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Happiness and Utility

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9781787350489 Year: Pages: 332 DOI: 10.14324/111.9781787350489 Language: English
Publisher: UCL Press
Subject: Law --- Political Science --- Philosophy
Added to DOAB on : 2019-08-01 11:21:02
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Happiness and Utility brings together experts on utilitarianism to explore the concept of happiness within the utilitarian tradition, situating it in earlier eighteenth-century thinkers and working through some of its developments at the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth centuries. Drawing on a range of philosophical and historical approaches to the study of the central idea of utilitarianism, the chapters provide a rich set of insights into a founding component of ethics and modern political and economic thought, as well as political and economic practice. In doing so, the chapters examine the multiple dimensions of utilitarianism and the contested interpretations of this standard for judgement in morality and public policy.

Keywords

philosophy --- Bentham --- utilitarianism --- ethics --- law

Echoes of No Thing: Thinking between Heidegger and Dōgen

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ISBN: 9781950192014 97819501920201 Year: Pages: 210 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0239.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Philosophy
Added to DOAB on : 2019-03-26 11:21:03
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Echoes of No Thing seeks to understand the space between thinking which Martin Heidegger and the 13th-century Zen patriarch Eihei Dōgen explore in their writing and teachings. Heidegger most clearly attempts this in Contributions to Philosophy (of the Event) and Dōgen in his Shōbōgenzō, a collection of fascicles which he compiled in his lifetime. Both thinkers draw us towards thinking, instead of merely defining systems of thought. Both Heidegger and Dōgen imagine possibilities not apparent in the world we currently inhabit, but notably, find possible, through a refashioning of thinking as a soteriological reimagining that clears space for the presencing of an authentic experience in the space which emerges between certainties. Jenkins elucidates this soteriological reimagining through a close reading of both authors’ conceptions of time and space, and by developing a practice of listening that is attuned to the echoes that resonate between the two thinkers. While Heidegger often wrote about new beginnings (as well as about gathering oneself, preparing the site, clearings, and practicing) in preparation for the evental un-concealing of truth, nowhere is this as present as in the enigmatic, difficult, and in fact beautiful, Contributions. To call a text beautiful, especially a work of philosophy, risks committing an act of disingenuity, and yet Contributions, like Jacques Derrida’s Glas or Walter Benjamin’s unfinished Arcades Project, rises to this acclaim through its very resistance to a system, its refusal to be easily digested, or even understood. Contributions is unfinished, partial, even at times muttered; it is the beginning of a thinking which takes place on a path and as such cannot imagine—or refuse—its final destination. It invites us to take up towards, but not to insist on, its thinking; it is a “turn” away from the reason and logic of a technologized world and returns philosophy—as a thinking—to a place of wonder and awe. Dōgen’s Shōbogenzō, from another culture and time entirely, is also a beautiful text, for similar reasons. The Shōbogenzō, gathered first as a series of talks given by Eihei Dōgen (and later composed as written texts) details the process of understanding which leads, for Dōgen, to a position of pure seeing, or satori, and yet these talks are not simply rules for monks, nor merely imprecations and demands for a laity; rather, they open a being’s thinking to the possibility of something purely other and work as a transition across worlds that also opens us to an other world. What both thinkers illustrate, as do the other thinkers drawn on in this project—most notably, those philosophers associated with the Kyoto School, who were both intimately aware of Dōgen’s work, and studied, or studied with, Heidegger—is that world is not a fixed, stable entity; rather it is a fugal composition of possibility, of as yet untraversed—and at times un-traversable—spaces. Echoes of No Thing seeks to examine, within the lacunal eddies of be-coming’s arrival, that space between which both thinkers point towards as possible sites of new beginnings.

