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A Neo Tropical Companion

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ISBN: 9789081709149 Year: Pages: 162 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0217.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-03-29 11:21:08
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A Neo Tropical Companion is the first collection of haikus written by Xiu Xiu singer, Jamie Stewart. This is the first time his haikus, which have been featured in several literary journals and small press releases, will be comprehensively collected. Two thirds of the work will include new poems written for specifically for this book. The title, A Neo Tropical Companion, comes from an antiquated guide book to North East South America that Stewart found molding on the ground in the jungle. The poems, written in the classical Japanese poetry form, concern death, uncertainty, cats, being on weird tours, horrible sex, hating other people, bird watching in Guyana, and growing up in a dim and boxed-in valley.

The Metabolism of Desire: The Poetry of Guido Cavalcanti

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Book Series: Mingling Voices ISSN: 19179413 ISBN: 9781926836843 9781926836850 9781926836867 Year: Pages: 149 Language: English
Publisher: Athabasca University Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2012-07-11 08:18:41
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The fact that Cavlacanti?s friend, Dante Alighieri, was a supremely fine poet ought not blind us to Cavalcanti?s own, rather different excellence. Both men were attracted to the dolce stil nuovo, the ?sweet new style? that emerged in thirteenth-century Florence. While Dante?s poetry was devoted to his childhood sweetheart, Beatrice, Cavalcanti?s poetry had more the tang of real-world experience: he struggled against unruly passions and sought instead to overcome love ? a source of torment and despair. It is chiefly through the translations of Rossetti and Pound that English-speaking readers have encountered Cavalcanti?s work. Pound?s famous translation, now viewed by some as antiquated, is remarkably different from the translation provided here in the graceful voice of poet David Slavitt. Working under the significant restraints of Cavalcanti?s elaborate formal structures, Slavitt renders an English translation faithful to the original poetry in both rhyme and rhythm.

Keywords

Poetry --- Renaissance --- Italian --- Translations

Beowulf: A Translation

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ISBN: 9780615612652 Year: Pages: 312 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0009.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:46
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Many modern Beowulf translations, while excellent in their own ways, suffer from what Kathleen Biddick might call “melancholy” for an oral and aural way of poetic making. By and large, they tend to preserve certain familiar features of Anglo-Saxon verse as it has been constructed by editors, philologists, and translators: the emphasis on caesura and alliteration, with diction and syntax smoothed out for readability. The problem with, and the paradox of this desired outcome, especially as it concerns Anglo-Saxon poetry, is that we are left with a document that translates an entire organizing principle based on oral transmission (and perhaps composition) into a visual, textual realm of writing and reading. The sense of loss or nostalgia for the old form seems a necessary and ever-present shadow over modern Beowulfs. What happens, however, when a contemporary poet, quite simply, doesn’t bother with any such nostalgia? When the entire organizational apparatus of the poem—instead of being uneasily approximated in modern verse form—is itself translated into a modern organizing principle, i.e., the visual text? This is the approach that poet Thomas Meyer takes; as he writes, [I]nstead of the text’s orality, perhaps perversely I went for the visual. Deciding to use page layout (recto/ verso) as a unit. Every translation I’d read felt impenetrable to me with its block after block of nearly uniform lines. Among other quirky decisions made in order to open up the text, the project wound up being a kind of typological specimen book for long American poems extant circa 1965. Having variously the “look” of Pound’s Cantos, Williams’ Paterson, or Olson or Zukofsky, occasionally late Eliot, even David Jones

Ostranenie: On Shame and Knowing

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ISBN: 9780615744797 Year: Pages: 50 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0019.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:45
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Ostranenie, the term for defamiliarization introduced by Russian writer and critic Victor Shklovsky, means, among other things, to see in strangeness. To see in strangeness is to participate in an illusion that is more real than real. It may be achieved by (re)presenting the surface as the substance, the play as the thing, or by examining (from exigere: to drive out) what is present before one’s eyes. Ultimately, ostranenie means confessing one’s complicity in making known what is known. M.H. Bowker’s Ostranenie: On Shame and Knowing is a meditation upon the moment of a mother’s death: a moment of defamiliarization in several senses. The body of the work consists of footnotes which elaborate, by exegesis, by parataxis, and sometimes by surprise, the intimate and often hidden relationships between parent and child, illusion and knowledge, shame and loss. These elaborations raise questions about the power of the familiar, the limitations of discursive thought, and the paradoxical nature of the interpersonal, political, and spiritual bargains we make for the sake of security and freedom.

