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Evidence in Civil Law - Denmark

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Book Series: Law & Society ISBN: 9789616842464 Year: Pages: 31 DOI: 10.4335/978-961-6842-46-4 Language: English
Publisher: Institute for Local Self-Government and Public Procurement Maribor
Subject: Political Science
Added to DOAB on : 2015-11-09 10:57:16
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Danish civil procedure is based on a number of procedural law principles that affect the taking of evidence, including the principle of party presentation, the principle of disposition, and the principle of free assessment of evidence. The nature of Danish procedural law tends towards the adversarial model rather than the inquisitorial model. Evidence is taken during the hearing and the principle of directness applies to the procedure. Danish civil procedure is governed by the 1916 Administration of Justice Act, which was originally strongly influenced by German law. The role of the judge is to lead the process and also to intervene in proceedings when uncertainty exists, rather than just to facilitate the process by ensuring the parties abide by the laws of civil procedure.

Evidence in Civil Law - Finland

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Book Series: Law & Society ISBN: 9789616842471 Year: Pages: 46 DOI: 10.4335/978-961-6842-47-1 Language: English
Publisher: Institute for Local Self-Government and Public Procurement Maribor
Subject: Political Science
Added to DOAB on : 2015-11-09 20:25:35
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Finnish civil procedure has a close connection with other Scandinavian legal systems and co-operation between the States is active. In addition, the legislation, case-law and scholarly doctrine are more and more influenced by European co-operation through the EU and Council of Europe. The principles of free disposition, free assessment of evidence, audiatur altera pars, and burden of proof form the basis for an oral and direct public hearing. It follows from these due process principles that no methods of proof are forbidden but their relevance depends on the court’s assessment. The procedural doctrine in Finland is well established and has roots in the Swedish code of civil procedure of 1734, although it has gone through extensive reforms. On February 10, 2015 the Parliament of Finland passed the reform of chapter 17 of code of civil procedure, which contains the legislation on law of evidence. The extensive reform systematically updates and streamlines the previous legislation on evidence in addition to introducing new regulation e.g. on anonymous witnesses and banning invocation of evidence, which has been obtained by illegal means. The reform of chapter 17 concludes the systematic reform.

Evidence in Civil Law - Slovenia

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Book Series: Law & Society ISBN: 9789616842587 Year: Pages: 111 DOI: 10.4335/978-961-6842-58-7 Language: English
Publisher: Institute for Local Self-Government and Public Procurement Maribor
Subject: Political Science
Added to DOAB on : 2015-11-09 21:06:15
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Under the Article 22 of the Slovenian Constitution the right to equal protection of rights guarantees the right to state the facts and submit evidence, the right to be present at the taking of evidence and to be informed on the results of the taking of evidence. The principle of free assessment is a fundamental principle in Slovenian civil procedure included in Article 8 of the CPA. In the system of free assessment the judge is the one to evaluate the evidence without being bound by any formal rules on probative value of certain evidence. Probative value depends only on individual belief or conviction of the trial judge in each matter separately. The free assessment of evidence is the right and duty of the court to assess each piece of evidence separately and collectively. In the evidence-taking stage the CPA includes the special rules for each type of evidence, meant as a minimum guarantee for the right free assessment of the taken evidence and the free assessment of evidence presupposes that the evidence were taken by this rules. Even though, court decides which evidence will be produced for determination of the ultimate facts, the court is bound by the parties’ right to propose evidence – with their procedural burden of proof. If the court rejects the proposal of a certain piece of evidence this rejections must be explained. In the following book the author discusses the key principles of the law of evidence in Slovenian civil procedure. The book provides analysis of the law of evidence, while placing the subject within its theoretical context. The subject is presented in a logical structure following on from the introduction of the basic principles through the rules for burden of proof, types of evidence, costs of evidence, the question of unlawful evidence, and the cross-border taking of evidence.

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