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African Disability Rights Yearbook Volume 4 2016

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ISSN: 2311-8970 ISBN: 24137138 Year: Pages: 337 Language: English
Publisher: Pretoria University Law Press (PULP)
Subject: Law
Added to DOAB on : 2020-04-09 12:11:33
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About the publicationThe African Disability Rights Yearbook addresses disability rights within the foundational structure laid down by the inaugural issue. The structure comprises a tripartite division between: articles; country reports; and shorter commentaries on recent regional and sub-regional developments.The African Disability Rights Yearbook aims to advance disability scholarship. Coming in the wake of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, it is the first peer-reviewed journal to focus exclusively on disability as human rights on the African continent. It provides an annual forum for scholarly analysis on issues pertaining to the human rights of persons with disabilities.It is also a source for country-based reports as well as commentaries on recent developments in the field of disability rights in the African region.The African Disability Rights Yearbook publishes peer-reviewed contributions dealing with the rights of persons with disabilities and related topics, with specific relevance to Africa, Africans and scholars of Africa.The Yearbook appears annually under the aegis of the Centre for Human Rights, Faculty of Law, University of Pretoria.The Yearbook is an open access online publication, see www.adry.up.ac.zaAbout the editors:Charles Ngwena is Professor, Department of Constitutional Law and Legal Philosophy, Faculty of Law, University of the Free State, South Africa.Ilze Grobbelaar‐du Plessis is a senior lecturer and holds the degrees BIuris LLB LLM LLD from the University of Pretoria.Helene Combrinck is Associate Professor at the Centre for Disability Law and Policy, University of the Western Cape.Serges Djoyou Kamgais is Senior Lecturer at TMALI (UNISA).Table of ContentsStigma as barrier to the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in AfricaMark MostertRealising the inclusion of youth with disabilities in political and public life in KenyaLucianna ThuoReading ‘disability’ into the non-discrimination clause of the Nigerian ConstitutionNgozi Chuma UmehLegislative mechanisms for combating violence against children with disabilities in selected African jurisdictions: A critical appraisalEnoch ChilembaMy right to know: Developing sexuality education resources for learners with intellectual disability in the Western Cape, South AfricaRebecca JohnsColleen Adnams(Re)thinking sexual access for adolescents with disabilities in South Africa: Balancing rights and protectionPaul ChappellThe development and use of Sign Language in South African schools: The denial of inclusive educationWillene HolnessImplementing article 33 of CRPD: Tanzanian approachAbdallah PossiSECTION B: COUNTRY REPORTSAngolaEduardo KapapeloGabonChristophe TchudjoVictorine Maptue ToguemSenegalAbdoulaye ThiamSeydi Ababacar Sy SowSECTION C: REGIONAL DEVELOPMENTSThe jurisprudence of the committee on the rights of persons with disabilities and its implications for AfricaInnocentia MgijimaThe right to work and employment in Southern Africa: A commentary on how selected employment laws fare against article 27 of the CRPDDianah MsipaBOOK REVIEWDon Kulick & Jens Rydström Loneliness and its opposite: Sex, disability, and the ethics of engagement (2015)Paul Chappell

The implementation of modern African Constitutions: Challenges and prospects

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ISBN: 9781920538651 Year: Pages: 335 Language: English
Publisher: Pretoria University Law Press (PULP)
Subject: Law
Added to DOAB on : 2020-04-08 15:51:21
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In “The implementation of modern African Constitutions: challenges and prospects”, the authors try to identify obstacles to constitutional implementation in Africa and, on the basis of good practice, assess how this could be overcome. A single volume like this cannot unravel the complexity of the causes and effects of, and solutions to, the problem of non-implementation of constitutions in Africa: the subject is far too intricate. Nevertheless, this study, represents a first attempt to draw attention to the issue, and hopes to open a serious debate about it and pave the way for making this issue an integral consideration in constitution-building in the future. The variety of perspectives provided in analysing the challenges to constitution-implementation in this volume should make it to appeal to academics, practitioners, policy makers and postgraduate research students interested in the intricacies of comparative African constitutional law.

