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Cancer Immunotherapy & Immuno-monitoring: Mechanism, Treatment, Diagnosis, and Emerging Tools

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889193806 Year: Pages: 97 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-380-6 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Oncology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-03 13:02:24
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In the past decade, significant progresses have taken place in the field of cancer immunotherapy. Tumor-targeting immunotherapies are being developed for most human cancers, including melanoma, prostate cancer, glioblastoma, sarcoma, lung carcinoma and hepatocellular carcinoma. The FDA has approved multiple molecular immunotherapeutics, such as Ipilimumab; cellular immunotherapies (e.g. adoptive cell transfer) are being tested in phase II/III clinical trials. Immunotherapetics has evolved into a sophisticated field: Multimodal therapeutic regimens are administrated to induce focused responses, curtail side- effects and improve therapeutic efficacy. The lack of effective clinical assessment tools remains a major challenge. Because of the intricacy of antitumor response, it is essential to scrutinize individual tumor-targeting immune cells and their functions at the finest details - molecules. In this regard, flow cytometry analysis modernized hematology and allows characterization of surface molecular signature on individual cells. More recently, microchip technologies and new variations of cytometry have enormously expanded the spectrum, throughout and multiplexity of single cell analysis. Nowadays, tens of millions of readouts can be generated through the course of a cancer immunotherapy to monitor the abundance, phenotype and a myriad of effector functions of single immune cells. At the same time, big data analytics and data mining methodologies have been adapted to achieve sensible diagnostic interpretations. Such a marriage of technology and analytics opens the door for informative point-of-care assessment of therapeutic efficacy and ensures timely therapeutic decisions. The new generation of personalized clinical diagnostics will revolutionize healthcare in the years to come.

Self-Eating on Demand: Autophagy in Cancer and Cancer Therapy

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889454228 Year: Pages: 111 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-422-8 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Oncology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-11-16 17:17:57
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Macroautophagy, the major lysosomal pathway for recycling intracellular components including whole organelles, has emerged as a key process modulating tumorigenesis, tumor–stroma interactions, and cancer therapy. An impressive number of studies over the past decade have unraveled the plastic role of autophagy during tumor development and dissemination. The discoveries that autophagy may either support or repress neoplastic growth and contextually favor or weaken resistance and impact antitumor immunity have spurred efforts from many laboratories trying to conceptualize the complex role of autophagy in cancer using cellular and preclinical models. This complexity is further accentuated by recent findings highlighting that various autophagy-related genes have roles beyond this catabolic mechanism and interface with oncogenic pathways, other trafficking and degradation mechanisms and the cell death machinery. From a therapeutic perspective, knowledge of how autophagy modulates the tumor microenvironment is crucial to devise autophagy-targeting strategies using smart combination of drugs or anticancer modalities. This eBook contains a collection of reviews by autophagy researchers and provides a background to the state-of-the-art in the field of autophagy in cancer, focusing on various aspects of autophagy regulation ranging from its molecular components to its cell autonomous role, e.g. in cell division and oncogenesis, miRNAs regulation, cross-talk with cell death pathways as well as cell non-autonomous role, e.g. in secretion, interface with tumor stroma and clinical prospects of autophagy-based biomarkers and autophagy modulators in anticancer therapy. This eBook is part of the TransAutophagy initiative to better understand the clinical implications of autophagy in cancer.

Evolution of NK-mediated target recognition under the pressure of physiologic or pathologic stimuli

