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BOMB CANADA and Other Unkind Remarks in the American Media

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Book Series: Global Peace Studies ISSN: 19214030 ISBN: 9781897425497 9781897425503 Year: Pages: 157 Language: English
Publisher: Athabasca University Press
Added to DOAB on : 2012-03-29 16:37:58
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Canada and the United States. Two nations, one border, same continent. Anti-American sentiment in Canada is well documented, but what have Americans had to say about their northern neighbour? Allan examines how the American media has portrayed Canada, from Confederation to Obama’s election. By examining major events that have tested bilateral relations, Bomb Canada tracks the history of anti-Canadianism in the U.S. Informative, thought provoking and at times hilarious, this book reveals another layer of the complex relationship between Canada and the United States.

How Canadians Communicate V: Sports

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ISBN: 9781771990073 9781771990080 9781771990097 9781771990103 Year: Pages: 395 DOI: 10.15215/aupress/9781771990073.01 Language: English
Publisher: Athabasca University Press
Subject: Media and communication
Added to DOAB on : 2016-08-10 22:30:41
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Fewer Canadians than ever are lacing up skates, swimming lengths at the pool, practicing their curve ball, and experiencing the thrill of competition. However, despite a decline in active participation, Canadians spend enormous amounts of time and money on sports, as fans and followers of sporting events and sports culture. Never has media coverage of sports been more exhaustive, and never has it been more driven by commercial interests and the need to fuel consumerism, on which corporate profits depend. The power plays now occurring in the arena of sports are by no means solely a matter of money, however. At issue as well in the media capture of sports are the values that inform our daily lives, the physical and emotional health of the population, and the symbols so long central to a sense of Canadian identity.Writing from a variety of perspectives, the contributors to this collection set out to explore the impact of the media on our reception of, and attitudes toward, sports—to unpack the meanings that sports have for us as citizens and consumers. Well-known hockey writer Roy MacGregor delves into the influence of big media and big sports on the practice of objective journalism; Richard Gruneau examines the worrisome relationship between sports participation and socioeconomic class; blogger Derrick Newman investigates the impact of fantasy leagues on sports coverage; sociologist Harry Hiller looks at the iconic dimensions of the Vancouver Olympics. Other contributors shed light on the way in which the media serve to transform sports—including, of course, hockey—into a vehicle for the expression of identity and nationalism. Still others probe the function of sports as spectacle: the escalation of violence, controversies over drug use, and the media’s coverage of tragic deaths. The goal is not to score points but to prompt critical discussion of why sports matter in Canadian life and culture and how they contribute to the construction of Canadian identity.

Speaking Power to Truth: Digital Discourse and the Public Intellectual

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Book Series: Cultural Dialectics ISSN: 19158378 ISBN: 9781771990332 9781771990349 9781771990356 9781771990363 Year: Pages: 216 DOI: 10.15215/aupress/9781771990332.01 Language: English
Publisher: Athabasca University Press
Subject: Political Science
Added to DOAB on : 2016-08-10 20:14:58
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Online discourse has created a new media environment for contributions to public life, one that challenges the social significance of the role of public intellectuals—intellectuals who, whether by choice or by circumstance, offer commentary on issues of the day. The value of such commentary is rooted in the assumption that, by virtue of their training and experience, intellectuals possess knowledge—that they understand what constitutes knowledge with respect to a particular topic, are able to distinguish it from mere opinion, and are in a position to define its relevance in different contexts. When intellectuals comment on matters of public concern, they are accordingly presumed to speak truth, whether they are writing books or op-ed columns or appearing as guests on radio and television news programs. At the same time, with increasing frequency, discourse on public life is taking place online. This new digital environment is characterized by abundance—an abundance of speakers, discussion, and access. But has this abundance of discourse—this democratization of knowledge, as some describe it—brought with it a corresponding increase in truth?Casting doubt on the assertion that online discourse, with its proliferation of voices, will somehow yield collective wisdom, Speaking Power to Truth raises concerns that this wealth of digitally enabled commentary is, in fact, too often bereft of the hallmarks of intellectual discourse: an epistemological framework and the provision of evidence to substantiate claims. Instead, the pursuit of truth finds itself in competition with the quest for public reputation, access to influence, and enhanced visibility. But as knowledge is drawn into the orbit of power, and as the line between knowledge and opinion is blurred, what role will the public intellectual play in the promotion and nurturing of democratic processes and goals? In exploring the implications of the digital transition, the contributors to Speaking Power to Truth provide both empirical evidence of, and philosophical reflection on, the current and future role of the public intellectual in a technologically mediated public sphere.

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