Deciphering Markets and Money

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ISBN: 9789523690011 9789523690004 9789523690028 9789523690035 Year: Pages: 203 DOI: 10.33134/HUP-1 Language: English
Publisher: Helsinki University Press
Subject: Economics --- Sociology
Added to DOAB on : 2020-03-04 11:21:03
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"During the last two decades, economic sociology has experienced a remarkable revival and has become one of the most innovative fields of sociological research. Shifts in economic policy worldwide have led to the increasing interest in the sociological analysis of economic phenomena and institutions by challenging traditional research questions and demonstrating the limits and problems inherent in standard economic thinking and reasoning. Jukka Gronow’s book Deciphering Markets and Money solves the problem of the specific social conditions of an economic order based on money and the equal exchange of commodities. Gronow scrutinizes the relation of sociology to neoclassical economics and reflects on how sociology can contribute to the analyses of the major economic institutions. The question of the comparability and commensuration of economic objects runs through the chapters of the book. The author shows that due to the multidimensionality and principal quality uncertainty of products, markets would collapse without market devices that are either procedural, consisting of technical standards and measuring instruments, or aesthetic, relying on the judgements of taste, or both. In his book, Gronow demonstrates that in this respect, financial markets share the same problem as the markets of, wines, movies, or PCs and mobile phones, and hence offer a highly actual case to study their social constitution in the process of coming into being. Jukka Gronow is professor emeritus of sociology at Uppsala University, Sweden, and docent at the University of Helsinki, Finland. He has published on sociology of consumption, history of sociology and social theory."

National Commissions of Inquiry in Africa: Vehicles to pursue accountability for violations of the right to life?

