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The effect of hearing loss on neural processing

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889195404 Year: Pages: 375 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-540-4 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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Abstract

Efficient auditory processing requires the rapid integration of transient sensory inputs. This is exemplified in human speech perception, in which long stretches of a complex acoustic signal are typically processed accurately and essentially in real-time. Spoken language thus presents listeners’ auditory systems with a considerable challenge even when acoustic input is clear. However, auditory processing ability is frequently compromised due to congenital or acquired hearing loss, or altered through background noise or assistive devices such as cochlear implants. How does loss of sensory fidelity impact neural processing, efficiency, and health? How does this ultimately influence behavior? This Research Topic explores the neural consequences of hearing loss, including basic processing carried out in the auditory periphery, computations in subcortical nuclei and primary auditory cortex, and higher-level cognitive processes such as those involved in human speech perception. By pulling together data from a variety of disciplines and perspectives, we gain a more complete picture of the acute and chronic consequences of hearing loss for neural functioning.

Aging, neurogenesis and neuroinflammation in hearing loss and protection

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889196449 Year: Pages: 151 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-644-9 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Neurology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-08-16 10:34:25
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Worldwide, 278 million people are estimated to have moderate to profound hearing loss. Age-related hearing loss, also known as presbyacusis, affects approximately half of the population over 60 years old, making it the second most common cause of disability in older people. Hearing loss occurs when the sensory cells and neurons of the cochlea degenerate and die. The vestibular system, which holds the sense of balance, shares a common embryonic origin with the cochlea and together conform the inner ear. Balance problems are a trait of ageing to the point that balance ability is considered a sensor of physical decline and vestibular degeneration is the most common cause of falls in the elderly. Still the molecular bases of ageing in the vestibular system have not been studied in detail. Genetic and environmental factors contribute to the progression of age-related hearing loss (ARHL). Being noise the main environmental noxious agent for human hearing in the industrialized societies. There is no restorative treatment for deafness but functional replacement by means of prosthesis. Therefore, prevention and treatment of hearing loss is an unmet medical need. To develop innovative medical strategies against hearing loss, it is critical to understand the causes of ARHL and the essential pathways responsible for the manifestation of this complex disease. In this research topic, experts will discuss the stages and molecular elements of the damage and repair processes involved in ARHL, from cellular processes to molecules involved in aging. Oxidative stress takes a central stage as an essential element in the progression of injury and cell loss, and a target for cell protection strategies. Finally, the mechanisms of action and the potential of novel therapies for hair cell repair and protection will be discussed along with drug delivery strategies.

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