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Mallarmé devant ses contemporains

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ISBN: 9780980723076 Year: Pages: 153 DOI: 10.20851/mallarme Language: French
Publisher: University of Adelaide Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2012-05-14 09:42:33
License: University of Adelaide Press

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The enigmatic nature of Mallarmé’s works disconcerted his first readers and they were published at a period when the number of newspaper and periodicals was rapidly increasing. In the last quarter of the 19th century many comments on his writings appeared in print, some were laudatory, others claimed that he wished to found a poetic School of the Unintelligible. Today’s reader will find gathered here reviews published when individual works first appeared and critical texts on his work in general. Among the aspects of his influence on his contemporaries which have been little known hitherto are the reactions of those who heard the first performances of Debussy’s Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun in 1894 and 1895, and the use that was made of Mallarmé’s name in aesthetic and political polemics at the time, associating him with Odilon Redon or Émile Zola. Some of his utterances made at the celebrated Mardis are also recorded here.

Six Eclogues from William Barnes's Poems of Rural Life in the Dorset Dialect (First Collection, 1844)

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ISBN: 9780987073082 Year: Pages: 62 DOI: 10.1017/UPO9780987073082 Language: English
Publisher: University of Adelaide Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2012-05-15 02:52:56
License: University of Adelaide Press

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When William Barnes began publishing poems in the Dorset County Chronicle in the 1830s in the dialect of his native Blackmore Vale, the first poems that appeared were in the form of eclogues — dialogues between country people on country matters. Although an immediate success, the eclogues were in time overshadowed by the many lyric poems that Barnes published in the dialect. They are now perhaps the most undervalued works by this brilliant but neglected poet. Each eclogue is, effectively, a one-scene play, demanding performance for its potential to be realized. The phonemic transcripts in this book, based on the findings in T. L. Burton’s William Barnes’s Dialect Poems: A Pronunciation Guide (2010), show what the poems would have sounded like in Barnes’s own time; the accompanying audio recordings (made at the 2010 Adelaide Fringe) give living voice to the sounds noted in the transcripts.

Tilting at Windmills: the literary magazine in Australia, 1968-2012

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ISBN: 9781925261059 Year: DOI: 10.20851/windmills Language: English
Publisher: University of Adelaide Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2015-03-02 06:39:53
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Up until the late 1960s the story of Australian literary magazines was one of continuing struggle against the odds, and of the efforts of individuals, such as Clem Christesen, Stephen Murray-Smith, and Max Harris. During that time, the magazines played the role of 'enfant terrible', creating a space where unpopular opinions and writers were allowed a voice. The magazines have very often been ahead of their time and some of the agendas they have pursued have become 'central' to representations, where once they were marginal. Broadly, 'little' magazines have often been more influential than their small circulations would first indicate, and the author's argument is that they have played a valuable role in the promotion of Australian literature.

If I say If: The Poems and Short Stories of Boris Vian

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ISBN: 9781922064622 Year: Pages: 412 DOI: 10.20851/vian-if Language: English
Publisher: University of Adelaide Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2014-06-23 06:27:57
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Boris Vian is a rare phenomenon. Nothing short of a national treasure in France, he is hardly known overseas. In his lifetime, he divided literary opinion with masterpieces that failed to sell and best sellers that caused outrage, trials and even deaths, including his own. As an impresario, he became the figurehead of the jazz scene that marked the French left bank at the end of the Second World War and was responsible for bringing Duke Ellington and Miles Davis to France. As a musician, he played his trumpet against the advice of cardiologists, sang pacifist songs before audiences of outraged patriots and, in passing, created French rock ‘n’ roll. Posthumously, he became known for his theatre, film scripts and poetry as well as for his novels. And in May ’68 he became a revolutionary icon.

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