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ISBN: 9781920538866 Year: Pages: 338 Language: English
Publisher: Pretoria University Law Press (PULP)
Subject: Law
Added to DOAB on : 2020-09-09 13:45:17
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National commissions of inquiry in the aftermath of violations of human rights, including violations of the right to life, are a common feature of the African legal and political landscape. There is often a fair measure of scepticism or caution about their use, and with good reason. They can serve as convenient instruments to avoid accountability, rather than to achieve it. However, very little hard evidence is available upon which the performance of such commissions can be assessed, and hence impressions of their utility are often largely anecdotal.For the purposes of this book, researchers went to six countries in Africa—Chad, Burkina Faso, Kenya, Malawi, South Africa and Nigeria—and conducted in-depth investigations of commissions of inquiry that have been held there, interviewing those directly involved in the proceedings and those working on the issues since, including victims, lawyers, investigators and Commissioners. Drawing on this research, the book argues that commissions of inquiry should not be contrasted with courts or with criminal trials, since their proper place is at a different stage of the investigative process. Rather than replacing criminal processes, commissions might guide whether and how they should take place. Commissions can be cathartic events for victims or families; they can demonstrate that human rights are a priority for the state and thus lay the foundations for the rule of law; and they can make broader recommendations about what should be done. In short, in certain circumstances, they can serve to enable a broader concept of accountability.Praise for this publication“A rich collection of well-researched chapters made up of normative analysis and case studies, which presents a much-needed scholarly contribution to the question of accountability for violations of human rights—particularly the right to life—through a means other than a routine criminal process, a question with which the African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights wrestled in its Study on Transitional Justice that was the basis for the African Union Transitional Justice Policy. The insights it offers on why, how and when Commissions of Inquiry in Africa facilitate accountability are profoundly informative not only for scholars but also for policy makers and practitioners.”Solomon Ayele DerssoChairperson, African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights “This book covers new ground, with six rich case studies drawing from on-the ground research across the African continent. It demonstrates that while independent mechanisms can all face significant challenges in the aftermath of grave violations of human rights, properly-mandated, adequately-empowered and well-supported commissions of inquiry can in some cases play a valuable role within broader processes of accountability. The authors rightly focus on the complementarity of the different elements that a transitional justice process must have in order to be compatible with human rights standards, making an extraordinary theoretical contribution to debates about how to guarantee human rights in the face of atrocious facts.”Fabián SalvioliUN Special Rapporteur on the promotion of truth, justice, reparation and guarantees of non-recurrenceTable of ContentsBackground and acknowledgments &Members of the research teamIntroduction: The role of national commissions of inquiry in securing the supreme human rightThomas Probert & Christof HeynsA brief introduction to the right to life and the normative framework mandating accountability, including the duty to investigate potentially unlawful deaths, as well as to the broader research project lying behind this volumeThe concept of accountability and its importance for the protection of the right to lifeThomas ProbertA chapter that looks at how the mutually-reinforcing character of human rights accountability is fundamental to its definition, and the consequence that human rights accountability must contain three key elements: finding out what happened and who was responsible (investigations); finding waysof remedying the situation (remedies); and finding ways of preventing it from happening again (reforms).‘Lawfare’, instruments of governmentality and accountability, or both? An overview of national commissions of inquiry in AfricaMeetali JainA chapter illustrating how commissions of inquiry have a long pedigree in the legal and bureaucratic architecture of several of the colonial powers in Africa, and have been adopted by many African governments during the post-colonial period. It explores how the commission of inquiry, as an instrument of governmentality, can be and has been imposed for the purpose of legalistic domination, but how it has sometimes acquired a life of its own and also catalysed reform.Commissions of inquiry and social solidarity in the African contextChristof HeynsA chapter that discusses the extent to which it is possible to draw lessons from an historical emphasis on social solidarity to inform our understanding of the role of commissions in Africa. In particular, it explores the extent to which South African jurisprudence has been informed by or has deployed the concept of ubuntu and its impact on accountability, also for right to life violationsShedding all the light? The Commission of Inquiry into the Crimes and Misappropriations of Hissène Habré in ChadThe first case-study chapter, this examines the Commission of Inquiry into the Crimes and Misappropriations Committed by Ex-President Habré, his Accomplices and/or Accessories, which took place in Chad in 1990 to 1991. Established by new President Idriss Déby after Habré had fled the country, it provided a rather one-sided account of the abuses that had occurred during the latter’s rule. Nonetheless, its role in documenting violations, and its status as an official record adopted by the government of Chad, would go on to play a central role in the long story of the pursuit of justice for Habré’s victims, culminating in the Extraordinary African Chambers verdict and his conviction in 2016.A murdered journalist and a crisis of faith in the judiciary: The Independent Commission of Inquiry into the Death of Norbert Zongo in Burkina FasoThomas ProbertWhereas that Chadian Commission reviewed evidence of violations that took place over eight years, and reported on thousands of deaths, the next case study, that of the Independent Commission of Inquiry into the Death of Norbert Zongo and His Four Companions in Burkina Faso in 1999, investigated the events of a single afternoon. This chapter shows how, while the Commission focused on the murder of a journalist, the mobilisation for its establishment, and the challenges it faced reflected a complete lack of faith of the official judicial machinery of Blaise Compaoré’s regime.Public hearings and secret envelopes: The Waki Commission as a case study of accountability in KenyaAnyango Yvonne OyiekeThe third case study is of the well-known Commission of Inquiry into Post-Election Violence in Kenya (sometimes called the Waki Commission). This Commission played a central role at the beginning of a long process of the pursuit of accountability for the abuses at the hands of both non-state and state actors in the aftermath of the 2007 election in Kenya. The Commission formed part of an internationally-mediated peace agreement, involved two international commissioners, and would ultimately end up implicated in a far more international process of indictments before the ICC that would lead to a sitting President appearing (briefly) in the dock at The Hague.A slow but steady search for justice: The Commission of Inquiry into the July 2011 ‘riots’ in MalawiJohn KotsopoulosThe conduct of the police was also examined by the Commission of Inquiry into the Death and Destruction of Property during the events of July 2011 in Malawi. This case was an interesting example of a commission of inquiry investigating a single set of events (the state’s response to a coordinated set of public protests across several cities) from multiple social perspectives, while also drawing important lessons for how the police ought to conduct public order operations.The rose that grew from concrete: The Commission of Inquiry into policing in Khayelitsha, South AfricaMeetali JainThe Commission of Inquiry into Police Inefficiency in Khayleitsha was tasked with investigating an ongoing situation, in one of South Africa’s larger townships. Rather than inquiring into a specific police action, it was in many ways tasked with examining the causes of police inaction. This chapter shows how a commission established by the provincial government of the Western Cape was able to cast a spotlight on a series of social injustices that contributed to substantially weaker protections of the right to life.The (im)partiality of justice: The challenges of investigating the clashes between the Islamic Movement of Nigeria and the Nigerian army in Zaria, NigeriaAnyango Yvonne OyiekeThe final case study is the most recent. The Kaduna State Commission of Inquiry into the Clashes Between the Islamic Movement of Nigeria and the Nigerian Army in Zaria Between 12th & 14th December 2015 provides an interesting example in many respects of how not to conduct a commission of inquiry. This chapter demonstrates how, provided with a less than impartial mandate, a commission can ostensibly neglect the opportunity to conduct detailed investigations into credible evidence of serious violations.Commissions of inquiry: Valuable first steps towards accountability or smokescreens for inaction?Thomas Probert & Christof HeynsWhile not based on a representative sample of current usage or “success”, the findings of this study can lend themselves to certain generalised observations about the effectiveness of commissions of inquiry as accountability mechanisms, and the circumstances under which they can play a role in the broader process that fulfils the state’s procedural obligations with regard to violations of the right to life. In a concluding chapter the editors pull together some of these general characteristics, while also drawing upon international human rights law standards for the conduct of investigations.Annex: A list of commissions of inquiry in Africa, 1990-2016

Chapter: '‘Anachronistic As Colonial Remnants May Be…’ Locating the Rights of the Chagos Islanders As a Case Study of the Operation of Human Rights Law in Colonial Territories' from book: Fifty Years of the British Indian Ocean Territory: Legal Perspectives (Book chapter)