Non-Conceptual Negativity: Damaged Reflections on Turkey

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9781950192038 9781950192045 Year: Pages: 142 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0247.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-04-12 11:21:02
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Non-Conceptual Negativity: Damaged Reflections on Turkey critiques those who have accused Deleuze of an unbounded affirmation which, according to them, has played directly into the hands of capitalist modes of production. Yet no one has acknowledged that under the aegis of nano-fascism, late capitalism has grown into Neanderthal capitalism, invented and developed in laboratory countries like Turkey with the aid of an international Neanderthal league. Layer upon layer, Aracagök explains in fragmentary fashion that it is not only a matter of how Turkey has grown into a prime laboratory of nano-fascism with the aid of the US and the European Union, but also how the results obtained from this laboratory are put into practice in different countries under Neanderthal capitalism, enslaving each and every one of us into accepting even the position of suicide bomber. As none of us is exempted from nano-fascism today, perhaps it is timely to reconsider the ways in which Deleuzian thought is appropriated in the form of an unquestioned affirmation of everything and how its critique has ended up in an old-fashioned formulation of the in-dividual according to a party program. If this all goes to show that we are face to face with a route different from the accepted forms of affirmation — that is, if we are all affirmed and seem to be happily affirming life as it is as a result of the Neanderthal manipulation of the negative — then isn’t it timely to rethink the Deleuzian affirmation in its non-originary origin with regard to Adorno’s resistance against affirmation? That is, the double negation never ends up in affirmation, and if it does so, it might mean your negation is not strong enough.

Internationale Gerechtigkeit und institutionelle Verantwortung

Authors: --- ---
ISBN: 9783110615876 Year: Pages: 438,00 DOI: 10.1515/9783110615876 Language: German / English
Publisher: De Gruyter
Subject: Philosophy
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-27 13:08:38
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What are the implications of globalization for moral behavior? What would global practices look like that were just for all in principle? Is it possible to generalize the basic principles of social justice as they prevail in democratic countries? Or instead, do other, possibly weaker levels of moral responsibility exist at the global level that promote global social justice based on different sets of principles?

The Pedagogics of Liberation

Authors: --- ---
ISBN: 9781950192274 9781950192281 Year: Pages: 204 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0257.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Education --- History --- Migration --- Economics
Added to DOAB on : 2019-08-20 11:21:02
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"Enrique Dussel is considered one of the founding philosophers of liberation in the Latin American tradition, an influential arm of what is now called decoloniality. While he is astoundingly prolific, relatively few of his works can be found in English translation — and none of these focus specifically on education. Founding members of the Latin American Philosophy of Education Society David I. Backer and Cecilia Diego bring to us Dussel’s The Pedagogics of Liberation: A Latin American Philosophy of Education, the first English translation of Dussel’s thinking on education, and also the first translation of any part of his landmark multi-volume work Towards an Ethics of Latin American Liberation.&#xD;&#xD;Dussel’s ouevre is an impressive intellectual mosaic that uses Europeans to disrupt European thinking. This mosaic has at its center French philosopher Emmanuel Levinas, but also includes Ancient Greek philosophy, Thomist theology, modern Enlightenment philosophy, analytic philosophy of language, Marxism, psychoanalysis (Freud, Klein, evolutionary psychology, neuroscience), phenomenology (Sartre, Heidegger, Husserl, Hegel), critical theory (Frankfurt School, Habermas), and linguistics. Dussel joins these traditions to Latin American history, literature, and philosophy, specifically the work of Octavio Paz, Ivan Illich, and the philosophers of liberation whom Dussel studied with in Argentina before his exile to Mexico in the late 1970s.&#xD;&#xD;Drawing heavily from the ethics of Levinas, Dussel examines the dominating and liberating features of intimate, concrete, and observable interactions between different kinds of people who might sit down and have face-to-face encounters, specifically where there may be an inequality of knowledge and a responsibility to guide, teach, learn, care, or study: teacher–student, politician–citizen, doctor–patient, philosopher–nonphilosopher, and so on. Those occupying the superior position of these face-to-face encounters (teachers, politicians, doctors, philosophers) have a clear choice for Dussel when it comes to their pedagogics. They are either open to hearing the voice of the Other, disrupting their sense of what is and should be by a newness beyond what they know; or, following the dominant pedagogics, they can try to communicate and instruct their sense of what is and should be (which Dussel, in a Latin American context, associates with dominant cultures) to the (supposed) tabula rasas in their charge. Dussel calls that sense of what is and should be “lo Mismo.” [The French in Levinas is “le Même,” and Backer and Diego have translated Dussel’s “lo Mismo” as “the Same.”]&#xD;&#xD;This groundbreaking translation makes possible a face-to-face encounter between an Anglo Philosophy of Education and Latin American Pedagogics. “Pedagogics” should be considered as a type of philosophical inquiry alongside ethics, economics, and politics. Dussel’s pedagogics is a decolonizing pedagogics, one rooted in the philosophy of liberation he has spent his epic career articulating. With an Introduction by renowned philosopher Linda Martin Alcoff, this book adds an essential voice to our conversations about teaching, learning, and studying, as well as critical theory in general."&#xD;

