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Transgressions: critical Australian Indigenous histories

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Book Series: Aboriginal History Monograph ISBN: 9781921313431 Year: Pages: 249 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_459741 Language: English
Publisher: ANU Press
Subject: Anthropology --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2012-06-14 11:46:24
License: ANU Press

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This volume brings together an innovative set of readings of complex interactions between Australian Aboriginal people and colonisers. The underlying theme is that of ‘transgression’, and Michel Foucault’s account of the necessary dynamic that exists between transgression and limit. We know what constitutes the limit, not by tracing or re-stating the boundaries, but by crossing over them. By exploring the mechanisms by which limits are set and maintained, unexamined cultural assumptions and dominant ideas are illuminated. We see the expectations and the structures that inform and support them revealed, often as they unravel. Such illuminations and revelations are at the core of the Australian Indigenous histories presented in this collection.

The Land is a Map

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ISBN: 9781921536571 Year: Pages: 304 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_459353 Language: English
Publisher: ANU Press
Subject: Anthropology
Added to DOAB on : 2012-06-14 11:46:24
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The entire Australian continent was once covered with networks of Indigenous placenames. These names often evoke important information about features of the environment and their place in Indigenous systems of knowledge. On the other hand, placenames assigned by European settlers and officials are largely arbitrary, except for occasional descriptive labels such as ‘river, lake, mountain’. They typically commemorate people, or unrelated places in the Northern hemisphere. In areas where Indigenous societies remain relatively intact, thousands of Indigenous placenames are used, but have no official recognition. Little is known about principles of forming and bestowing Indigenous placenames. Still less is known about any variation in principles of placename bestowal found in different Indigenous groups. While many Indigenous placenames have been taken into the official placename system, they are often given to different features from those to which they originally applied. In the process, they have been cut off from any understanding of their original meanings. Attempts are now being made to ensure that additions of Indigenous placenames to the system of official placenames more accurately reflect the traditions they come from. The eighteen chapters in this book range across all of these issues. The contributors (linguistics, historians and anthropologists) bring a wide range of different experiences, both academic and practical, to their contributions. The book promises to be a standard reference work on Indigenous placenames in Australia for many years to come.

The Two Rainbow Serpents travelling: Mura track narratives from the 'Corner Country'

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ISBN: 9781921536939 Year: Pages: 93 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_459747 Language: English
Publisher: ANU Press
Subject: Religion
Added to DOAB on : 2012-06-14 11:46:24
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The ‘Corner Country’, where Queensland, South Australia and New South Wales now converge, was in Aboriginal tradition crisscrossed by the tracks of the mura, ancestral beings, who named the country as they travelled, linking place to language. Reproduced here is the story of the two Ngatyi, Rainbow Serpents, who travelled from the Paroo to the Flinders Ranges and back as far as Yancannia Creek, where their deep underground channels linked them back to the Paroo. Jeremy Beckett recorded these stories from George Dutton and Alf Barlow in 1957. Luise Hercus, who has worked on the languages in the area for many years, has collaborated with Jeremy Beckett to analyse the names and identify the places.

Indigenous participation in Australian economies

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ISBN: 9781921666872 Year: Pages: 195 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_459284 Language: English
Publisher: ANU Press
Subject: Economics --- Anthropology
Added to DOAB on : 2012-06-14 11:46:24
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This volume seeks to contribute to the body of anthropological and historical studies of Indigenous participation in the Australian colonial and post colonial economy. It arises out of a panel on this topic at the annual conference of the Australian Anthropological Society, held jointly with the British and New Zealand anthropological associations in Auckland in December 2008. The panel was organised in conjunction with an Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkage Grant project on Indigenous participation in Australian economies involving the National Museum of Australia as the partner organisation and the School of Archaeology and Anthropology at The Australian National University. The chapters of the volume bring new theoretical analyses and empirical data to bear on a continuing discussion about the variety of ways in which Indigenous people in Australia have been engaged in the colonial and post-colonial economy. Contributions cover settler capitalism, concepts of property on the frontier, Torres Strait Islanders in the mainland economy, the pastoral industry in the Kimberley, doggers in the Western Desert, bean and pea picking on the South Coast of New South Wales, attitudes to employment in general in western New South Wales, relations of Aboriginal people to mining in the Pilbara, and relations with the uranium mine and Kakadu National Park in the Top End. The chapters also contribute to discussions about theoretical and analytical frameworks relevant to these kinds of contexts and bring critical perspectives to bear on current issues of development.

