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Diverse functions of mucosal resident memory T cells

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889195398 Year: Pages: 86 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-539-8 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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Early studies recognized the unique phenotype and attributes of T cells found in mucosal tissues, such as the intestines, skin, lung and female reproductive tract. This special topic issue will cover many aspects of mucosal-resident T cell biology during infection and disease and is dedicated to Leo Lefrancois, a pioneer in this field who recently passed away. A major proportion of these mucosal T cells are memory T cells, now recognized as a major constituent of memory T cells referred to as tissue-resident memory T cells. Unlike central and effector memory T cell subsets, tissue-resident memory T cells exhibit tissue specificity with minimal systemic migration. Nonetheless, tissue-resident memory T cells share a similar origin and display some overlapping phenotypes with their other memory T cell counterparts. Articles in this issue will describe the different types of memory T cells residing in mucosal tissues, their origins and functions as well as how they vary among discrete mucosal sites. Manuscripts will consider the unique physiological environments and cellular constituents which facilitate tissue residency while preserving tissue function. Additionally, there will be descriptions of the various mechanisms responsible for the migration and segregation of tissue resident memory CD8 T cells from the peripheral T cell pool. Although the mechanisms facilitating the sequestration of tissue-resident memory T cells within a respective tissue has not well characterized, various theories will also be discussed. Lastly, how these T cells contribute to immunity to pathogens, cancer, and autoimmunity and could be modified through vaccination or therapeutic intervention will be described. As mucosal tissues are the major portals of pathogen entry and frequent transformation, the activities and persistence of tissue resident memory T cells is crucial for mediating protection at these sites.

The Origin of the Plasma Cell Heterogeneity

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889197347 Year: Pages: 80 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-734-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-04-07 11:22:02
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Plasma cells (PCs) are terminally differentiated B-cells producing large amounts of immunoglobulins (Ig). In humans, most of circulating Ig are produced by bone marrow plasma cells. PCs differentiate from activated naïve or memory B-cells usually activated by specific antigens. It is still controversial whether the regulation of PCs numbers and the “active” in vivo Ig diversity depend or not on non-specific reactivation of B-cells during infections. Depending on the stimulus (T-independent/T-dependent antigen, cytokines, partner cells) and B-cell types (naïve or memory, circulating or germinal center, lymph nodes or spleen, B1 or B2...), both the phenotype and isotype of PCs differ suggesting that PC diversity is either linked to B-cell diversity or to the type of stimulus or to both. Knowledge of the mechanisms supporting PC diversity has important consequences for the management of i) plasma cell neoplasia such as Multiple Myeloma and Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia, ii) vaccine protection against pathogens and iii) auto-immune diseases.

Keywords

Plasma cell --- B-cell --- differentiation --- Cell Cycle --- IL21 --- Autophagy --- B1 --- Autoimmunity --- Myeloma

iPS Cells for Modelling and Treatment of Human Diseases

ISBN: 9783038421221 9783038421214 Year: Pages: 422 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-05-09 15:30:07
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The field of reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) has moved very quickly, from bench to bedside in just eight years since its first discovery. The best example of this is the RIKEN clinical trial this year in Japan, which will use iPSC derived retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells to treat macular degeneration (MD). This is the first human disease to be tested for regeneration and repair by iPSC-derived cells and others will follow in the near future. Currently, there is an intense worldwide research effort to bring stem cell technology to the clinic for application to treat human diseases and pathologies. Human tissue diseases (including those of the lung, heart, brain, spinal cord, and muscles) drive organ bioengineering to the forefront of technology concerning cell replacement therapy. Given the critical mass of research and translational work being performed, iPSCs may very well be the cell type of choice for regenerative medicine in the future. Also, basic science questions, such as efficient differentiation protocols to the correct cell type for regenerating human tissues, the immune response of iPSC replacement therapy and genetic stability of iPSC-derived cells, are currently being investigated for future clinical applications.