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889194520 Year: Pages: 190 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-452-0 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-02-05 17:24:33
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Since their discovery NK cells have come out as potential tools to fight cancer and viruses. This finding early urged different groups to study the mechanisms governing NK cell function. The identification of the MHC-I-specific inhibitory receptors (i.e. KIRs, NKG2A and certain Ly49 molecules) allowed defining rather rapidly how NK cells could avoid self-aggression and how they could be directed towards targets that were forced, by viral infection or tumor transformation, to down-regulate MHC-I expression. In a second time, also the repertoire of surface activating receptors addressing NK cytotoxicity towards tumors and pathogens was mostly defined. In spite of the first findings, however, most recent studies may suggest that NK cells and their receptors might not have been evolved to kill tumor targets and, perhaps, they might have been only partially influenced, in their evolution, by the need of recognizing viruses. Indeed certain NK receptors known to activate NK cell cytotoxicity (NKp30, DNAM-1, NKp80) can also participate at regulatory interactions occurring between NK and myeloid cells. In addition, a peculiar NK cell subset which intensively populate decidua during the first trimester of pregnancy, through the engagement of specific receptors and the interaction with decidual DC, produce chemokines and pro-angiogenic cytokines, and induce Tregs. Thus, in this context, NK cells favor decidua vascularization and development of the (semiallogeneic) foetus in a tolerant environment. Viruses have nevertheless played an important role in shaping the NK cell receptor repertoire. Several studies have unveiled clues of the evolutionary struggle between these pathogens and NK cells. Different NK receptors, including NKp46, NKp30, NKp44, NKG2D, NKG2C, Ly49, and certain KIRs have been demonstrated to recognize virus-encoded or virus-induced ligands. The expression of TLR specifically recognizing microbial products, together with the unexpected role of KIR3DL2 in shuttling these products to TLR-containing endosomes have also been documented in NK cells. On the other side, different viral immune evasion molecules have been shown to interfere with the expression of ligands for T or NK cell activating receptors. In addition, viral infections can occur in the reproductive stage of life cycle, and may represent a serious threat for the species propagation. Thus the control of viruses, together with the maintenance of foetus during pregnancy, should represent major evolutionary forces in shaping NK-receptors. Along this line, the NK-mediated control of tumors should not be under the same evolutionary pressure, as tumors mostly appear later in the life cycle, and the recognition of tumor-encoded ligands may be less efficient (as the NK cell receptors might have not been selected for such aim). This may be the reason why, although displaying strong antitumor activity in vitro, NK cells could hardly contain tumor burden in vivo. In addition the pathogen-driven evolution of NK cell function may also favor the role of NK cells in the insurgence of immune-mediated diseases. This research topic will collect contributions that may clarify the relationships between the evolution of the NK receptors and their role in an efficient recognition of viruses and tumor cells or in immune-mediated diseases.

Immunogenic Cell Death in Cancer: From Benchside Research to Bedside

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889198382 Year: Pages: 145 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-838-2 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Oncology
Added to DOAB on : 2017-02-07 16:12:31
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Classically, anti-cancer therapies have always been applied with the primary aim of tumor debulking achieved through widespread induction of cancer cell death. While the role of host immune system is frequently considered as host protective in various (antigen-bearing) pathologies or infections yet in case of cancer overtime it was proposed that the host immune system either plays no role in therapeutic efficacy or plays a limited role that is therapeutically unemployable. The concept that the immune system is dispensable for the efficacy of anticancer therapies lingered on for a substantial amount of time; not only because evidence supporting the claim that anti-cancer immunity played a role were mainly contradictory, but also largely because it was considered acceptable (and sometimes still is) to test anticancer therapies in immunodeficient mice (i.e. SCID/athymic mice lacking adaptive immune system). This latter practice played a detrimental role in appreciating the role of anticancer immunity in cancer therapy. This scenario is epitomized by the fact that for a long time the very existence of cancer-associated antigens or cancer-associated ‘danger signaling’ remained controversial. However, over last several years this dogmatic view has been considerably modified. The existence of cancer-associated antigens and ‘danger signaling’ has been proven to be incontrovertible. These developments have together paved way for the establishment of the attractive concept of “immunogenic cell death” (ICD). It has been established that a restricted class of chemotherapeutics/targeted therapeutics, radiotherapy, photodynamic therapy and certain oncolytic viruses can induce a form of cancer cell death called ICD which is accompanied by spatiotemporally defined emission of danger signals. These danger signals along with other factors help cancer cells undergoing ICD to activate host innate immune cells, which in turn activate T cell-based immunity that helps eradicate live (or residual) surviving cancer cells. The emergence of ICD has been marred by some controversy. ICD has been criticized to be either experimental model or setting-specific or mostly a concept based on rodent studies that may have very limited implications for clinical application. However, in recent times it has emerged (through mainly retrospective or prognostic studies) that ICD can work in various human clinical settings hinting towards clinical applicability of ICD. However a widespread consensus on this issue is still transitional. In the current Research Topic we aimed to organize and intensify a discussion that strives to bring together the academic and clinical research community in order to provide a background to the current state-of-the-art in ICD associated bench-side research and to initiate fruitful discussions on present and future prospects of ICD translating towards the clinical, bedside reality.

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