Misinterest

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ISBN: 9781950192298 9781950192304 Year: Pages: 166 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0256.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Psychology --- Social Sciences --- Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-07-03 11:21:05
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"The term “interest” lacks a precise antonym. In English, we have “disinterested” and “uninteresting,” but we want for a term that denotes robust opposition to interest. The same appears to hold true in every other language (as far as we know). Interest’s missing antonym reflects not merely a widespread lexical oversight, but a misrecognition of interest’s complete and exact meaning. More importantly, the idea that interest has no opposite expresses a certain refusal to acknowledge the power of the impulse to extinguish interest, for the self and for others.&#xD;&#xD;Why then do we foreclose interest’s possibility, degrade our (and others’) capacities to experience interest, and destroy interest’s objects? Why do we decline what interest proffers — which includes creative and subjective being, thinking, and relating — in favor of more primitive modes of survival, thoughtlessness, and nonbeing? Why do relationships — with ourselves, with others, with objects — toward which genuine interest draws us seem sometimes, if not often, unbearable?&#xD;&#xD;These questions are difficult. Their answers, even more so. Misinterest: Essays, Pensées, and Dreams attempts to approach them in an honest way, without making them fascinating, mysterious, boring, obscurantist, or fascinatingly mysteriously boringly obscurantist. Outwardly, Misinterest is concerned with dreams and forgetting and Eros and soaring dogs and groups and suicidal suburban teenagers and sex and jury duty and Nazis and fathers and hatred and holy parrots and fundamentalists and plagues and other things that may or may not be interesting. Ultimately, however, it seeks, like Jules Renard, “en restant exact” (in remaining true/real), to shed light on the establishment of misinterest, missingness, and mystery where and when they need not be, and, thus, on the psychic, familial, and political forces that compel us not to be when and where we ought."&#xD;

The Origins of Self

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ISBN: 9781787356306 Year: Pages: 248 DOI: 10.14324/111.9781787356306 Language: English
Publisher: UCL Press
Subject: Biology --- Psychology --- Sociology --- Linguistics
Added to DOAB on : 2019-08-01 11:21:02
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The Origins of Self explores the role that selfhood plays in defining human society, and each human individual in that society. It considers the genetic and cultural origins of self, the role that self plays in socialisation and language, and the types of self we generate in our individual journeys to and through adulthood.&#xD;&#xD;Edwardes argues that other awareness is a relatively early evolutionary development, present throughout the primate clade and perhaps beyond, but self-awareness is a product of the sharing of social models, something only humans appear to do. The self of which we are aware is not something innate within us, it is a model of our self produced as a response to the models of us offered to us by other people. Edwardes proposes that human construction of selfhood involves seven different types of self. All but one of them are internally generated models, and the only non-model, the actual self, is completely hidden from conscious awareness. We rely on others to tell us about our self, and even to let us know we are a self.&#xD;