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Book Series: The World of Small States ISBN: 9783319785400 9783319785417 Year: Pages: 39 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-78541-7_8 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature Grant: European Research Council
Subject: History --- Migration
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-01 17:23:32
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In the colonial era, it was commonplace for treaties binding on the metropolitan state to be applicable in that state’s colonies if the state made a declaration to this effect, via the operation of a ‘colonial clause’ in the treaty. This reflects concepts of trusteeship-over-people and civilizational difference which legitimized colonial rule in general and the role of the colonial authority in determining what standards were appropriate in colonial territories in particular. The colonial-clause model for applicability was adopted in the European Convention on Human Rights of 1950 and certain of its Protocols, but not other subsequent human rights treaties. The standard jurisprudential view is that in the absence of a colonial clause declaration, the Convention cannot be applicable on the alternative basis on which it operates in a state’s territory and to its extraterritorial activities. Such a declaration of applicability was not made in relation to the Chagos Islands, a UK colony, where human rights questions have been raised by the forced displacement by the UK of the indigenous population between 1968 and 1973, the continued denial of this people of their right to return, and more recent allegations concerning the US military base on one of the islands, Diego Garcia. However, in a 2012 decision, the European Court of Human Rights suggested that the standard position on the exclusive determinacy of declarations under the colonial clause may no longer be sustainable. The present piece takes this suggestion and explores its potential, taking into account the significance of the self-determination entitlement in having delegitimized the underlying concepts of trusteeship and civilizational difference on which the standard position is based.

Reconsidering Constitutional Formation II Decisive Constitutional Normativity: From Old Liberties to New Precedence

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Book Series: Studies in the History of Law and Justice ISSN: 2198-9842 ISBN: 9783319730363 9783319730370 Year: Volume: 12 Pages: 419 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-73037-0 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature Grant: European Commission; European Research Council (ERC); University of Passau
Subject: Law
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-29 15:51:53
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This second volume of ReConFort, published open access, addresses the decisive role of constitutional normativity, and focuses on discourses concerning the legal role of constitutional norms. Taken together with ReConFort I (National Sovereignty), it calls for an innovative reassessment of constitutional history drawing on key categories to convey the legal nature of the constitution itself (national sovereignty, precedence, justiciability of power, judiciary as constituted power).In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, constitutional normativity began to complete the legal fixation of the entire political order. This juridification in one constitutional text resulted in a conceptual differentiation from ordinary law, which extends to alterability and justiciability. The early expressions of this ‘new order of the ages’ suggest an unprecedented and irremediable break with European legal tradition, be it with British colonial governance or the French ancien régime. In fact, while the shift to constitutions as a hierarchically ‘higher’ form of positive law was a revolutionary change, it also drew upon old liberties. The American constitutional discourse, which was itself heavily influenced by British common law, in turn served as an inspiration for a variety of constitutional experiments – from the French Revolution to Napoleon’s downfall, in the halls of the Frankfurt Assembly, on the road to a unified Italy, and in the later theoretical discourse of twentieth-century Austria. If the constitution states the legal rules for the law-making process, then its Kelsian primacy is mandatory.Also included in this volume are the French originals and English translations of two vital documents. The first – Emmanuel Joseph Sieyès’ Du Jury Constitutionnaire (1795) – highlights an early attempt to reconcile the democratic values of the French Revolution with the pragmatic need to legally protect the Revolution. The second – the 1812 draft of the Constitution of the Kingdom of Poland – presents the ‘constitutional propaganda’ of the Russian Tsar Alexander I to bargain for the support of the Lithuanian and Polish nobility. These documents open new avenues of research into Europe’s constitutional history: one replete with diverse contexts and national experiences, but above all an overarching motif of constitutional decisiveness that served to complete the juridification of sovereignty. (www.reconfort.eu)

Die Wiener Stadtbücher 1395-1430, Teil 5: 1418-1421

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ISBN: 9783205204435 Year: Pages: 466 Seiten Language: Latin
Publisher: Böhlau Grant: Austrian Science Fund - PUB 443
Added to DOAB on : 2018-04-21 11:01:55
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The Archive of the City of Vienna keeps three folio-volumes of a manuscript in conservation of her archive, which in common was marked as “Wiener Testamentsbücher” (Viennese Last Wills-Register). The source, comprising the period of 1395 to 1430, at this time was named “Stadtbuch”, and this appoints the character of such registers, which served for registration of legal transactions in urban space. In total the “Stadtbuch” embodies more than 4.500 registrations, in most cases last wills (“Geschäfte”), but also a lot of registrations about transactions concerning private law as well as matters of pubic law.