Keywords

memoir --- family --- therapy --- shame --- poetry

Huisbeelden in de moderne Nederlandstalige poëzie

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Book Series: Lage Landen Studies ISBN: 9789038220864 Year: Pages: 381 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_466592 Language: Dutch;
Publisher: Academia Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures --- Arts in general --- Psychology --- Social Sciences --- History of arts --- Performing Arts
Added to DOAB on : 2014-02-10 15:05:11
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This book explores images of the house in Dutch-language poetry from the postwar period. On the one hand the archetypical notion of the house has always had an established place in poetry. It is connected to the meaning of house as a building, but even more so as an imaginative house or a home. On the other hand the house is a rich metaphorical concept that is often used for expressing poetical ideas. In a historical survey of modern Dutch-language poetry different images of the house are presented. The overview shows that the choice of certain metaphorical concepts is connected to literary and extra literary contexts, and to the poetical ideas of poets. Conceptual integration – blending theory – is used throughout this book as a theoretical frame. From this perspective poems are regarded as a complex blend, a network of connections which are constructed during the reading and interpreting processes. Finally, the book shows how metaphorical blends are integrated in concrete poems and which kind of house images result from this process.

Keywords

imagery --- the netherlands --- poetry --- house --- flanders

Dark Chaucer: An Assortment

Authors: --- ---
ISBN: 9780615701073 Year: Pages: 224 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0018.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:45
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Although widely beloved for its playfulness and comic sensibility, Chaucer’s poetry is also subtly shot through with dark moments that open into obscure and irresolvably haunting vistas, passages into which one might fall head-first and never reach the abyssal bottom, scenes and events where everything could possibly go horribly wrong or where everything that matters seems, if even momentarily, altogether and irretrievably lost. And then sometimes, things really do go wrong. Opting to dilate rather than cordon off this darkness, this volume assembles a variety of attempts to follow such moments into their folds of blackness and horror, to chart their endless sorrows and recursive gloom, and to take depth soundings in the darker recesses of the Chaucerian lakes in order to bring back palm- or bite-sized pieces (black jewels) of bitter Chaucer that could be shared with others . . . an “assortment,” if you will. Not that this collection finds only emptiness and non-meaning in these caves and lakes. You never know what you will discover in the dark.

Annotations to Geoffrey Hill's Speech! Speech!

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ISBN: 9781468129847 Year: Pages: 282 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0004.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:46
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Geoffrey Hill’s Speech! Speech! (2000) encapsulates two thousand years’ worth of utterances in a symbolic act of remembrance and expression of despair for the current age, in which we find “our minds and ears fouled by degraded public speech—by media hype, insipid sermons, hollow political rhetoric, and the ritual misuse of words.” Through 120 densely allusive stanzas—“As many as the days that were | of SODOM”—the poem wrestles this condition from within, fighting fire with fire in an alchemical symbolic labour that transmutes the dross of corrupt and clichéd idiom into a dynamic logopoeia which proves true Hill’s persistent claim: “genuinely difficult art is truly democratic.” Such is the weird, ambivalently hostile position of poetry in the present world and thus the space of our real connection to it: “Whatever strange relationship we have with the poem, it is not one of enjoyment. It is more like being brushed past, or aside, by an alien being” (Hill). Befriending this estrangement, embracing it as a more amicable brushing-up-against, Hassan’s Annotations is a thorough and patient explication of Speech! Speech! that both clarifies and deepens the poem’s difficulties, illuminating its polyphonic language and careening discursive movement. The author’s method is at once commentarial, descriptive, and narratorial, staying faithfully with the poem and following its complex verbal and logical turns. The book generously provides, rather than direct interpretative incursion, a more durable and productive document of “the true nature / of this achievement” (stanza 92), a capacious, open understanding of the text that will prove invaluable to its present and future readers.

Geschichte der italienischen Literatur in Österreich

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ISBN: 9783205787297 Year: Pages: 338 Seiten DOI: 10.26530/oapen_437165 Language: German
Publisher: Böhlau Grant: Austrian Science Fund - D 4295
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2013-03-27 11:49:03
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The present monograph focuses on the history of Italian literature and language in Austria's Habsburg past, covering the period from the Peace of Campoformido between Napoleon and Francis II in 1797 to the end of the Habsburg monarchy in 1918. The study reveals that Italian court poetry was amazingly alive in the 19th century as it gradually had been adapted to the changes in the fields of politics, society, and the press. After analyzing the end of the golden era of Italian poetry in Austria, the author presents Archduchess Maria Beatrice d'Este and her literary circle. She was the last patroness of Italian artists and poets and kept up the old-style tradition of court poetry until her death in 1829. During the 19th century, however, this tradition faced an ever increasing popularization, with Italian language books and instruction getting more and more common. The Italian language was never discriminated against in the Habsburg monarchy. On the contrary, it was even extensively taught at universities because officials with a good command of Italian were needed both in the federal government and in the Italian regions of the monarchy. Moreover, the Habsburgs' language policy favored the publication of quality papers and literary magazines in Italian. The study also deals with Italian school books and anthologies for schools in the Italian parts of the monarchy, which were usually written and published in Vienna. In the last part of this chapter, records of the future Emperor Franz Joseph's Italian instruction are presented and analyzed on the basis of archive materials. Anachronistically, court poetry survived the 1848/1849 revolution and continued until World War I. The Emperor was popularized in jubilee editions, newspapers, and ceremonies, but also in the Italian poetry which was no longer of high quality, but still instrumental in presenting Franz Joseph as the "father of the nation".

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2012 (8)