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Yeats's Legacies: Yeats Annual No. 21

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Book Series: Yeats Annual ISSN: 0278-7687/2054-3611 ISBN: 9781783744541 9781783744565 Year: Volume: 1 Pages: 684 DOI: https://doi.org/10.11647/OBP.0135 Language: English
Publisher: Open Book Publishers
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2018-03-15 13:13:29
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The two great Yeats Family Sales of 2017 and the legacy of the Yeats family’s 80-year tradition of generosity to Ireland’s great cultural institutions provide the kaleidoscope through which these advanced research essays find their theme. Hannah Sullivan’s brilliant history of Yeats’s versecraft challenges Poundian definitions of Modernism; Denis Donoghue offers unique family memories of 1916 whilst tracing the political significance of the Easter Rising; Anita Feldman addresses Yeats’s responses to the Rising’s appropriation of his symbols and myths, the daring artistry of his ritual drama developed from Noh, his poetry of personal utterance, and his vision of art as a body reborn rather than a treasure preserved amid the testing of the illusions that hold civilizations together in ensuing wars. Warwick Gould looks at Yeats as founding Senator in the new Free State, and his valiant struggle against the literary censorship law of 1929 (with its present-day legacy of Irish anti-blasphemy law still presenting a constitutional challenge). Drawing on Gregory Estate documents, James Pethica looks at the evictions which preceded Yeats’s purchase of Thoor Ballylee in Galway; Lauren Arrington looks back at Yeats, Ezra Pound, and the Ghosts of The Winding Stair (1929) in Rapallo. Having co-edited both versions of A Vision, Catherine Paul offers some profound reflections on ‘Yeats and Belief’. Grevel Lindop provides a pioneering view of Yeats’s impact on English mystical verse and on Charles Williams who, while at Oxford University Press, helped publish the Oxford Book of Modern Verse. Stanley van der Ziel looks at the presence of Shakespeare in Yeats’s Purgatory. William H. O’Donnell examines the vexed textual legacy of his late work, On the Boiler while Gould considers the challenge Yeats’s intentionalism posed for once-fashionable post-structuralist editorial theory. John Kelly recovers a startling autobiographical short story by Maud Gonne. While nine works of current biographical, textual and literary scholarship are reviewed, Maud Gonne is the focus of debate for two reviewers, as are Eva Gore-Booth, Constance and Casimir Markievicz, Rudyard Kipling, David Jones, T. S. Eliot and his presence on the radio.

Tales of Darkness and Light: Soso Tham's The Old Days of the Khasis

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Book Series: World Oral Literature Series ISSN: 2050-7933/2054-362X ISBN: 9781783744688 9781783744701 Year: Volume: 1 Pages: 100 DOI: https://doi.org/10.11647/OBP.0137 Language: English
Publisher: Open Book Publishers
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2018-04-24 18:00:12
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Soso Tham (1873–1940), the acknowledged poet laureate of the Khasis of northeastern India, was one of the first writers to give written poetic form to the rich oral tradition of his people.Poet of landscape, myth and memory, Soso Tham paid rich and poignant tribute to his tribe in his masterpiece The Old Days of the Khasis. Janet Hujon’s vibrant new translation presents the English reader with Tham’s long poem, which keeps a rich cultural tradition of the Khasi people alive through its retelling of old narratives and acts as a cultural signpost for their literary identity.This book is essential reading for anyone with an interest in Indian literature and culture and in the interplay between oral traditions and written literary forms.This edition includes:• English translation• Critical apparatus• Embedded audio recordings of the original text

The Life and Letters of William Sharp and "Fiona Macleod". Volume 1: 1855-1894

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ISBN: 9781783745005 9781783745029 Year: Pages: 710 DOI: https://doi.org/10.11647/OBP.0142 Language: English
Publisher: Open Book Publishers
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-12-04 13:00:52
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"William Sharp (1855-1905) conducted one of the most audacious literary deceptions of his or any time. Sharp was a Scottish poet, novelist, biographer and editor who in 1893 began to write critically and commercially successful books under the name Fiona Macleod. This was far more than just a pseudonym: he corresponded as Macleod, enlisting his sister to provide the handwriting and address, and for more than a decade ""Fiona Macleod"" duped not only the general public but such literary luminaries as William Butler Yeats and, in America, E. C. Stedman.Sharp wrote ""I feel another self within me now more than ever; it is as if I were possessed by a spirit who must speak out"". This three-volume collection brings together Sharp’s own correspondence – a fascinating trove in its own right, by a Victorian man of letters who was on intimate terms with writers including Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Walter Pater, and George Meredith – and the Fiona Macleod letters, which bring to life Sharp’s intriguing ""second self"". With an introduction and detailed notes by William F. Halloran, this richly rewarding collection offers a wonderful insight into the literary landscape of the time, while also investigating a strange and underappreciated phenomenon of late-nineteenth-century English literature. It is essential for scholars of the period, and it is an illuminating read for anyone interested in authorship and identity. "

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