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Amici - socii - clientes? Abhängige Herrschaft im Imperium Romanum

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Book Series: Berlin Studies of the Ancient World ISBN: 9783981675115 Year: Volume: 31 Pages: 362 Language: German
Publisher: Edition Topoi
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-17 15:55:08
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Abstract

Das Imperium Romanum war kein ‚Staat‘ im modernen Sinne, sondern ein diffuses Gebilde mit unterschiedlichen Substrukturen. Dazu zählten auch die amici et socii: Könige, Fürsten, Städte, nationes, gentes, die mit Rom engere oder weitere Bindungen eingingen. Diese ‚Klientelstaaten‘ werden aus römischer wie regionaler Perspektive anhand von Fallbeispielen, aber auch anhand von inhaltlichen Aspekten in den Blick genommen. Es geht dabei nicht um eine abschließende Beantwortung moderner Fragestellungen, sondern um die Förderung eines Dialoges unterschiedlicher Ansätze und Blickwinkel zum Thema ‚Klientelkönigtum‘. Der vorliegende Band versammelt Beiträge, die die generelle Tragfähigkeit des Klientel-Konzepts, Unterschiede und Gemeinsamkeiten zwischen dem Osten und Westen des Imperiums und ihre Auswirkungen auf die lokalen Reiche und Gemeinden diskutieren und damit die Entwicklungen ebenso wie die Bandbreite des Instruments der abhängigen Herrschaft und ihrer modernen Deutung deutlich machen.

Keywords

Roman empire

Hidden Criticism?

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ISBN: 9783161537950 9783161537967 Year: DOI: 10.1628/978-3-16-153796-7 Language: English
Publisher: Mohr Siebeck Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 103698
Subject: Religion
Added to DOAB on : 2019-05-14 11:21:02
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Is there a counter-imperial message beneath the surface of the text in Paul? Christoph Heilig analyzes the letters of the apostle and concludes that the hypothesis that we can identify critical »echoes« of the Roman Empire in Paul's letters needs to be modified for it to be maintained.

Writing Self, Writing Empire: Chandar Bhan Brahman and the Cultural World of the Indo-Persian State Secretary

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Book Series: South Asia Across the Disciplines ISBN: 9780520286467 9780520961685 Year: Pages: 394 DOI: 10.1525/luminos.3 Language: English
Publisher: University of California Press
Subject: Languages and Literatures --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2016-02-14 11:01:05
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"Writing Self, Writing Empire examines the life, career, and writings of the Mughal state secretary, or munshi, Chandar Bhan Brahman (d. ca. 1670), one of the great Indo-Persian poets and prose stylists of early modern South Asia. Chandar Bhan’s life spanned the reigns of four emperors: Akbar (1556–1605), Jahangir (1605–1627), Shah Jahan (1628–1658), and Aurangzeb ‘Alamgir (1658–1707), the last of the “Great Mughals” whose courts dominated the culture and politics of the subcontinent at the height of the empire’s power, territorial reach, and global influence. Chandar Bhan was a high-caste Hindu who worked for a series of Muslim monarchs and other officials, forming powerful friendships along the way; his experience bears vivid testimony to the pluralistic atmosphere of the Mughal court, particularly during the reign of Shah Jahan, the celebrated builder of the Taj Mahal. But his widely circulated and emulated works also touch on a range of topics central to our understanding of the court’s literary, mystical, administrative, and ethical cultures, while his letters and autobiographical writings provide tantalizing examples of early modern Indo-Persian modes of self-fashioning. Chandar Bhan’s oeuvre is a valuable window onto a crucial, though surprisingly neglected, period of Mughal cultural and political history."

Society, Law, and Culture in the Middle East. “Modernities” in the Making

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9783110439755 9783110470642 Year: Pages: 176 DOI: 10.1515/9783110439755 Language: English
Publisher: De Gruyter
Subject: Sociology --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-06 13:27:03
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Society, Law, and Culture in the Middle East: “Modernities” in the Making is an edited volume that seeks to deepen and broaden our understanding of various forms of change in Middle Eastern and North African societies during the Ottoman period. It offers an in-depth analysis of reforms and gradual change in the longue durée, challenging the current discourse on the relationship between society, culture, and law. The focus of the discussion shifts from an external to an internal perspective, as agency transitions from “the West” to local actors in the region. Highlighting the ongoing interaction between internal processes and external stimuli, and using primary sources in Arabic and Ottoman Turkish, the authors and editors bring out the variety of modernities that shaped south-eastern Mediterranean history. The first part of the volume interrogates the urban elite household, the main social, political, and economic unit of networking in Ottoman societies. The second part addresses the complex relationship between law and culture, looking at how the legal system, conceptually and practically, undergirded the socio-cultural aspects of life in the Middle East. Society, Law, and Culture in the Middle East consists of eleven chapters, written by well-established and younger scholars working in the field of Middle East and Islamic Studies. The editors, Dror Ze'evi and Ehud R. Toledano, are both leading historians, who have published extensively on Middle Eastern societies in the Ottoman and post-Ottoman periods.

Abwesenheit von Rom: Aristokratische Interaktion in der späten römischen Republik und in der frühen Kaiserzeit

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ISBN: 9783946054016 9783946054009 9783946054023 Year: Pages: 362 DOI: 10.17885/heiup.43.32 Language: German
Publisher: Heidelberg University Publishing (heiUP)
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2016-12-21 15:55:22
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Abstract

The immense ideological significance that the city of Rome held since the times of the late republic corresponded until the 2nd century AD with the actual supremacy of the urbs within the Imperium Romanum: Rome was the place where socially and politically influential players and groups met; it was where they tried to create an atmosphere of mutual understanding and agreement through complex ways of interaction. Until well into the imperial era the senatorial aristocracy considered the interacting presence of Rome as a major constant of their lifestyle. At least until the 1st century AD the emperors could not disengage themselves from the reference framework that the city was. Therefore, the forms and the reasons for aristocratic and imperial absence are of particular interest. Which role the absence of Rome played in the system of aristocratic interaction and which implications it had for politics and the society of the late republic and the early imperial era is the subject of the present study. Astrid Habenstein's work was awarded by the Historical Institute at the University of Bern with the prize for the best PhD-thesis in 2012.

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