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Changing the Victorian Subject

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ISBN: 9781922064745 Year: Pages: 292 DOI: 10.20851/victorian-subject Language: English
Publisher: University of Adelaide Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2014-07-04 04:46:33
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The essays in this collection examine how both colonial and British authors engage with Victorian subjects and subjectivities in their work. Some essays explore the emergence of a key trope within colonial texts: the negotiation of Victorian and settler-subject positions. Others argue for new readings of key metropolitan texts and their repositioning within literary history. These essays work to recognise the plurality of the rubric of the 'Victorian' and to expand how the category of Victorian studies can be understood.

Six Eclogues from William Barnes's Poems of Rural Life in the Dorset Dialect (First Collection, 1844)

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ISBN: 9780987073082 Year: Pages: 62 DOI: 10.1017/UPO9780987073082 Language: English
Publisher: University of Adelaide Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2012-05-15 02:52:56
License: University of Adelaide Press

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When William Barnes began publishing poems in the Dorset County Chronicle in the 1830s in the dialect of his native Blackmore Vale, the first poems that appeared were in the form of eclogues — dialogues between country people on country matters. Although an immediate success, the eclogues were in time overshadowed by the many lyric poems that Barnes published in the dialect. They are now perhaps the most undervalued works by this brilliant but neglected poet. Each eclogue is, effectively, a one-scene play, demanding performance for its potential to be realized. The phonemic transcripts in this book, based on the findings in T. L. Burton’s William Barnes’s Dialect Poems: A Pronunciation Guide (2010), show what the poems would have sounded like in Barnes’s own time; the accompanying audio recordings (made at the 2010 Adelaide Fringe) give living voice to the sounds noted in the transcripts.

The Sound of William Barnes's Dialect Poems: 1. Poems of Rural Life in the Dorset Dialect, first collection (1844)

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ISBN: 9781922064493 Year: Volume: 1 Pages: 594 DOI: 10.20851/barnes-vol-1 Language: English
Publisher: University of Adelaide Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2013-04-16 09:13:43
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This series, developed from Tom Burton’s groundbreaking study, William Barnes’s Dialect Poems: A Pronunciation Guide (The Chaucer Studio Press, 2010), sets out to demonstrate for the first time what all of Barnes’s dialect poems would have sounded like in the pronunciation of his own time and place. Every poem is accompanied by a facing-page phonemic transcript and by an audio recording freely available from this website.

The Sound of William Barnes's Dialect Poems: 2. Poems of Rural Life in the Dorset Dialect, second collection (1859)

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ISBN: 9781925261509 Year: DOI: 10.20851/barnes-vol-2 Language: English
Publisher: University of Adelaide Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2017-06-02 11:01:58
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"This is the second volume in a series that sets out to provide a phonemic transcript and an audio recording of each individual poem in Barnes’s three collections of Poems of Rural Life in the Dorset Dialect. Beginning with two poems that inspired Vaughan Williams to set them to music, and ending with a paean of praise for the poet’s native county, this second collection contains 105 poems of immense range and power. There are poems of longing, love, and loss; pain and protest; tears and laughter; grief and consolation; feasting and celebration; music and birdsong; falsehood, friendship, and faith; generosity and meanness; bad temper and good; stasis and travel; flowers and trees; storm and calm. “Here,” as Dryden said of Chaucer’s poems, “is God’s plenty”."

The Sound of William Barnes's Dialect Poems: 3. Poems of Rural Life in the Dorset Dialect, third collection (1862)

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ISBN: 9781925261585 Year: DOI: 10.20851/barnes-vol-3 Language: English
Publisher: University of Adelaide Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2017-09-30 11:01:45
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"This is the third volume in a series that sets out to provide a phonemic transcript and an audio recording of each individual poem in Barnes’s three collections of Poems of Rural Life in the Dorset Dialect. With 96 poems in an astonishing variety of metrical forms, the volume includes some of those that are most loved and admired: poems of tragedy (“Woak Hill”, “The turnstile”) and comedy (“John Bloom in Lon’on”, “A lot o’ maïdens a-runnèn the vields”); celebrations of love anticipated (“In the spring”) and love fulfilled (“Don’t ceäre”); protests against injustice and snobbery (“The love child”); struggles to accept God’s will (“Grammer a-crippled”); and poems on numerous other subjects, with an emotional range stretching from the deepest of grief to the highest of joy."

Empire Girls: the colonial heroine comes of age

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ISBN: 9781922064554 Year: Pages: 280 DOI: 10.20851/empire-girls Language: English
Publisher: University of Adelaide Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2014-05-07 06:02:24
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Empire Girls: the colonial heroine comes of age is a critical examination of three novels by writers from different regions of the British Empire: Olive Schreiner’s The Story of An African Farm (South Africa), Sara Jeannette Duncan’s A Daughter of Today (Canada) and Henry Handel Richardson’s The Getting of Wisdom (Australia). All three novels commence as conventional Bildungsromane, yet the plots of all diverge from the usual narrative structure, as a result of both their colonial origins and the clash between their aspirational heroines and the plots available to them. In an analysis including gender, empire, nation and race, Empire Girls provides new critical perspectives on the ways in which this dominant narrative form performs very differently when taken out of its metropolitan setting.

Tilting at Windmills: the literary magazine in Australia, 1968-2012

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ISBN: 9781925261059 Year: DOI: 10.20851/windmills Language: English
Publisher: University of Adelaide Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2015-03-02 06:39:53
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Up until the late 1960s the story of Australian literary magazines was one of continuing struggle against the odds, and of the efforts of individuals, such as Clem Christesen, Stephen Murray-Smith, and Max Harris. During that time, the magazines played the role of 'enfant terrible', creating a space where unpopular opinions and writers were allowed a voice. The magazines have very often been ahead of their time and some of the agendas they have pursued have become 'central' to representations, where once they were marginal. Broadly, 'little' magazines have often been more influential than their small circulations would first indicate, and the author's argument is that they have played a valuable role in the promotion of Australian literature.

Framing French Culture

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ISBN: 9781922064875 Year: Pages: 291 DOI: 10.20851/framing-french Language: English
Publisher: University of Adelaide Press
Subject: Social Sciences --- Languages and Literatures --- Performing Arts
Added to DOAB on : 2015-09-08 04:26:04
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Throughout this book, the concept of framing is used to look at art, photography, scientific drawings and cinema as visually constituted, spatially bounded productions. The way these genres relate to that which exists beyond the frame, by means of plastic, chemically transposed, pencil-sketched or moving images allows us to decipher the particular language of the visual and at the same time circumscribe the dialectic between presence and absence that is proper to all visual media. Yet, these kinds of re-framing owe their existence to the ruptures and upheavals that marked the demise of certain discursive systems in the past, announcing the emergence of others that were in turn overturned.

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