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Early Film Cultures in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Republican China

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ISBN: 9780472073726 9780472123445 Year: Language: English
Publisher: University of Michigan Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 100855
Added to DOAB on : 2018-03-16 11:02:30
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This collection explores the complex world of early cinema in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. The story of how cinema established itself in China has not been well-understood. Cultural models for cinema-going and industry practices varied widely across China. By looking at several centers of cinematic activity, going beyond commercial fiction film to include non-fiction films (such as educational film), and taking on Cantonese as well as Mandarin productions. Beyond the Silver Screens presents early cinema in China in a new light Highlights Hong Kong, Taipei and Guangzhou as well as better-know examples from Shanghai, these essays foreground the cinema’s relationships with imperialism and colonialism, examining how cinematic culture established itself by adapting to distinctive local social and artistic practices, emphasizing the potency of cinema as a sociocultural institution.

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Spectacular Disappearances

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ISBN: 9780472900619 9780472119806 Year: Pages: 297 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_608305 Language: English
Publisher: University of Michigan Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched
Subject: Performing Arts
Added to DOAB on : 2016-05-22 11:01:30
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"How can people in the spotlight control their self-representations when the whole world seems to be watching? The question is familiar, but not new. Julia Fawcett examines the stages, pages, and streets of eighteenth-century London as England's first modern celebrities performed their own strange and spectacular self-representations. They include the enormous wig that actor Colley Cibber donned in his comic role as Lord Foppington--and that later reappeared on the head of Cibber's cross-dressing daughter, Charlotte Charke. They include the black page of Tristram Shandy, a memorial to the parson Yorick (and author Laurence Sterne), a page so full of ink that it cannot be read. And they include the puffs and prologues that David Garrick used to heighten his publicity while protecting his privacy; the epistolary autobiography, modeled on the sentimental novel, of Garrick's protégée George Anne Bellamy; and the elliptical poems and portraits of the poet, actress, and royal courtesan Mary Robinson, a.k.a. Perdita.

Linking all of these representations is a quality that Fawcett terms ""over-expression,"" the unique quality that allows celebrities to meet their spectators' demands for disclosure without giving themselves away. Like a spotlight so brilliant it is blinding, these exaggerated but illegible self-representations suggest a new way of understanding some of the key aspects of celebrity culture, both in the eighteenth century and today. They also challenge divides between theatrical character and novelistic character in eighteenth-century studies, or between performance studies and literary studies today. The book provides an indispensable history for scholars and students in celebrity studies, performance studies, and autobiography—and for anyone curious about the origins of the eighteenth-century self."

Civic Engagement in the Wake of Katrina

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ISBN: 9780472116980 9780472033522 9780472024483 Year: Language: English
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
Subject: Sociology
Added to DOAB on : 2012-04-06 14:29:55
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This collection of essays documents the ways in which educational institutions and the arts community responded to the devastation wrought by Hurricane Katrina. While firmly rooted in concrete projects, Civic Engagement in the Wake of Katrina also addresses the larger issues raised by committed public scholarship. How can higher education institutions engage with their surrounding communities? What are the pros and cons of ""asset-based"" and ""outreach"" models of civic engagement? Is it appropriate for the private sector to play a direct role in promoting civic engagement? How does public scholarship impact traditional standards of academic evaluation? Throughout the volume, this diverse collection of essays paints a remarkably consistent and persuasive account of arts-based initiatives' ability to foster social and civic renewal.

Is William Martinez Not Our Brother?

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ISBN: 9780472071098 9780472051090 9780472027446 Year: Language: English
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
Subject: Arts in general
Added to DOAB on : 2012-04-06 14:29:55
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Prisons are an invisible, but dominant, part of American society: the United States incarcerates more people than any other nation in the world. In Michigan, the number of prisoners rose from 3,000 in 1970 to more than 50,000 by 2008, a shift that Buzz Alexander witnessed firsthand when he came to teach at the University of Michigan. Is William Martinez Not Our Brother? describes the University of Michigan's Prison Creative Arts Project (PCAP), a pioneering program founded in 1990 that provides university courses, a nonprofit organization, and a national network for incarcerated youth and adults in Michigan juvenile facilities and prisons. By giving incarcerated individuals an opportunity to participate in the arts, PCAP enables them to withstand and often overcome the conditions and culture of prison, the policies of an incarcerating state, and the consequences of mass incarceration.

Mao Zedong’s “Talks at the Yan’an Conference on Literature and Art”

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Book Series: Michigan Monographs in Chinese Studies ISBN: 9780472901333 Year: Pages: 113 DOI: 10.3998/mpub.19066 Language: English
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
Subject: Arts in general
Added to DOAB on : 2020-09-05 00:02:09
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The writings of Mao Zedong have been circulated throughout the world more widely, perhaps, than those of any other single person this century. The “Talks at the Yan’an Conference on Literature and Art” has occupied a prominent position among his many works and has been the subject of intense scrutiny both within and outside China. This text has undoubted importance to modern Chinese literature and history. In particular, it reveals Mao’s views on such questions as the relationship between writers or works of literature and their audience, or the nature and value of different kinds of literary products. In this translation and commentary, Bonnie S. McDougall finds that Mao was in fact ahead of many of his critics in the West and his Chinese contemporaries in his discussion of literary issues. Unlike the majority of modern Chinese writers deeply influenced by Western theories of literature and society (including Marxism), Mao remained close to traditional patterns of thought and avoided the often mechanical or narrowly literal interpretations that were the hallmark of Western schools current in China in the early twentieth century. Many of the detailed discussions on the “Talks” in the West have been concerned with their political and historical significance. However, since Mao is a literary figure of some importance in twentieth-century China, McDougall finds it worthwhile to follow up his published remarks on the nature and source of literature and the means of its evaluation. By better understanding the complex and revolutionary ideas contained in the “Talks,” McDougall suggests we may acquire the necessary analytical tools for a more fruitful investigation into contemporary Chinese literature.

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