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A grammar of Pichi

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Book Series: Studies in Diversity Linguistics ISBN: 9783961101344 9783961101337 Year: DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.2546450 Language: English
Publisher: Language Science Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 104795
Subject: Linguistics
Added to DOAB on : 2019-04-18 11:21:03
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Pichi is an Afro-Caribbean English-lexifier Creole spoken on the island of Bioko, Equatorial Guinea. It is an offshoot of 19th century Krio (Sierra Leone) and shares many characteristics with West African relatives like Nigerian Pidgin, Cameroon Pidgin, and Ghanaian Pidgin English, as well as with the English-lexifier creoles of the insular and continental Caribbean. This comprehensive description presents a detailed analysis of the grammar and phonology of Pichi. It also includes a collection of texts and wordlists. Pichi features a nominative-accusative alignment, SVO word order, adjective-noun order, prenominal determiners, and prepositions. The language has a seven-vowel system and twenty-two consonant phonemes. Pichi has a two-tone system with tonal minimal pairs, morphological tone, and tonal processes. The morphological structure is largely isolating.

Advances in formal Slavic linguistics 2016

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ISBN: 9783961101283 9783961101276 Year: DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.2546440 Language: English
Publisher: Language Science Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 104793
Subject: Linguistics
Added to DOAB on : 2019-04-18 11:21:03
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Advances in Formal Slavic Linguistics 2016 initiates a new series of collective volumes on formal Slavic linguistics. It presents a selection of high quality papers authored by young and senior linguists from around the world and contains both empirically oriented work, underpinned by up-to-date experimental methods, as well as more theoretically grounded contributions. The volume covers all major linguistic areas, including morphosyntax, semantics, pragmatics, phonology, and their mutual interfaces. The particular topics discussed include argument structure, word order, case, agreement, tense, aspect, clausal left periphery, or segmental phonology. The topical breadth and analytical depth of the contributions reflect the vitality of the field of formal Slavic linguistics and prove its relevance to the global linguistic endeavour. Early versions of the papers included in this volume were presented at the conference on Formal Description of Slavic Languages 12 or at the satellite Worksh

A grammar of Yakkha

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Book Series: Studies in Diversity Linguistics ISBN: 9783946234111 9783946234128 9783946234135 Year: Pages: 601 + xvi DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_603340 Language: English
Publisher: Language Science Press
Subject: Linguistics
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-10 14:32:46
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This grammar provides the first comprehensive grammatical description of Yakkha, a Sino-Tibetan language of the Kiranti branch. Yakkha is spoken by about 14,000 speakers in eastern Nepal, in the Sankhuwa Sabha and Dhankuta districts. The grammar is based on original fieldwork in the Yakkha community. Its primary source of data is a corpus of 13,000 clauses from narratives and naturally-occurring social interaction which the author recorded and transcribed between 2009 and 2012. Corpus analyses were complemented by targeted elicitation. The grammar is written in a functional-typological framework. It focusses on morphosyntactic and semantic issues, as these present highly complex and comparatively under-researched fields in Kiranti languages. The sequence of the chapters follows the well-established order of phonological, morphological, syntactic and discourse-structural descriptions. These are supplemented by a historical and sociolinguistic introduction as well as an analysis of the complex kinship terminology. Topics such as verbal person marking, argument structure, transitivity, complex predication, grammatical relations, clause linkage, nominalization, and the topography-based orientation system have received in-depth treatment. Wherever possible, the structures found were explained in a historical-comparative perspective in order to shed more light on how their particular properties have emerged.

A grammar of Moloko

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Book Series: African Language Grammars and Dictionaries ISBN: 9783946234630 9783946234623 9783961100101 Year: Pages: 474 DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.824016 Language: English
Publisher: Language Science Press
Subject: Linguistics
Added to DOAB on : 2018-01-13 11:02:05
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"This grammar provides the first comprehensive grammatical description of Moloko, a Chadic language spoken by about 10,000 speakers in northern Cameroon. The grammar was developed from hours and years that the authors spent at friends’ houses hearing and recording stories, hours spent listening to the tapes and transcribing the stories, then translating them and studying the language through them. Time was spent together and with others speaking the language and talking about it, translating resources and talking to Moloko people about them. Grammar and phonology discoveries were made in the office, in the fields while working, and at gatherings. In the process, the four authors have become more and more passionate about the Moloko language and are eager to share their knowledge about it with others. Intriguing phonological aspects of Moloko include the fact that words have a consonantal skeleton and only one underlying vowel (but with ten phonetic variants). The simplicity of the vowel system contrasts with the complexity of the verb word, which can include information (in addition to the verbal idea) about subject, direct object (semantic Theme), indirect object (recipient or beneficiary), direction, location, aspect (Imperfective and Perfective), mood (indicative, irrealis, iterative), and Perfect aspect. Some of the fascinating aspects about the grammar of Moloko include transitivity issues, question formation, presupposition, and the absence of simple adjectives as a grammatical class. Most verbs are not inherently transitive or intransitive, but rather the semantics is tied to the number and type of core grammatical relations in a clause. Morphologically, two types of verb pronominals indicate two kinds of direct object; both are found in ditransitive clauses. Noun incorporation of special ‘body-part’ nouns in some verbs adds another grammatical argument and changes the lexical characteristics of the verb. Clauses of zero transitivity can occur in main clauses due to the use of dependent verb forms and ideophones. Question formation is interesting in that the interrogative pronoun is clause-final for most constructions. The clause will sometimes be reconfigured so that the interrogative pronoun can be clause-final. Expectation is a foundational pillar for Moloko grammar. Three types of irrealis mood relate to speaker’s expectation concerning the accomplishment of an event. Clauses are organised around the concept of presupposition, through the use of the na-construction. Known or expected elements are marked with the na particle. There are no simple adjectives in Moloko; all adjectives are derived from nouns. The authors invite others to further explore the intricacies of the phonology and grammar of this intriguing language."

