unexpected literary sites and genres, whether domestic, scientific, musical, or philosophical. Ketabgian historicizes a model of affect and community that continues to inform recent theories of technology, psychology, and the posthuman. The Lives of Machines will be of interest to students of British literature and history, history of science and of technology, novel studies, psychoanalysis, and postmodern cultural studies.

The Limits of Patriarchy: How Female Networks of Pilfering and Gossip Sparked the First Debates on Rural Gender Rights in the 19th-Century Finnish-Language Press

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Book Series: Studia Fennica Ethnologica ISBN: 9789522223272 9789522227928 9789522227584 Year: Pages: 263 DOI: 10.21435/sfe.13 Language: English
Publisher: Finnish Literature Society / SKS Grant: Helsinki University Library and SKS
Subject: Anthropology --- History --- Social Sciences --- Sociology --- Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2016-09-27 11:01:47
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"In the mid-19th century, letters to newspapers in Finland began to condemn a practice known as home thievery, in which farm mistresses pilfered goods from their farms to sell behind the farm master’s back. Why did farm mistresses engage home thievery and why were writers so harsh in their disapproval of it? Why did many men in their letters nonetheless sympathize with women’s pilfering? What opinions did farm daughters express? This book explores theoretical concepts of agency and power applied to the 19th-century context and takes a closer look at the family patriarch, resistance to patriarchal power by farm mistresses and their daughters, and the identities of those Finnish men who already in the 1850s and 1860s sought to defend the rights of rural farm women."

Mediterranean quarantines, 1750–1914: Space, identity and power

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Book Series: Social Histories of Medicine ISBN: 9781526115546 Year: Pages: 336 Language: English
Publisher: Manchester University Press Grant: European Commission’s OpenAIRE project
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Social Sciences --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-03-17 11:01:59
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Mediterranean quarantines investigates how quarantine, the centuries-old practice of collective defence against epidemics, experienced significant transformations from the eighteenth century in the Mediterranean Sea, its original birthplace. The new epidemics of cholera and the development of bacteriology and hygiene, European colonial expansion, the intensification of commercial interchanges, the technological revolution in maritime and land transportation and the modernisation policies in Islamic countries were among the main factors behind such transformations. The book focuses on case studies on the European and Islamic shores of the Mediterranean showing the multidimensional nature of quarantine, the intimate links that sanitary administrations and institutions had with the territorial organisation of states, international trade, the construction of national, colonial, religious and professional identities of political regimes.

Chapter 6 - Prevention and stigma (Book chapter)

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Book Series: Social Histories of Medicine ISBN: 9781526127365 Year: Pages: 25 Language: English
Publisher: Manchester University Press Grant: European Commission’s OpenAIRE project
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Social Sciences --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-03-17 11:02:28
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This chapter investigates the use of quarantine as an instrument of social control and as dispositive for the construction and stigmatization of the Muslim ‘other’. The study takes the under-researched case of the Hajj to Mecca from the Balkans, hence focusing on Muslims from Bulgaria and Bosnia-Herzegovina (the latter under Austrian-Hungarian rule as from 1878). Both Bosnian and Bulgarian Muslim pilgrims experienced quarantine on their return from Mecca, yet in unequal measures. Bosnian hajjis were given a more lenient quarantine than their Bulgarian co-religionists by their separate sanitary authorities – with regard to the duration of isolation and the disinfection of their bodies and personal belongings. This was due to the different political and cultural attitudes towards their Muslim minorities by these two Balkan regimes.

Ordinary Jerusalem, 1840-1940

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Book Series: Open Jerusalem ISBN: 9789004375741 9789004375734 Year: Pages: 615 DOI: 10.1163/9789004375741 Language: English
Publisher: Brill Grant: FP7 Ideas: European Research Council - 337895
Subject: Anthropology --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2019-03-22 11:21:09
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In Ordinary Jerusalem, Angelos Dalachanis, Vincent Lemire and thirty-five scholars depict the ordinary history of an extraordinary global city in the late Ottoman and Mandate periods. Utilizing largely unknown archives, they revisit the holy city of three religions, which has often been defined solely as an eternal battlefield and studied exclusively through the prism of geopolitics and religion. At the core of their analysis are topics and issues developed by the European Research Council-funded project “Opening Jerusalem Archives: For a Connected History of Citadinité in the Holy City, 1840–1940.” Drawn from the French vocabulary of geography and urban sociology, the concept of citadinité describes the dynamic identity relationship a city’s inhabitants develop with each other and with their urban environment.