Vital Reenchantments: Biophilia, Gaia, Cosmos, and the Affectively Ecological

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ISBN: 9781950192076 9781950192083 Year: Pages: 276 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0240.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-03-26 11:21:03
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Not all charms fly at the touch of cold philosophy. Vital Reenchantments examines so-called cold philosophy, or science, that does precisely the opposite — rather than mercilessly emptying out and unweaving, it operates as a philosophy that animates. More specifically, Greyson closely examines how a specific group of “poet-in-scientists” of the late 1970s and 1980s directed attention to the “wondrous” unfolding of life, at a time when the counter-culture in particular had made the institution of science synonymous with technologies of alienation and destruction. In this vein, Vital Reenchantments takes up E.O. Wilson’s Biophilia (1984), James Lovelock’s Gaia (1979), and Carl Sagan’s Cosmos (1980), in order to show how each work fleshes out scientific concepts with a unique attention to “affective wonder,” understood as the experience of and attunement to novel effects. What is so unique about these works is that they reenchant the scientific world without pandering to what Richard Dawkins will later term “cosmic sentimentality.” Carl Sagan may have said “We are made of starstuff,” but he would never insist, as Joni Mitchell did in 1969, that “we’ve got to get ourselves back to the garden.” Instead, they insist on a third way that does not rely on the idea of an ecological Eden — a vigorously vital materialism in which the affective trumps the sentimental. Further, the historical emergence of these works, all published within 5 years of each other, was no accident: each book responded to an ever deepening sense of environmental crisis, certainly, but along with it they responded to, perhaps more than marginally related, narratives of the large-scale disenchantment brought on by modernity or science, and more often than not a mixture of the two. Greyson argues that the persistence of these works and their affectively-charged scientific concepts in contemporary popular culture and ecological thought is no accident. As such, these works deserve recognition as far more than “popular science” and can be seen as essential contributions to more contemporary vital materialist thought and ecological theory. No doubt this talk of enchantment and wonder, so tied to immediate experience, can seem trivial in the face of any number of environmental crises (global warming first among these) that do not just appear ominously on the horizon, but loom as never before. The first task of this book thus to pose the same question that Jane Bennett does at the end of her own work on enchantment: “How can someone write a book about enchantment in such a world?” Does this approach really provide, as Latour phrases it, “a way to bridge the distance between the scale of the phenomena we hear about and the tiny Umwelt inside which we witness, as if it were a fish inside its bowl, an ocean of catastrophes that are supposed to unfold”? Ultimately, Vital Reenchantments argues that affective ecologies, properly attended to, point toward an open present, one that broadens the horizons of the “fish bowl” and allows us to imagine engendering futures that are neither naively hopeful nor hopelessly apocalyptic.

Museum of Nonhumanity

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9781950192113 9781950192120 Year: Pages: 281 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0252.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Arts in general
Added to DOAB on : 2019-05-24 11:21:12
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Museum of Nonhumanity is the catalogue for a full-size touring museum that presents the history of the distinction between humans and animals, and the way that this artificial boundary has been used to oppress human and nonhuman beings over long historical periods. Throughout history, declaring a group to be nonhuman or subhuman has been an effective tool for justifying slavery, oppression, medical experimentation, genocide, and other forms of violence against those deemed “other.” Conversely, differentiating humans from other species has paved the way for the abuse of natural resources and other animals. Museum of Nonhumanity approaches animalization as a nexus that connects xenophobia, sexism, racism, transphobia, and the abuse of nature and other animals. The touring museum hosts lecture programs in which local civil rights and animal rights organizations, academics, artists, and activists propose paths to a more inclusive society through intersectional approaches. The museum also hosts a pop-up book shop and a vegan café. As a temporary, utopian institution, Museum of Nonhumanity stands as a monument to the call to make animalization history.&#xD;

Die Säkularisierung des Exodus

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Book Series: Edition Moderne Postmoderne ISBN: 9783839443743 9783837643749 Year: Pages: 236 DOI: 10.14361/9783839443743 Language: German
Publisher: transcript Verlag
Subject: Social Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2019-07-03 11:21:09
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The cultural philosophical analysis of the secularization of the exodus contrasts despotic and emancipatory aspects of psychoanalytic, literary and political adaptations of the biblical myth.&#xD;

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