A grammar of Pite Saami

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ISBN: 9783944675473 Year: Pages: 295 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_533870 Language: English
Publisher: Language Science Press
Subject: Linguistics
Added to DOAB on : 2014-09-24 15:06:32
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Pite Saami is a highly endangered Western Saami language in the Uralic language family currently spoken by a few individuals in Swedish Lapland. This grammar is the first extensive book-length treatment of a Saami language written in English. &#xD;While focussing on the morphophonology of the main word classes nouns, adjectives and verbs, it also deals with other linguistic structures such as prosody, phonology, phrase types and clauses. &#xD;Furthermore, it provides an introduction to the language and its speakers, and an outline of a preliminary Pite Saami orthography. &#xD;An extensive annotated spoken-language corpus collected over the course of five years forms the empirical foundation for this description, and each example includes a specific reference to the corpus in order to facilitate verification of claims made on the data. &#xD;Descriptions are presented for a general linguistics audience and without attempting to support a specific theoretical approach. &#xD;This book should be equally useful for scholars of Uralic linguistics, typologists, and even learners of Pite Saami.

The Ik language: Dictionary and grammar sketch

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Book Series: African Language Grammars and Dictionaries ISBN: 9783944675954 9783944675961 9783944675688 Year: Pages: 569 DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.344792 Language: English
Publisher: Language Science Press
Subject: Linguistics
Added to DOAB on : 2017-06-29 11:02:01
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This book is a dictionary and grammar sketch of Ik, one of the three Kuliak (Rub) languages spoken in the beautiful Karamoja region of northeastern Uganda. It is the lexicographic sequel to A grammar of Ik (Icé-tód): Northeast Uganda’s last thriving Kuliak language (Schrock 2014). The present volume includes an Ik-English dictionary with roughly 8,700 entries, followed by a reversed English-Ik index. These two main sections are then supplemented with an outline of Ik grammar that is comprehensive in its coverage of topics and written in a simple style, using standard linguistic terminology in a way that is accessible to interested non-linguists as well. This book may prove useful for language preservation and development among the Ik people, as a reference tool for non-Ik learners of the language, and as a source of data, not only for the comparative study of Kuliak but also the wider Afroasiatic and Nilo-Saharan language families.

On this and other worlds

Authors: ---
Book Series: Studies in Diversity Linguistics ISBN: 9783961100187 9783961100194 Year: Pages: 496 DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.892102 Language: English
Publisher: Language Science Press
Subject: Linguistics
Added to DOAB on : 2018-01-16 11:01:56
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"This edited volume offers a collection of twelve interlinear texts reflecting the vast linguistic diversity of Amazonia as well as the rich verbal arts and oral literature traditions of Amazonian peoples. Contributions to the volume come from a variety of geographic regions and represent the Carib, Jê, Tupi, East Tukano, Nadahup, and Pano language families, as well as three linguistic isolates. The selected texts exemplify a variety of narrative styles recounting the origins of constellations, crops, and sacred cemeteries, and of travel to worlds beyond death. We hear tales of tricksters and of encounters between humans and other beings, learn of battles between enemies, and gain insight into history and the indigenous perspective of creation, cordiality and confrontation. The contributions to this volume are the result of research efforts conducted since 2000, and as such, exemplify rapidly expanding investment and interest in documenting native Amazonian voices. They moreover demonstrate the collaborative efforts of linguists, anthropologists, and indigenous leaders, storytellers, and researchers to study and preserve Amazonian languages and cultures. Each chapter offers complete interlinear analysis as well as ample commentary on both linguistic and cultural aspects, appealing to a wide audience, including linguists, historians, anthropologists, and other social scientists. This collection is the first of its type, constituting a significant contribution to focused study of Amazonian linguistic diversity and a relevant addition to our broader knowledge of Amerindian languages and cosmologies."

