Search results: Found 3

Listing 1 - 3 of 3
Sort by
Sefer

Author:
Book Series: Mingling Voices ISSN: 19179413 ISBN: 9781927356029 9781927356036 9781927356043 Year: Pages: 157 Language: English
Publisher: Athabasca University Press
Added to DOAB on : 2013-07-15 10:35:10
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Poetic, witty, and ever so faintly surreal, Sefer delicately explores the legacy of the Holocaust for the postwar generation, a generation for whom a devastating history has grown distant, both temporally and emotionally. The novel’s protagonist, Jan Sefer, is a psychotherapist living in Vienna—someone whose professional life puts him in daily contact with the traumas of others but who has found it difficult to address his own family background, especially his memories of his father. During a two-week trip to his father’s birthplace, Kraków—a visit he has long postponed—he begins to sort out some of his feelings and to connect with a past the memory of which is swiftly disintegrating. Much like memory itself, Sefer speaks to us obliquely, through the juxtaposition of images and vignettes rather than through the construction of a linear narrative. With its fragmentary structure and its preference for hints rather than explanations, the novel belongs to the realm of the postmodern, while it also incorporates subtle elements of magical realism. One of Poland’s best-known poets, Ewa Lipska is today a major figure in European literature. In their translation of Sefer, Lipska’s first novel, translators Barbara Bogoczek and Tony Howard deftly capture the poet’s unmistakable voice—cool and precise, gently ironic, and deeply humane.

Keywords

Holocaust --- war

Letters From the Lost: A Memoir of Discovery

Author:
Book Series: Our Lives: Diary, Memoir, and Letters ISSN: 19216661 ISBN: 9781897425534 9781897425541 Year: Pages: 303 Language: English
Publisher: Athabasca University Press
Added to DOAB on : 2012-03-29 16:37:58
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

On March 15, 1939, Helen Waldstein’s father snatched his stamped exit visa from a distracted clerk to escape from Prague with his wife and child. As the Nazis closed in on a war-torn Czechoslovakia, only letters from their extended family could reach Canada through the barriers of conflict. The Waldstein family received these letters as they made their lives on a southern Ontario farm, where they learned to be Canadian and forget their Jewish roots. Helen Waldstein read these letters as an adult―this changed everything. As her past refused to keep silent, Helen followed the trail of the letters back to Europe, where she discovered living witnesses who could attest to the letters’ contents. She has here interwoven their stories and her own into a compelling narrative of suffering, survivor guilt, and overcoming intergenerational obstacles when exploring a traumatic past.

Keywords

Holocaust --- Judaism --- immigration --- World War II

The Wolves at My Shadow: The Story of Ingelore Rothschild

Author:
Book Series: Our Lives: Diary, Memoir, and Letters ISSN: 1921-6661; 1921-6653 ISBN: 9781771990615 9781771990639 9781771990646 Year: Pages: 325 DOI: 10.15215/aupress/9781771990615.01 Language: English
Publisher: Athabasca University Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2017-08-17 23:31:49
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Ingelore Rothschild was twelve years old when she was whisked out of her home in 1936. It was her first step on a cross-continent journey to Japan, where she and her parents sought refuge from rising anti-Semitism in Nazi Germany. A decade later, as she sails away from what has become her home in Kobe, Japan, Ingelore records her memories of life in Berlin, the long train journey through Russia, and her time in Japan during World War II.Each leg of the journey presents its own nightmare: passports are stolen, identities are uncovered, a mudslide tears through the Rothschild’s home, and the atomic bombs are dropped on Nagasaki and Hiroshima. Ingelore’s bright, observant nature and remarkable capacity for befriending those along her way fills her narrative with unique details about the people she meets and the places she travels to. The story of Ingelore and her prominent German Jewish family’s escape is an invaluable account that contributes to Holocaust witness and memoir literature. Although she was forever marked by her traumatic past, Ingelore’s survival story is a painful reminder that only European Jews with significant financial means were able to carefully orchestrate an escape from Nazi Germany.

Listing 1 - 3 of 3
Sort by
Narrow your search

Publisher

Athabasca University Press (3)


License

CC by-nc-nd (3)


Language

english (3)


Year
From To Submit

2017 (1)

2012 (1)

2010 (1)