Pretoria Student Law Review 2020-14-2

ISSN: 1998-0280 ISBN: 19980280 Year: Pages: 401 Language: English
Publisher: Pretoria University Law Press (PULP)
Subject: Law
Added to DOAB on : 2020-10-13 11:21:17
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About the publicationHonoured to present to you, the reader, the 2020 edition of the Pretoria Student Law Review (PSLR), an annual publication which is the pride of the best law faculty in Africa (according to the Times Higher Education World University Rankings). The University of Pretoria’s Law Faculty ranks in the top 100 law faculties in the world, a feat unequalled in Africa. The PSLR is a student driven law review that creates an interactive forum for students, academics and legal professionals to discuss topical legal matters that challenge the status quo. At the beginning of this year, lay the fantasy of newness — presenting an opportunity to do great things. But as I reflect on the journey leading to this publication, I understand that the 2020 edition of the PSLR had an engine that ran on hope; faith; dedication; perseverance; commitment and hard work. Our predecessors had a vision to create a boldly outlined legacy for the PSLR, they spearheaded the setting up of a system that would last the lifespan of the PSLR. Today, some 13 years after the first edition of the PSLR, South Africa, the continent and the world at large are on the cusp of a new era — socially, economically and politically. When my journey as Editor-in-Chief commenced, I imagined the PSLR as a ship, whose captain was myself. Customarily, it is easy to be a captain of a ship in calm seas, but unlike most of my predecessors, I have had to be the captain of a ship through the heftiest of storms. The world was not truly prepared to face challenges presented by the Covid-19, let alone the PSLR. In the wake of the 4IR and this new age of technology, sailing this ship to success was still a heavy task to complete.It is therefore with great honour to have been able to successfully complete the task for which we, the 14th cohort of the Editorial Board, were called for. We have upheld the esteemed reputations that have been left by our predecessors. Fittingly, I wish to applaud my team for their inspiring commitment, outstanding contribution and service in maintaining the elevated standard of the PSLR. For indeed it is a publication, par excellence.Amidst the storms, we have spearheaded the establishment of a ‘free-floating’ PSLR Collection in the OR Tambo Law Library. This collection is dedicated to house all published PSLR editions, dating since the inception of the PSLR in 2007. We have established and strengthened relations with other Law Faculties in the country, and even beyond. We published the very first special edition of the PSLR, a focused edition that covers a critical issue brought before the South African Law Deans Association — the Decolonisation of Legal Education. We have established a system by which all authors who publish with us, ought to have an ORCID iD. We have adopted internal regulations that outline the principles that govern the Editorial Board. We have spearheaded the adoption and implementation of a policy that forces us to comply with DHET Standards in order to be a DHET Accredited Journal so as to encourage and foster a student culture of critical research & writing in legal academia.I am truly proud of the work that the authors have put into their articles and I would like to thank them for their submissions and tireless efforts to produce quality articles. More-so, I am proud of the Editorial Board for being able to work under immense pressure. This edition would have not been possible without the dedication and hard work of this dream team. I remain indebted to you all: Adelaide Chagopa, Kayla Thomas, Marcia van der Merwe, Nicholas Herd and Phenyo Sekati. It has been a great pleasure and a privilege to have worked with you on this annual edition. A note of thanks to Dr Gustav Muller in his capacity as the Guardian of the PSLR. To the reviewers, your adjudication lays the foundation for each edition, year-in-yearout. Your support and contribution to the PSLR remains invaluable. To Lizette Hermann, Elzet Hurter and Mornay Hassen, thank you for your continued and immeasurable support throughout this journey. To Primrose E.R Kurasha, thank you for believing in me and for guiding me. I am forever indebted to you my friend.To my family: Elizabeth Mtshweni; Jostina Mtshweni; Clayton Mtshweni; Lucas Berto Mateus; Stephine Mashilo and Lerato Mashilo, words cannot begin to express my gratitude for all the support you have given me throughout this journey. Thank you for keeping me sane through one of the toughest times of my ‘publishing’ career. Thank you for the endless amount of support and the unconditional love you give me always. You are the power & oil that kept this engine running, all by the sufficient grace of God.I hereby pass the baton and entrust the next Editor-in-Chief with the difficult task of running faster and running a better marathon than myself and my predecessors.To you future author, I implore you to start writing, for the water does not flow until the faucet is turned on. To you the reader, Jurgen Zwecker was right: enjoy the read — without fear to question what is in front of you, for that is the only way we, as scholars, grow.Simon MotshweniEditor-in-Chief2020

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