Parties, Politics, and the Sectional Conflict in Tennessee, 1832-1861

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ISBN: 9781572338449 157233844X Year: Pages: xviii, 371 Language: English
Publisher: Newfound Press
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2015-05-15 17:34:04
License: Newfound Press

Framed: The New Woman Criminal in British Culture at the Fin de Siècle

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ISBN: 9780472070442 9780472050444 9780472024469 Year: Language: English
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2012-04-06 14:29:55
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Framed uses fin de siècle British crime narrative to pose a highly interesting question: why do female criminal characters tend to be alluring and appealing while fictional male criminals of the era are unsympathetic or even grotesque? In this elegantly argued study, Elizabeth Carolyn Miller addresses this question, examining popular literary and cinematic culture from roughly 1880 to 1914 to shed light on an otherwise overlooked social and cultural type: the conspicuously glamorous New Woman criminal. In so doing, she breaks with the many Foucauldian studies of crime to emphasize the genuinely subversive aspects of these popular female figures. Drawing on a rich body of archival material, Miller argues that the New Woman Criminal exploited iconic elements of late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century commodity culture, including cosmetics and clothing, to fashion an illicit identity that enabled her to subvert legal authority in both the public and the private spheres.

In Good Faith?: Governing Indigenous Australia through God, Charity and Empire, 1825-1855

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Book Series: Aboriginal History Monograph ISBN: 9781921862113 Year: Pages: 223 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_459277 Language: English
Publisher: ANU Press
Subject: Political Science --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2012-06-14 11:46:24
License: ANU Press

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In the early decades of the 19th century, Indigenous Australians suffered devastating losses at the hands of British colonists, who largely ignored their sovereignty and even their humanity. At the same time, however, a new wave of Christian humanitarians were arriving in the colonies, troubled by Aboriginal suffering and arguing that colonists had obligations towards the people they had dispossessed. These white philanthropists raised questions which have shaped Australian society ever since. Did Indigenous Australians have rights to land, rationing, education and cultural survival? If so, how should these be guaranteed, and what would people have to give up in return? Would charity and paternalism lead to effective government or dismal failure – to a powerful defence of an oppressed people, or to new forms of oppression? In Good Faith? paints a vivid picture of life on Australia’s first missions and protectorate stations, examining the tensions between charity and rights, empathy and imperialism, as well as the intimacy, dependence, resentment and obligations that developed between missionary philanthropists and the people they tried to protect and control. In this work, Mitchell brings to life hitherto neglected moments in Australia’s history, and traces the origins of dilemmas still present today.

Chapter 3 - Mending “Moors” in Mogador (Book chapter)

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Book Series: Social Histories of Medicine ISBN: 9781526127365 Year: Pages: 41 Language: English
Publisher: Manchester University Press Grant: European Commission’s OpenAIRE project
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Social Sciences --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-03-17 11:01:51
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This chapter deals with a rather unknown quarantine institution: the lazaretto of Mogador Island in Morocco. Specifically, the work explores the site’s centrality to the Spanish imperialist project of “regeneration” over of its southern neighbour. In contrast with the “civilisation” schemes deployed by the leading European imperial powers at the end of the nineteenth century, regeneration did not seek to construct a colonial Morocco but a so-called African Spain in more balanced terms with peninsular Spain. This project was to be achieved through the support and direction of ongoing Moroccan initiatives of modernisation, as well as through the training of an elite of “Moors” who were to collaborate with Spanish experts sent to the country, largely based in Tangier. Within this general context, the Mogador Island lazaretto became a key site of regeneration projects. From a sanitary and political point of view, it was meant to define a Spanish-Moroccan space by marking its new borders and also to protect “Moorish” pilgrims against both the ideological and health-related risks associated with the Mecca pilgrimage.

Chapter 1 - Quarantine and territory in Spain during the second half of the nineteenth century (Book chapter)

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Book Series: Social Histories of Medicine ISBN: 9781526127365 Year: Pages: 32 Language: English
Publisher: Manchester University Press Grant: European Commission’s OpenAIRE project
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Social Sciences --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-03-17 11:01:59
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This chapter provides a thorough investigation of the modes by which the sanitary administration coevolved coherently with and inseparably from the Spanish state’s modern transport-communication and economic-industrial infrastructures throughout the nineteenth century. It also investigates examines how quarantine institutions functioned as sanitary gateways or entry checkpoints at borders, physically marking and consolidating while protecting the national territorial space. The paper traces the ideas underpinning the configuration and development of the sanitary network on Spanish national territory, which occurred unevenly – with the most evolved parts depending on certain strategic ports and on links with the railway transport infrastructure that was still under construction. It also suggests that the gradual relaxation of quarantine in liberal Spain was periodically called into question by economic and political policies that defined the relation between the coastal and inland regions of the country.

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