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The New Russian Nationalism

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ISBN: 9781474410434 Year: Pages: 288 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_605858 Language: English
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched
Subject: Political Science
Added to DOAB on : 2016-04-10 11:01:24
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Assessing the transformation of Russian nationalist discourse in the 21st century Russian nationalism, previously dominated by ‘imperial’ tendencies – pride in a large, strong and multi-ethnic state able to project its influence abroad – is increasingly focused on ethnic issues. This new ethno-nationalism has come in various guises, like racism and xenophobia, but also in a new intellectual movement of ‘national democracy’ deliberately seeking to emulate conservative West European nationalism. Russia’s annexation of Crimea in 2014 and the subsequent violent conflict in Eastern Ukraine utterly transformed the nationalist discourse in Russia. This book provides an up-to-date survey of Russian nationalism as a political, social and intellectual phenomenon by leading Western and Russian experts in the field of nationalism studies. It includes case studies on migrantophobia; the relationship between nationalism and religion; nationalism in the media; nationalism and national identity in economic policy; nationalism in the strategy of the Putin regime as well as a survey-based study of nationalism in public opinion. This title was made Open Access by libraries from around the world through Knowledge Unlatched.

Keywords

politics --- history

Reinventing Liberty

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ISBN: 9781474402972 9781474402965 Year: Pages: 249 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_608322 Language: English
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2016-05-22 11:01:32
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Sir Walter Scott is often regarded as the first historical novelist. Reinventing Liberty challenges this view by returning us to the rich range of historical fiction written in the late 18th and early 19th century. For the first time placing these works in the context of British politics and British history writing, this book redefines the historical novel, revealing a genre which seeks to manage political change through historiographical experimentation. It explores how historical novelists participated in a contentious debate concerning the nature of commercial modernity, the formulation of political progress and British national identity. Ranging across well-known writers, like William Godwin, Horace Walpole and Frances Burney, to lesser-known figures, such as Cornelia Ellis Knight and Jane Porter, Reinventing Liberty uncovers how history becomes a site to rethink Britain as Ôland of libertyÕ. Reading Scott in relation to this tradition, Reinventing Liberty demonstrates the genreÕs troubled role in the construction of the myth of Britain as a nation of gradual, safe political change.

Keywords

literature --- history

The Jalayirids

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ISBN: 9781474402262 Year: Pages: 256 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_605040 Language: English
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2016-03-19 11:01:19
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This book traces the origins, history, and memory of the Jalayirid dynasty, a family that succeeded the Mongol Ilkhans in Iran and Iraq in the 14th and early 15th centuries. The story of how the Jalayirids came to power is illustrative of the political dynamics that shaped much of the Mongol and post-Mongol period in the Middle East. The Jalayirid sultans sought to preserve the social and political order of the Ilkhanate, while claiming that they were the rightful heirs to the rulership of that order. Central to the Jalayirids' claims to the legacy of the Ilkhanate was their attempt to control the Ilkhanid heartland of Azarbayjan and its major city, Tabriz. Control of Azarbayjan meant control of a network of long-distance trade between China and the Latin West, which continued to be a source of economic prosperity through the 8th/14th century. Azarbayjan also represented the center of Ilkhanid court life, whether in the migration of the mobile court-camp of the ruler, or in the complexes of palatial, religious and civic buildings constructed around the city of Tabriz by members of the Ilkhanid royal family, as well as by members of the military and administrative elite. This title was made Open Access by libraries from around the world through Knowledge Unlatched.

Keywords

islamic studies --- history

Women in Mongol Iran

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ISBN: 9781474415477 9781474423403 Year: DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_627004 Language: English
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 100041
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2017-04-07 11:02:07
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Explores the political, economic and religious role of women in the Mongol empireThis book shows the development of women’s status in the Mongol Empire from its original homeland in Mongolia up to the end of the Ilkhanate of Iran in 1335. Taking a thematic approach, the chapters show a coherent progression of this development and contextualise the evolution of the role of women in medieval Mongol society. The arrangement serves as a starting point from where to draw comparison with the status of Mongol women in the later period. Exploring patterns of continuity and transformation in the status of these women in different periods of the Mongol Empire as it expanded westwards into the Islamic world, the book offers a view on the transformation of a nomadic-shamanist society from its original homeland in Mongolia to its settlement in the mostly sedentary-Muslim Iran in the mid-13th century.

Universe and Inner Self in Early Indian and Early Greek Thought

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ISBN: 9781474410991 9781474411004 9781474411011 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 101061
Subject: Philosophy
Added to DOAB on : 2018-01-25 11:01:47
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From the sixth century BCE onwards there occurred a revolution in thought, with novel ideas such as such as that understanding the inner self is both vital for human well-being and central to understanding the universe. This intellectual transformation is sometimes called the beginning of philosophy. And it occurred – independently it seems - in both India and Greece, but not in the vast Persian Empire that divided them. How was this possible? This is a puzzle that has never been solved. This volume brings together Hellenists and Indologists representing a variety of perspectives on the similarities and differences between the two cultures, and on how to explain them. It offers a collaborative contribution to the burgeoning interest in the Axial Age and will be of interest to anyone intrigued by the big questions inspired by the ancient world.

