Search results: Found 6

Listing 1 - 6 of 6
Sort by
Translation and Openness

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9783902936882 9783902936882 Year: Pages: 222 DOI: 10.15203/2936-88-2 Language: English
Publisher: innsbruck university press
Subject: Computer Science --- Linguistics
Added to DOAB on : 2018-07-13 11:01:02
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

"Thinking about openness and implementing openness in our attitudes and actions have considerable bearing on our conception of ourselves as translators or researchers. Openness indeed questions the very role of translated texts, multilingual translation resources, the ethics of translators, their professional behavior, the self-conception of academics and researchers, as well as the role and availability of research results in society. It therefore constitutes one of the most stimulating challenges that the world of professional translation and translation studies have yet faced.
The contributions to this volume review some of these topics in three thematic sections: the first and most substantial part deals with the concept of openness in ICT (open data, open tools, open computer systems, and quality evaluation of open software), the middle part is concerned with translators training and the use of open software, and the last part discusses openness in academia on the ­basis of the concepts of a Scientist 2.0 and Digital Scholarship. An exhaustive list of ­references covering the topic is given as an appendix, as well as a keyword ­index."

Cotton Nero A.x: The Works of the "Pearl" Poet

Authors: --- --- ---
ISBN: 9780615983912 Year: Pages: 54 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0066.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:41
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Manuscript Cotton Nero A.x takes its designation from the unique cataloging system of seventeenth-century British antiquarian Sir Robert Cotton’s library: busts of historical figures atop shelves provided the organizing principle, such that one found this particular codex under the bust of Roman Emperor Nero, on the top shelf, ten volumes over. (Another famous manuscript, containing Beowulf, is called Cotton Vitellius A.xv.) Cotton Nero A.x contains the only versions of the poems we now know as Pearl, Cleanness, Patience, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, generally agreed to have been composed sometime in the latter half of the fourteenth century—the time of Piers Plowman and Geoffrey Chaucer, though radically different from either. No one knows who the poet was. No one knows if more than one poet wrote some or all of the poems. Together, they present a stunning array of themes, allegories, and images that critics continue to puzzle over: Patience offers a psychologically complex rendering of the Old Testament story of Jonah and the whale; Cleanness explores its homiletic theme in carnal and spiritual terms with complexity, irony, and even humor; Pearl provides a dream allegory that pushes at the distinction between its earthly and heavenly meanings, challenging the very notion of metaphysical transcendence its form seems to point towards. Finally, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the most secular of the poems, is a sophisticated take on Arthurian legend that unfolds like a psychosexual mystery novel, with no easy solution in sight. All the poems are rendered in a difficult Middle English dialect and intricate alliterative form, which sometimes involves a complex rhyme scheme as well. As poet-medievalists, we bow before the poetic achievement of the works in Cotton Nero A.x in all their multi-faceted richness. This is not a translation, nor an interpretation. It is what might be called a trace. A response. A homework assignment from beyond the grave, for four students who should have known better. A dream we hope to dream.

Memoir American

Author:
ISBN: 9780615808628 Year: Pages: 70 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0028.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:44
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

In the dead letter office, you will find a Memoir American. The texts which comprise it — forms of essay, talk, dialogue — at one time saw themselves as individualists who went somewhere (to small press magazines) on their own. Now they are here, collected with the chance of going nowhere together. As it should be: since they represent the fate of language and translation in the memory of aliens living inside America — like a family going nowhere together, but at home. The philosopher Jacques Derrida and his family are part of this family in the dead letter office, and curiously they are named going nowhere together at home. Along the way, so are the poets Charles Reznikoff and William Carlos Williams and Emmanuel Hocquard and Juliette Valery and Charles Olson, as well as Horace’s Odes in translation. You will find in this Memoir what it means for an alien to search for his family in a book outside the time of its writing. You will find him discovering that translation is a personal story and that poetry might not have a home without it. You will find him wondering: whose voices are these which we hear around us as we write, as Babel turns to rumor through the fact of translation, wherein a book is being made and remade from American to French and back again? You will find him through translation like a Being in the Poetry of the Extraterritorial, an un-owned territory which is neither French nor American but is negotiated by the rumor of a poetry which emerges from both, a future condition (État) which seeks the name it could be but is not.

