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HSPs - Ambiguous Mediators of Immunity

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889451524 Year: Pages: 92 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-152-4 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-08-28 14:01:09
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Heat shock proteins (HSPs) were discovered as polypeptides induced by stress that can be found in all kingdoms of cellular organisms. Their functions were, a first enigmatic and these proteins were thus classified by molecular weight, as in—Hsp27, Hsp70, Hsp90, Hsp110. More recently, each of these size-classified molecules has attributed a role in protein folding, and they thus came to be known, as a class, as molecular chaperones. However, the they possess properties beyond chaperoning. Indeed, their discovery in the extracellular spaces suggested roles in regulation of the immune responses.

Behcet's Disease

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ISBN: 9789535132257 9789535132264 Year: Pages: 220 DOI: 10.5772/65884 Language: English
Publisher: IntechOpen
Subject: Microbiology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-10-03 07:51:50

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Behcet's disease is a multisystem inflammatory disease with unknown etiology and has a unique geographic distribution. It is characterized by recurrent oral aphthous lesions, recurrent uveitis, skin lesions, and genital ulcerations. However, it may involve the eye, joints, and cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and neurological systems at varying degrees as well as the skin and mucous membranes. The disease may manifest itself in a wide spectrum of symptoms ranging from mild symptoms to life-threatening symptoms or severe symptoms that may create permanent sequelae. Knowing the nature of the disease will make it easier to diagnose and manage the disease. This book was written by expert authors, and detailed epidemiology, etiopathogenesis, mucocutaneous findings, and systemic involvement of Behcet's disease are presented to readers.

Autoimmuno-Anti-Tumour Immunity (AATI) - Understanding the Immune Responses against "Self" & "Altered-self"

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889451906 Year: Pages: 174 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-190-6 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-10-13 14:57:01
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The brief description of tumours being “wounds that do not heal” by Dr Harold F. Dworak nearly three decades ago (N Engl J Med 1986) has provided not only a vivid illustration of neoplastic diseases in general but also, in retrospect conceptually, a plausible immunological definition of cancers. Based on our current understanding in the field, it could have even a multi-dimensional meaning attached with. This relates to several important issues which need to be addressed further, i.e. in terms of a close link between chronic inflammation and tumourigenesis widely observed; clinical and experimental evidence of immunity against tumours versus the highly immunosuppressive tumour microenvironment being associated; and their underlying immunological mechanisms, oncogenic basis, as well as the true causal relationship in question. Recent findings from studies into the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and, more importantly, the mechanisms which protect against it, have offered some new insights for our understanding in this direction. Chronic or persistent autoimmune-like inflammatory conditions are evidently associated with tumor development. The important question is about their true causal relationship. Chronic or persistent inflammation has been shown to contribute directly to tumour development by triggering neoplastic transformation and production of inflammatory mediators which could promote cancer cell survival, proliferation and invasion. On the other hand, tumours are mutated self-tissue cells to which the host immune system is largely tolerized otherwise. Although the mutations may give rise to the expression of tumour-specific antigens (TSA) or tumour-associated antigens (TAA), most of these TSAs/TAAs are found to be poor immunogens. The ongoing inflammatory conditions may therefore reflect a desperate attempt of the host immune system to mount anti-tumour responses, though ineffectively, being a consequence of the continuous yet largely futile triggering by those poorly immunogenic TSAs/TAAs. Furthermore, during autoimmune or overtly persistent immunological responses, many regulatory mechanisms are triggered in the host in attempts to limit the ongoing harmful inflammatory reactions. Such a negative feedback regulation is known to be crucial in preventing normal individuals from immune-mediated diseases. As a result of the negative feedback loop, however, an excessive production of anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive molecules followed by the exhaustion of the immune effector cells may instead lower the ability of the host immune system to mount specific anti-tumor responses, allowing the escape of tumour or mutated cells from immunosurveillance. This may also help to explain why the most effective way to enhance host immunity against cancer is by targeting the negative arm of immune regulation. In this Frontiers Research Topic, we aim to gather current views from experts in these inherent overlapping fields of oncology, autoimmunity and tumour immunology, and to make them available to our potential readership who may be particularly interested in this cutting-edge area. By understanding how the immune system is normally regulated, why dysregulation of which may cause the immunological-oncological related diseases, we also encourage further discussions as to how the so-called "self-reactivity" (autoimmune responses) can be alternatively switched on and redirected, immunologically or molecularly, for effective cancer treatment.