Keywords

Classics --- History --- Ancient --- Greece --- Indian --- Philosophy

Imperial Muslims

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ISBN: 9780748697656 9780748697663 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 100960
Subject: Religion
Added to DOAB on : 2018-01-25 11:01:47
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A great deal has been written about the webs, nodes and networks created by Britain’s Indian Ocean Empire during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Much of the focus has been on the political, legal or economic consequences of empire; this book redresses the balance, devoting its attention to the personal and social. Using the British Settlement of Aden, it examines the development of a local Muslim community within the spaces created by imperial rule from the mid-nineteenth through mid-twentieth century. It explores how individuals from widely disparate backgrounds brought together by the networks of empire created a cohesive community utilizing the one commonality at their disposal: their faith. Specifically, it examines how religious institutions and spiritual ideas served as parameters for the creation of community and the kinds of symbolic and cultural capital an individual needed to attain communal membership and influence within the confines of imperial rule.

Prisons in the Late Ottoman Empire

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ISBN: 9780748641734 9780748677696 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 100964
Subject: Religion
Added to DOAB on : 2018-01-25 11:01:48
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Contrary to the stereotypical images of torture, narcotics and brutal sexual behaviour traditionally associated with Ottoman (or ‘Turkish’) prisons, Kent F. Schull argues that these places were sites of immense reform and contestation during the 19th century. He shows that they were key components for Ottoman nation-state construction and acted as 'microcosms of modernity' for broader imperial transformation. It was within the walls of these prisons that many of the pressing questions of Ottoman modernity were worked out, such as administrative centralisation, the rationalisation of Islamic criminal law and punishment, issues of gender and childhood, prisoner rehabilitation, bureaucratic professionalisation, identity and social engineering. Juxtaposing state-mandated reform with the reality of prison life, the author investigates how these reforms affected the lives of local prison officials and inmates.

Migrating Texts

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ISBN: 9781474438995 9781474439015 9781474439022 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 102447
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-07-03 11:21:05
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Explores translation in the context of the multi-lingual, multi-ethnic late-Ottoman Mediterranean world.Fénelon, Offenbach and the Iliad in Arabic, Robinson Crusoe in Turkish, the Bible in Greek-alphabet Turkish, excoriated French novels circulating through the Ottoman Empire in Greek, Arabic and Turkish: literary translation at the eastern end of the Mediterranean offered worldly vistas and new, hybrid genres to emerging literate audiences in the nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. Whether to propagate ‘national’ language reform, circulate the Bible, help audiences understand European opera, argue for girls’ education, institute pan-Islamic conversations, introduce political concepts, share the Persian Gulistan with Anglophone readers in Bengal, or provide racy fiction to schooled adolescents in Cairo and Istanbul, translation was an essential tool. But as these essays show, translators were inventors, and their efforts might yield surprising results.

Plague, Quarantines and Geopolitics in the Ottoman Empire

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ISBN: 9780748646593 9781474423397 Year: Pages: 208 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_625255 Language: English
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 100107
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2017-03-10 11:02:15
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Did you know that many of the greatest and most colourful Ottoman statesmen and literary figures from the 15th to the early 20th century considered plague as a grave threat to their empire? And did you know that many Ottomans applauded the establishment of a quarantine against the disease in 1838 as a tool to resist British and French political and commercial penetration? Or that later Ottoman sanitation effort to prevent urban outbreaks would help engender the Arab revolt against the empire in 1916? Birsen Bulmus explores these facts in an engaging study of Ottoman plague treatise writers throughout their almost 600-year struggle with this epidemic disease. Along the way, she addresses the political, economic and social consequences of the methods they used to combat it.

Moral History from Herodotus to Diodorus Siculus

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ISBN: 9781474411073 9781474433181 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 101044
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2018-01-25 11:01:48
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Why did human beings first begin to write history? Lisa Irene Hau argues that a driving force among Greek historians was the desire to use the past to teach lessons about the present and for the future. She uncovers the moral messages of the ancient Greek writers of history and the techniques they used to bring them across. Hau also shows how moral didacticism was an integral part of the writing of history from its inception in the 5th century BC, how it developed over the next 500 years in parallel with the development of historiography as a genre and how the moral messages on display remained surprisingly stable across this period. For the ancient Greek historiographers, moral didacticism was a way of making sense of the past and making it relevant to the present; but this does not mean that they falsified events: truth and morality were compatible and synergistic ends.

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