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How the Computer went to School

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Book Series: Education ISBN: 9781922235169 9781925523850 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Monash University Publishing Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 102630
Subject: Education
Added to DOAB on : 2019-03-15 11:21:02
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For more than 30 years, certain governments, individuals and organisations have actively promoted computers as learning technologies. Enormous amounts of money and time have been spent promoting specific kinds of educational computing, and policies by which these might be implemented. The view that computers can enhance student learning has gained broad acceptance. The computers should not automatically be associated with success in schools. The view that all school children will benefit equally from access to computers overlooks inequities associated with differing patterns of use. How the Computer Went to School gives an account of the origins and development of the computer industry in the United States and shows how these influenced educational computing in both the US and Australia. It explores government policy that prioritises the economic benefits of educational computing for the nation and questions the proper role of the computer in education more generally.

Preparing for Life in a Digital Age: The IEA International Computer and Information Literacy Study International Report

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ISBN: 9783319142210 9783319142227 Year: Volume: 1 Pages: 308 DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-14222-7 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature
Subject: Social Sciences --- Education --- Business and Management --- Computer Science
Added to DOAB on : 2015-07-24 16:52:32
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Ability to use information and communication technologies (ICT) is an imperative for effective participation in today’s digital age. Schools worldwide are responding to the need to provide young people with that ability. But how effective are they in this regard? The IEA International Computer and Information Literacy Study (ICILS) responded to this question by studying the extent to which young people have developed computer and information literacy (CIL), which is defined as the ability to use computers to investigate, create and communicate with others at home, school, the workplace and in society.The study was conducted under the auspices of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) and builds on a series of earlier IEA studies focusing on ICT in education.Data were gathered from almost 60,000 Grade 8 students in more than 3,300 schools from 21 education systems. This information was augmented by data from almost 35,000 teachers in those schools and by contextual data collected from school ICT-coordinators, school principals and the ICILS national research centers.The IEA ICILS team systematically investigated differences among the participating countries in students’ CIL outcomes, how participating countries were providing CIL-related education and how confident teachers were in using ICT in their pedagogical practice. The team also explored differences within and across countries with respect to relationships between CIL education outcomes and student characteristics and school contexts.In general, the study findings presented in this international report challenge the notion of young people as “digital natives” with a self-developed capacity to use digital technology. The large variations in CIL proficiency within and across the ICILS countries suggest it is naive to expect young people to develop CIL in the absence of coherent learning programs. Findings also indicate that system- and school-level planning needs to focus on increasing teacher expertise in using ICT for pedagogical purposes if such programs are to have the desired effect.The report furthermore presents an empirically derived scale and description of CIL learning that educational stakeholders can reference when deliberating about CIL education and use to monitor change in CIL over time.

Opening Science: The Evolving Guide on How the Internet is Changing Research, Collaboration and Scholarly Publishing

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ISBN: 9783319000251 9783319000268 Year: Pages: 339 DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-00026-8 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature
Subject: Education --- Computer Science
Added to DOAB on : 2014-01-13 10:39:36
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Modern information and communication technologies, together with a cultural upheaval within the research community, have profoundly changed research in nearly every aspect. Ranging from sharing and discussing ideas in social networks for scientists to new collaborative environments and novel publication formats, knowledge creation and dissemination as we know it is experiencing a vigorous shift towards increased transparency, collaboration and accessibility. Many assume that research workflows will change more in the next 20 years than they have in the last 200. This book provides researchers, decision makers, and other scientific stakeholders with a snapshot of the basics, the tools, and the underlying visions that drive the current scientific (r)evolution, often called ‘Open Science.’

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