Oncolytic Viruses - Genetically Engineering the Future of Cancer Therapy

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889453580 Year: Pages: 193 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-358-0 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Oncology --- Allergy and Immunology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-02-27 16:16:45
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The ability to genetically engineer oncolytic viruses in order to minimize side effects and improve the selective targeting of tumor cells has opened up novel opportunities for treating cancer. Understanding the mechanisms involved and the complex interaction between the viruses and the immune system will undoubtedly help guide the development of new strategies. Theranostic biomarkers to monitor these therapies in clinical trials serve an important need in this innovative field and demand further research.

Signal Transduction in Stomatal Guard Cells

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889451678 Year: Pages: 105 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-167-8 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Botany --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-08-28 14:01:09
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Stomata, the tiny pores on leaf surface, are the gateways for CO2 uptake during photosynthesis as well as water loss in transpiration. Further, plants use stomatal closure as a defensive response, often triggered by elicitors, to prevent the entry of pathogens. The guard cells are popular model systems to study the signalling mechanism in plant cells. The messengers that mediate closure upon perception of elicitors or microbe associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) are quite similar to those during ABA effects. These components include reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), cytosolic pH and intracellular Ca2+. The main components are ROS, NO and cytosolic free Ca2+. The list extends to others, such as G-proteins, protein phosphatases, protein kinases, phospholipids and ion channels. The sequence of these signalling components and their interaction during stomatal signalling are complex and quite interesting. The present e-Book provides a set of authoritative articles from ‘Special Research Topic’ on selected areas of stomatal guard cells. In the first set of two articles, an overview of ABA and MAMPs as signals is presented. The next set of 4 articles, emphasize the role of ROS, NO, Ca2+ as well as pH, as secondary messengers. The next group of 3 articles highlight the recent advances on post-translational modification of guard cell proteins, with emphasis on 14-3-3 proteins and MAPK cascades. The last article described the method to isolate epidermis of grass species and monitor stomatal responses to different signals. Our e-Book is a valuable and excellent source of information for all those interested in guard cell function as well as signal transduction in plant cells.

Tertiary Lymphoid Organs (TLOs): Powerhouses of Disease Immunity

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889451807 Year: Pages: 235 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-180-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-08-28 14:01:09
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The immune system employs TLOs to elicit highly localized and forceful responses to unresolvable peripheral tissue inflammation. Current data indicate that TLOs are protective but they may also lead to collateral tissue injury and serve as nesting places to generate autoreactive lymphocytes. A better comprehension of these powerhouses of disease immunity will likely facilitate development to unprecedented and specific therapies to fight chronic inflammatory diseases.

Plant immunity against viruses

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889452699 Year: Pages: 163 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-269-9 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Microbiology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-02-27 16:16:44
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Plant viruses impose a serious threat on agriculture, which motivates extensive breeding efforts for viral resistant crops and inspires lasting interests on basic research to understand the mechanisms underlying plant immunity against viruses. Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites. Their genomes are usually small and only encode a few products that are essential to hijack host machinery for their nucleotide and protein biosynthesis, and that are necessary to suppress host immunity. Plants evolved multilayers of defense mechanisms to defeat viral infection. In this research topic, we gathered 13 papers covering recent advances in different aspects of plant immunity against viruses, including reviews on RNA silencing and R gene based immunity and their application, translational initiation factor mediated recessive resistance, genome editing based viral immunity, role of chloroplast in plant-virus interaction, and research articles providing new mechanistic insights on plant-virus interactions. We hope that this Research Topic helps readers to have a better understanding of the progresses that have been made recently in plant immunity against viruses. A deeper understanding of plant antiviral immunity will facilitate the development of innovative approaches for crop protections and improvements.