Pfade in die Krise

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ISBN: 9783737008358 Year: DOI: 10.14220/9783737008358 Language: German
Publisher: V&R unipress Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 103502
Added to DOAB on : 2018-07-06 11:01:02
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Why is it so diffcult for companies like Schlecker to leave once chosen paths of strategic development at the right time, and to rearrange their strategies when faced with new environmental challenges? This paper shows with a perspective on organizational path dependence theory how economic und social mechanisms might favour the reproduction of established strategies - and at the same time complicate leaving the strategical development paths even more. The part of familial influence on decision processes is researched and the factor of family in the formation of strategic path dependence is inquired based on qualitative case studies.

Funktionen von Possessivsuffixen in den ugrischen Sprachen

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ISBN: 9783946198475 9783946198451 9783946198444 9783946198468 Year: Pages: 206 DOI: 10.16994/bal Language: German
Publisher: Modern Academic Publishing
Subject: Linguistics --- Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-03-16 11:21:03
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The Ugric languages Mansi, Khanty and Hungarian form a branch of the Uralic language family which is mainly spread across North-Eastern Europe and Siberia. Other prominent languages of the Uralic family are e.g. Finnish, Saami and Estonian. The Ob-Ugric languages Mansi and Khanty are spoken in Western Siberia along the Ob’ river and its tributaries, thus they are referred to as Ob-Ugric. Their closest relative is Hungarian, spoken in Hungary and its neighboring countries. The status of the Khanty and Mansi languages is endangered: only 20% out of 8,000 ethnic Mansi and 30% out of 22,000 ethnic Khanty still speak their mother tongue, and there are nearly no monolingual speakers. In contrast, Hungarian is an official language of the European Union, spoken by about 15 million people. Hence, the status of literacy, language documentation and language education differs noticeably between Ob-Ugric and Hungarian.&#xD;From a typological point of view, the Ugric languages are basically so-called SOV languages, their morphology is mainly agglutinative, i.e. grammatical information is rather encoded with suffixes which are attached to the stem instead of using prepositions, pronouns or articles. The most accessible referent in a discourse is not overtly realized on the surface of the sentence. Its position remains empty (zero-anaphora). This is also revealed in rich paradigms of personal suffixes which are used instead. One set of personal suffixes is attached to nominal stems and called possessive suffixes. They are involved in the structure of so-called attributive possessive constructions in most Uralic languages. As revealed in their denomination, research on possessive suffixes in Ugric languages, as in most Uralic languages, has primarily viewed them in the light of their function as markers of possessive relations, traditionally referred to as their prototypical use.&#xD;The linguistic concept of possession seems to be universal. The notion of possession itself, though, is purely abstract and can only be understood as a »broader concept of association or relationship between two nouns«. While the definition is an abstract collective term, there is a broad consensus among linguists that certain prototypical meanings are covered by the concept of possession. These are: part-whole relations, kinship relations (both by blood and marriage), ownership relations as well as a fourth column covering all kinds of association in general (e.g. attribution, properties or orientation/location). The use of attributive possessive constructions is very frequent in most Uralic languages and, in a considerable amount of cases, a possessive reading of the relation is excluded, even in the most abstract interpretation of possession. Such cases, where the so-called prototypical use of possessive suffixes (i.e. denoting a possessive relation) fails to serve as an explanation, are frequently subsumed under the node of non-prototypical use and a secondary, non-possessive function is attributed to possessive suffixes. This secondary function is for instance likened to the properties of a definite article.&#xD;

The Alor-Pantar languages: History and typology

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ISBN: 9783944675480 Year: Pages: 477 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_533875 Language: English
Publisher: Language Science Press
Subject: Linguistics --- Mathematics
Added to DOAB on : 2014-09-24 15:10:12
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The Alor-Pantar family constitutes the westernmost outlier group of Papuan (Non-Austronesian) languages. Its twenty or so languages are spoken on&#xD;the islands of Alor and Pantar, located just north of Timor, in eastern In-&#xD;donesia. Together with the Papuan languages of Timor, they make up the&#xD;Timor-Alor-Pantar family. The languages average 5,000 speakers and are&#xD;under pressure from the local Malay variety as well as the national lan-&#xD;guage, Indonesian.&#xD;This volume studies the internal and external linguistic history of this&#xD;interesting group, and showcases some of its unique typological features,&#xD;such as the preference to index the transitive patient-like argument on&#xD;the verb but not the agent-like one; the extreme variety in morphologi-&#xD;cal alignment patterns; the use of plural number words; the existence of&#xD;quinary numeral systems; the elaborate spatial deictic systems involving&#xD;an elevation component; and the great variation exhibited in their kinship&#xD;systems.&#xD;Unlike many other Papuan languages, Alor-Pantar languages do not ex-&#xD;hibit clause-chaining, do not have switch reference systems, never suffix&#xD;subject indexes to verbs, do not mark gender, but do encode clusivity in&#xD;their pronominal systems. Indeed, apart from a broadly similar head-final&#xD;syntactic profile, there is little else that the Alor-Pantar languages share&#xD;with Papuan languages spoken in other regions. While all of them show&#xD;some traces of contact with Austronesian languages, in general, borrow-&#xD;ing from Austronesian has not been intense, and contact with Malay and&#xD;Indonesian is a relatively recent phenomenon in most of the Alor-Pantar&#xD;region.

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