Repetitions

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9780615851334 Year: Pages: 124 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0039.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Sports Science
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:43
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

In 1994, after following a character in Peter Handke’s novel Repetition into what is now Slovenia and after traveling in landscapes of Handke’s youth, Žarko Radaković and Scott Abbott published a two-headed text in Belgrade, Ponavljane, now published in English by punctum as Repetitions. The possibility of narration in two voices, complicated by the third voice that is Peter Handke’s own narrator, is the main focus of deliberation while traveling and reading and writing. Repetitions begins with Abbott’s text, a fairly straightforward travel narrative. It ends with Radaković’s account of the same events, much less straightforward, more repetitious, more adventuresome. Two aspects make the double-book unique. First, it represents experiences shared by two authors whose native languages are Serbian and English respectively (German is their only common language). The authors’ perspectives contrast with and supplement one another: Radaković grew up in Tito’s Yugoslavia and Abbott comes from the Mormon American West; Radaković is the translator of most of Peter Handke’s works into Serbo-Croatian and Abbott translated Handke’s provocative A Journey to the Rivers: Justice for Serbia for Viking Press and his play Voyage by Dugout: The Play of the Film of the War for PAJ (Performing Arts Journal); Radaković was a journalist for Deutsche Welle in Cologne and Abbott is a professor of German literature at Utah Valley University; Radaković is the author of several novels and Abbott has published mostly literary-critical work; and so on. Two sets of eyes. Two pens. Two visions of the world.

Beowulf: A Translation

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9780615612652 Year: Pages: 312 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0009.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:46
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Many modern Beowulf translations, while excellent in their own ways, suffer from what Kathleen Biddick might call “melancholy” for an oral and aural way of poetic making. By and large, they tend to preserve certain familiar features of Anglo-Saxon verse as it has been constructed by editors, philologists, and translators: the emphasis on caesura and alliteration, with diction and syntax smoothed out for readability. The problem with, and the paradox of this desired outcome, especially as it concerns Anglo-Saxon poetry, is that we are left with a document that translates an entire organizing principle based on oral transmission (and perhaps composition) into a visual, textual realm of writing and reading. The sense of loss or nostalgia for the old form seems a necessary and ever-present shadow over modern Beowulfs. What happens, however, when a contemporary poet, quite simply, doesn’t bother with any such nostalgia? When the entire organizational apparatus of the poem—instead of being uneasily approximated in modern verse form—is itself translated into a modern organizing principle, i.e., the visual text? This is the approach that poet Thomas Meyer takes; as he writes, [I]nstead of the text’s orality, perhaps perversely I went for the visual. Deciding to use page layout (recto/ verso) as a unit. Every translation I’d read felt impenetrable to me with its block after block of nearly uniform lines. Among other quirky decisions made in order to open up the text, the project wound up being a kind of typological specimen book for long American poems extant circa 1965. Having variously the “look” of Pound’s Cantos, Williams’ Paterson, or Olson or Zukofsky, occasionally late Eliot, even David Jones

Gender Trouble Couplets, Volume 1

Author:
ISBN: 9781950192519 9781950192526 Year: Pages: 14 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0266.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Gender Studies --- Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-11-13 11:21:02
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

"Judith Butler’s Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity radically claimed that the sexed body is a fallacy, discursively constructed by the performance of gender. A.W. Strouse has undertaken to rewrite Butler’s classic tome into an octosyllabic poem. Inspired by the rhyming encyclopedias of the Middle Ages, Strouse transforms each of Butler’s sentences into Seussian couplets.

This performative repetition of Chapter 1 of Butler’s Gender Trouble, “Subjects of Sex/Gender/Desire,” deconstructs Butler’s deconstruction. Relishing in the campiness of rhyme and meter—in the bodily pleasures of form—Strouse’s Gender Trouble Couplets, Volume 1 is an imitation for which there is no original. Gender Trouble, perhaps, was poetry all along."

Listing 1 - 6 of 6
Sort by
Narrow your search

Publisher

punctum books (5)

innsbruck university press (1)


License

CC by-nc-sa (6)


Language

english (6)


Year
From To Submit

2019 (1)

2015 (1)

2014 (1)

2013 (2)

2012 (1)