Assessing Prenatal and Neonatal Gonadal Steroid Exposure for Studies of Human Development: Methodological and Theoretical Challenges

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889196074 Year: Pages: 80 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-607-4 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Internal medicine
Added to DOAB on : 2016-08-16 10:34:25
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There is extensive evidence from animal models that gonadal steroids, produced in fetal and neonatal life, act on the developing organism to produce sex differences far beyond the reproductive system. That early gonadal steroid exposure also plays an important role in human development is supported by studies of individuals with disorders of sex determination and differentiation. It is much less clear whether normal variation in gonadal steroid exposure predicts sexually dimorphic health outcomes or within-sex variation. This is largely due to challenges related to the assessment of gonadal steroid exposure in the developing fetus and neonate. Regarding the prenatal period, serial measurements of serum hormone levels in the fetus, for use in studies of later development, are not possible for ethical reasons. Researchers have measured hormones in maternal blood, umbilical cord blood, and amniotic fluid; used putative anthropometric indices such as the relative lengths of the 2nd and 4th digits (2D:4D); evaluated common variants in genes related to hormone production, transport, and metabolism; and examined development in opposite sex twins and the offspring of mothers with hyperandrogeny. Each of these approaches has particular strengths and notable weaknesses. Regarding the neonatal period, serial measurements in serum are often impractical for studies of typical development. Salivary hormone assays, frequently used in studies of older children and adults, have not been extensively investigated in neonates. The most appropriate timing for testing is also open to debate. Early work suggested that testosterone levels in males begin to rise after the first postnatal week, peak around the 3rd to 4th months of life, and then drop back to very low levels by 1 year. However a more recent study of 138 infants did not demonstrate this pattern. Testosterone was highest on the day of birth and gradually dropped over the first 6 months. Even less is known about patterns of early estrogen exposure, though highly sensitive bioassays indicated that sex differences are present in early childhood. In addition, the design and interpretation of studies may be impacted by widespread acceptance of conceptual frameworks that are not well-supported empirically. For example, many researchers presume that the free hormone hypothesis, which states that unbound hormone is more readily diffusible into tissues and thus a better measure of actual exposure, is true. However this hypothesis has been challenged on multiple grounds. A second example: it is generally accepted that masculinization of the human brain is primarily mediated by the androgen receptor (in contrast to rodents where the estrogen receptor plays a major role), in part because chromosomal males with complete androgen insensitivity generally espouse a female gender identity. However this is not always the case, and other sexually dimorphic outcomes have not been carefully assessed in CAIS. The aim of this research topic is to gather together experimental and review papers which address the diverse challenges in assessing prenatal and neonatal gonadal steroid exposure for studies of human development with the expectation that this will allow more critical appraisal of existing studies, identify critical research gaps, and improve the design of future studies.

Immune System Modeling and Analysis

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889195015 Year: Pages: 401 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-501-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-03 13:02:24
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The rapid development of new methods for immunological data collection - from multicolor flow cytometry, through single-cell imaging, to deep sequencing - presents us now, for the first time, with the ability to analyze and compare large amounts of immunological data in health, aging and disease. The exponential growth of these datasets, however, challenges the theoretical immunology community to develop methods for data organization and analysis. Furthermore, the need to test hypotheses regarding immune function, and generate predictions regarding the outcomes of medical interventions, necessitates the development of mathematical and computational models covering processes on multiple scales, from the genetic and molecular to the cellular and system scales. The last few decades have seen the development of methods for presentation and analysis of clonal repertoires (those of T and B lymphocytes) and phenotypic (surface-marker based) repertoires of all lymphocyte types, and for modeling the intricate network of molecular and cellular interactions within the immune systems. This e-Book, which has first appeared as a ‘Frontiers in Immunology’ research topic, provides a comprehensive, online, open access snapshot of the current state of the art on immune system modeling and analysis.

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