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Target Suitability and the Crime Drop

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ISBN: 9781137525024 9781349707058 9781137525017 9781349995905 Year: Pages: 22 DOI: 10.1007/978-1-137-52502-4 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature
Subject: Social Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2020-02-05 11:21:04
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This is a chapter from The Criminal Act: The Role and Influence of Routine Activity Theory edited by Martin A. Andresen and Graham Farrell. This chapter is available open access under a CC BY license. Target suitability is a cornerstone of Marcus Felson's routine activities approach, and critical in determining crime rates. Recent research identifies reduced target suitability, via improved security, as central to the 'crime drop' experienced in many countries. Studies in different countries show car theft fell with far more and better vehicle security. Yet increases in household security were more modest and do not track burglary's decrease as well. In this chapter, the authors explain that apparent anomaly as due more to an improvement in the quality of household security leading to reduced burglary. It is further suggested that improvements to home insulation in the UK that brought double glazing may have, somewhat inadvertently, introduced better frames and locks for doors and windows, that in turn reduced household burglary.; This is a chapter from The Criminal Act: The Role and Influence of Routine Activity Theory edited by Martin A. Andresen and Graham Farrell. This chapter is available open access under a CC BY license. Target suitability is a cornerstone of Marcus Felson's routine activities approach, and critical in determining crime rates. Recent research identifies reduced target suitability, via improved security, as central to the 'crime drop' experienced in many countries. Studies in different countries show car theft fell with far more and better vehicle security. Yet increases in household security were more modest and do not track burglary's decrease as well. In this chapter, the authors explain that apparent anomaly as due more to an improvement in the quality of household security leading to reduced burglary. It is further suggested that improvements to home insulation in the UK that brought double glazing may have, somewhat inadvertently, introduced better frames and locks for doors and windows, that in turn reduced household burglary.

Keywords

Criminology --- Public safety

Chapter 5: 'Target Suitability and the Crime Drop' from book: The Criminal Act: The Role and Influence of Routine Activity Theory

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ISBN: 9781137391322 Year: Pages: 17 DOI: 10.1057/9781137391322_5 Language: English
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
Subject: Social and Public Welfare
Added to DOAB on : 2016-04-21 17:12:36
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This chapter is open access under a CC BY license. It is from The Criminal Act: The Role and Influence of Routine Activity Theory, edited by Martin A. Andresen and Graham Farrell. The full volume provides a unique collection of essays in honour of the work of Marcus Felson and his notable contribution to routine activity theory, environmental criminology and the discipline more broadly.

Chapter 9: 'Crowd Spatial Patterns at Bus Stops: Security Implications and Effects of Warning Messages' from book: Safety and Security in Transit Environments: An Interdisciplinary Approach

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ISBN: 9781137556363 Year: Pages: 23 DOI: 10.1057/9781137457653_9 Language: English
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
Subject: Social and Public Welfare
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-18 11:42:04
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This is a chapter from Safety and Security in Transit Environments: An Interdisciplinary Approach edited by Vania Ceccato and Andrew Newton. This chapter is available open access under a CC BY license. As other chapters in Safety and Security in Transit Environments assert, crimes such as pickpocketing can concentrate near bus stops, and crowding and congestion is a factor that heightens this risk. But to target interventions effectively, it is useful to determine what local-level interactions characterise this crowding behaviour. This paper aims to provide a first step to using data collected from laboratory experiments to address questions from crime and transport research. The experiment considered differences in interpersonal distances to further analyse crowding behaviour to attain further insight that could narrow the focus of possible interventions. Audio warnings are examined as a possible solution, and findings show that crowding peaks when passengers board the bus, and audio messages may be one approach for addressing this. To conclude, implications of identifying boarding as a problem area, and the effectiveness of warning messages as a situational crime prevention tool are discussed.

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