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The Practice of Philology in the Nineteenth-Century Netherlands

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Book Series: History of Science and Scholarship in the Netherlands ISBN: 9789048522033 9789089645913 Year: Pages: 280 Language: English
Publisher: Amsterdam University Press
Subject: Social Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2019-10-23 11:21:11
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Dutch scholarship has played an important role in philology since the early days of Leiden University. This volume illuminates how philology and its focus on the critical examination of classical texts—a tradition that had previously exerted considerable influence across fields as diverse as theology, astronomy, law, and politics—began an accelerated process of specialization in the 1800s. As former subareas like linguistics and history branched off into independent fields with their own methodologies, philology found its authority narrowing in scope within newly defined boundaries. Providing a fresh perspective on the evolution of Dutch philology as a discipline in the humanities, this is a fascinating look at a historically vital field of thought.

Speaking Power to Truth: Digital Discourse and the Public Intellectual

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Book Series: Cultural Dialectics ISSN: 19158378 ISBN: 9781771990332 9781771990349 9781771990356 9781771990363 Year: Pages: 216 DOI: 10.15215/aupress/9781771990332.01 Language: English
Publisher: Athabasca University Press
Subject: Political Science
Added to DOAB on : 2016-08-10 20:14:58
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Online discourse has created a new media environment for contributions to public life, one that challenges the social significance of the role of public intellectuals—intellectuals who, whether by choice or by circumstance, offer commentary on issues of the day. The value of such commentary is rooted in the assumption that, by virtue of their training and experience, intellectuals possess knowledge—that they understand what constitutes knowledge with respect to a particular topic, are able to distinguish it from mere opinion, and are in a position to define its relevance in different contexts. When intellectuals comment on matters of public concern, they are accordingly presumed to speak truth, whether they are writing books or op-ed columns or appearing as guests on radio and television news programs. At the same time, with increasing frequency, discourse on public life is taking place online. This new digital environment is characterized by abundance—an abundance of speakers, discussion, and access. But has this abundance of discourse—this democratization of knowledge, as some describe it—brought with it a corresponding increase in truth?Casting doubt on the assertion that online discourse, with its proliferation of voices, will somehow yield collective wisdom, Speaking Power to Truth raises concerns that this wealth of digitally enabled commentary is, in fact, too often bereft of the hallmarks of intellectual discourse: an epistemological framework and the provision of evidence to substantiate claims. Instead, the pursuit of truth finds itself in competition with the quest for public reputation, access to influence, and enhanced visibility. But as knowledge is drawn into the orbit of power, and as the line between knowledge and opinion is blurred, what role will the public intellectual play in the promotion and nurturing of democratic processes and goals? In exploring the implications of the digital transition, the contributors to Speaking Power to Truth provide both empirical evidence of, and philosophical reflection on, the current and future role of the public intellectual in a technologically mediated public sphere.

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2015 (2)