Antibody Repertoire and Graft Outcome Following Solid Organ Transplantation

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889452415 Year: Pages: 176 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-241-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-10-13 14:57:01
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The first real major breakthrough that laid the basis of HLA antibody detection in the field of solid organ transplantation, came with the introduction of the complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) test in 1964 by Terasaki and McClelland. Since then, methods for antibody detection have evolved remarkably from conventional cell-based assays to the current advanced solid phase systems on the Luminex platform, with increasing degree of sensitivity and specificity. The latter have been indispensable for more accurate identification of donor specific HLA antibodies in broadly reactive allo antisera, and to guide donor selection and kidney paired exchange programs through virtual crossmatching, in addition to serving as excellent tools for initiating pre-transplant desensitization and post- transplant antibody monitoring. Consensus is evolving on the optimal routine employment of these methods in donor selection strategies along with an understanding of the clinical relevance of antibodies detected by each of them. The immunoassays based on the Luminex platform and flow cytometric beads are however unable to discriminate complement fixing from non-complement fixing HLA antibodies. This is important because the former are considered clinically more pertinent in the peri-transplant period. The C1q assay which is a modification of the solid phase assay based on Luminex single antigen beads, which can be used effectively to monitor high dose IVIG desensitization is essentially a surrogate complement fixing assay, retaining the exquisite sensitivity and specificity of the Luminex platform. Currently, information obtained from these assays is preliminary and much needs to be done to standardize technologies and set a consensus ‘MFI cut off’ for antibody positivity. Besides the overriding influence of anti-HLA antibodies on overall solid organ graft survival, immune response to non-HLA antigens has become a topic of substantial interest in recent years. An ever expanding list of non-HLA antigens has been implicated in graft rejection for various organs, of which the most noted are the Major Histocompatibility Complex class I chain-related molecule A (MICA), Vimentin, Myosin, Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), Tubulin and Collagen. MICA is one of the most polymorphic and extensively studied non-HLA antigenic targets especially in renal transplantation. Although there are clear indications of MICA antibodies being associated with adverse graft outcome, to date a definitive consensus on this relationship has not been agreed. Because MICA molecules are not expressed constitutively on immunocompetent cells such as T and B lymphocytes, it is of utmost importance to address the impact of MICA donor specific antibodies (DSA) as compared to those that are non- donor specific (NDSA) on graft outcome. The soluble isoform of MICA molecule (sMICA) that is derived from the proteolytic shedding of membrane bound molecules has the potential to engage the NK-cell activating receptor NKG2D and down-regulate its expression. Consequent to the interaction of NKG2D by sMICA, the receptor ligand complex is endocytosed and degraded and thus suppresses NKG2D mediated lysis of the target by NK cells. Thus interaction between NKG2D and sMICA leads to expansion of immunosuppressive/anergic T cells thereby resulting in suppression of NKG2D mediated host innate immunity. These concept support the possible involvement of an immunosuppressive role for sMICA during allotransplantation as shown recently for heart transplantation. This research topic focuses on the clinical utility of investigating the complete antibody repertoire in solid organ transplantation.

Recent Progress in Bunyavirus Research

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ISBN: 9783038423935 9783038423928 Year: Pages: VIII, 224 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2017-06-14 11:52:43
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The Bunyaviridae is the largest family of RNA viruses, with over 350 isolates worldwide distributed into five genera (i.e., Hantavirus, Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Tospovirus, and Phlebovirus). Many of these viruses are significant human or agricultural pathogens. The increasing number of reports on new emerging bunyaviruses and infection episodes makes it essential that we obtain a comprehensive understanding of bunyaviruses and their infection mechanisms. Although all bunyaviruses possesses a tripartite, negative-sense (or ambi-sense) RNA genome, they exhibit substantial differences in their structure, genome organization and replication strategies, which make functional interpolation across genus boundaries difficult.Fortunately, the bunyavirus field has witnessed many exciting new findings and breakthroughs in recent years. These discoveries span a wide spectrum of research areas, including structural characterization of viruses and viral proteins, the identification of new viruses, investigations into host switch and vectors of transmission, genome-based analysis of virus evolution and phylogenetic lineages, the development of new research tools, such as replicons and reverse genetics, molecular characterization of the virus life cycle at the cell level (i.e., cell entry, replication, transcription, translation, genome packaging, reassortment, and virus assembly, etc.), studies of virus–host interactions and host antiviral defense, the development of vaccines/drugs and the use of bunyaviruses for novel applications.This book includes both research and review papers that together provide a glimpse into the latest research on bunyaviruses and, at the same time, highlight some of the important research achievements made in recent years. Study topics of both a fundamental and applied nature are collated. An informed perspective for future research directions is provided and can stimulate research in some of the understudied areas.

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