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Why Knowing What To Do Is Not Enough

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Book Series: Research for Policy ISBN: 9789402417258 Year: Pages: 157 DOI: 10.1007/978-94-024-1725-8 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature
Subject: Social and Public Welfare --- Psychology --- Political Science --- Zoology
Added to DOAB on : 2020-02-05 11:21:08
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This open access book sets out to explain the reasons for the gap between “knowing” and “doing” in view of self-reliance, which is more and more often expected of citizens. In today’s society, people are expected to take responsibility for their own lives and be self-reliant. This is no easy feat. They must be on constant high alert in areas of life such as health, work and personal finances and, if things threaten to go awry, take appropriate action without further ado. What does this mean for public policy? Policymakers tend to assume that the government only needs to provide people with clear information and that, once properly informed, they will automatically do the right thing. However, it is becoming increasingly obvious that things do not work like that. Even though people know perfectly well what they ought to do, they often behave differently. Why is this? This book sets out to explain the reasons for the gap between ‘knowing’ and ‘doing’. It focuses on the role of non-cognitive capacities, such as setting goals, taking action, persevering and coping with setbacks, and shows how these capacities are undermined by adverse circumstances. By taking the latest psychological insights fully into account, this book presents a more realist perspective on self-reliance, and shows government officials how to design rules and institutions that allow for the natural limitations in people’s ‘capacity to act’.

Understanding Willing Participants, Volume 2

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ISBN: 9783319979991 Year: Pages: 328 DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-97999-1 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Nature
Subject: History --- Psychology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2020-02-05 11:21:14
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Horrified by the Holocaust, social psychologist Stanley Milgram wondered if he could recreate the Holocaust in the laboratory setting. Unabated for more than half a century, his (in)famous results have continued to intrigue scholars. Based on unpublished archival data from Milgram’s personal collection, volume one of this two-volume set introduces readers to a behind the scenes account showing how during Milgram’s unpublished pilot studies he step-by-step invented his official experimental procedure—how he gradually learnt to transform most ordinary people into willing inflictors of harm. The open access volume two then illustrates how certain innovators within the Nazi regime used the very same Milgram-like learning techniques that with increasing effectiveness gradually enabled them to also transform most ordinary people into increasingly capable executioners of other men, women, and children. Volume two effectively attempts to capture how step-by-step these Nazi innovators attempted to transform the Führer’s wish of a Jewish-free Europe into a frightening reality. By the books’ end the reader will gain an insight into how the seemingly undoable can become increasingly doable.

Internet and Mobile Phone Addiction. Health and Educational Effects

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ISBN: 9783038976042 Year: Pages: 328 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-605-9 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Psychology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-03-21 15:50:41
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Internet use-related addiction problems (e.g., Internet addiction, problem mobile phone use, problem gaming, and social networking) have been defined according to the same core element: the addictive symptomatology presented by individuals who excessively and problematically behave using the technology. Online activity is the most important factor in their lives, causing them the loss of control by stress and difficulties in managing at least one aspect of their daily life, affecting users’ wellbeing and health. In 2018, Gaming Disorder was included as a mental disease in the 11th Revision of the International Classification of Diseases by the World Health Organization. In 2013, the American Psychiatric Association requested additional research on Internet Gaming Disorder. The papers contained in this e-Book provide unique and original perspectives on the concept, development, and early detection of the prevention of these health problems. They are diverse in the nature of the problems they deal with, methodologies, populations, cultures, and contain insights and a clear indication of the impact of individual, social, and environmental factors on Internet use-related addiction problems. The e-Book illustrates recent progress in the evolution of research, with great emphasis on gaming and smartphone problems, signaling areas in which research would be useful, even cross-culturally.

Keywords

commuting --- well-being --- personality --- gender --- stress --- Internet addiction --- Internet gaming disorder --- game device usage pattern --- smartphone --- comorbidity --- Internet gaming disorder --- IGD --- emotional regulation --- cognitive reappraisal --- suppression --- depression --- hostility --- internet gaming disorder --- Dickman Impulsivity Inventory-Short Version (DII) --- Brief Self-Control Scale (BSCS) --- Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) --- Behavioral Inhibition System/Behavioral Activation System (BIS/BAS) --- Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5) --- gambling --- video-game addiction --- screen addiction --- immersion --- problematic Internet use --- comorbidity --- cognitive distortion --- problematic smartphone use --- smartphone addiction --- social media --- approaches to learning --- deep approach to learning --- surface approach to learning --- smartphone --- problematic mobile phone use --- convergent design --- focus group --- survey --- internet gaming disorder --- impulsivity --- depression --- interpersonal relationships --- serial mediation --- Internet addiction --- mobile phone addiction --- online social network --- university students --- technological addictions --- behavioral addictions --- CERI --- CERM --- mobile phone dependence --- mobile phone use --- impulsivity --- China --- Internet addiction --- Internet-use disorder --- Internet literacy --- expectancies --- personality --- cultural differences --- pathological video-game use --- Internet Gaming Disorder --- comorbid psychopathology --- review --- Internet Use Disorder --- prevalence --- epidemiology --- adolescence --- latent profile analysis --- anxiety --- depression --- Internet addiction --- smartphone addiction --- propensity score --- Internet addiction --- coping strategies --- personality traits --- young people --- mobile phone use --- smartphone use --- Problematic Mobile Phone Use --- Problematic Mobile Phone Use Questionnaire --- psychometric testing --- measurement invariance --- time --- gaming disorder --- interpersonal relations --- self-efficacy --- self-control --- expectations --- fear of missing out (FOMO) --- social media --- problematic social media use (PSMU) --- phubbing --- teenagers --- adolescents --- addiction --- internet addiction --- mobile phone (or smartphone) use --- young children --- early childhood education --- parenting --- emergent bilinguals --- intergenerational language transmission --- behavioural addictions --- generalised versus specific problem Internet uses --- Internet addiction --- gaming disorder --- social networking --- mixed methods research

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