Ethnography and the Production of Anthropological Knowledge

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ISBN: 9781921666971 Year: Pages: 245 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_459098 Language: English
Publisher: ANU Press
Subject: Anthropology
Added to DOAB on : 2012-06-14 11:46:24
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Professor Nicolas Peterson is a central figure in the anthropology of Aboriginal Australia. This volume honours his anthropological body of work, his commitment to ethnographic fieldwork as a source of knowledge, his exemplary mentorship of generations of younger scholars and his generosity in facilitating the progress of others. The diverse collection produced by former students, current colleagues and long-term peers provides reflections on his legacy as well as fresh anthropological insights from Australia and the wider Asia-Pacific region. Inspired by Nicolas Peterson’s work in Aboriginal Australia and his broad ranging contributions to anthropology over several decades, the contributors to this volume celebrate the variety of his ethnographic interests. Individual chapters address, revisit, expand on, and ethnographically re-examine his work about ritual, material culture, the moral domestic economy, land and ecology. The volume also pays homage to Nicolas Peterson’s ability to provide focused research with long-term impact, exemplified by a series of papers engaging with his work on demand sharing and the applied policy domain

Dharmalan Dana

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9781925021493 Year: DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_477340 Language: English
Publisher: ANU Press
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2014-05-22 11:01:05
License: ANU Press

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A Yorta Yorta man’s seventy-three-year search for the story of his Aboriginal and Indian ancestors including his Indian Grampa who, as a real mystery man, came to Yorta Yorta country in Australia, from Mauritius, in 1881 and went on to leave an incredible legacy for Aboriginal Australia. This story is written through George Nelson’s eyes, life and experiences, from the time of his earliest memory, to his marriage to his sweetheart Brenda, through to his journey to Mauritius at the age of seventy-three, to the production of this wonderful story in the present.

Keywords

australia --- aboriginal --- indian --- ancestors --- mauritius

Henry Prinsep's Empire

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ISBN: 9781925021608 Year: DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_502536 Language: English
Publisher: ANU Press
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2014-10-14 11:01:09
License: ANU Press

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Henry Prinsep is known as Western Australia’s first Chief Protector of Aborigines in the colonial government of Sir John Forrest, a period which saw the introduction of oppressive laws that dominated the lives of Aboriginal people for most of the twentieth century. But he was also an artist, horse-trader, member of a prominent East India Company family, and everyday citizen, whose identity was formed during his colonial upbringing in India and England. As a creator of Imperial culture, he supported the great men and women of history while he painted, wrote about and photographed the scenes around him. In terms of naked power he was a middle man, perhaps even a small man. His empire is an intensely personal place, a vast network of family and friends from every quarter of the British imperial world, engaged in the common tasks of making a home and a career, while framing new identities, new imaginings and new relationships with each other, indigenous peoples and fellow colonists. This book traces Henry Prinsep’s life from India to Western Australia and shows how these texts and images illuminate not only Prinsep the man, but the affectionate bonds that endured despite the geographic bounds of empire, and the historical, social, geographic and economic origins of Aboriginal and colonial relationships which are important to this day.

Keywords

henry prinsep --- australia --- history --- aboriginal

In the Eye of the Beholder: What Six Nineteenth-century Women Tell Us About Indigenous Authority and Identity

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ISBN: 9781925021974 Year: Pages: 195 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_515954 Language: English
Publisher: ANU Press
Subject: Sociology
Added to DOAB on : 2015-02-01 11:01:31
License: ANU Press

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This book offers a fresh perspective in the debate on settler perceptions of Indigenous Australians.

Settler Colonial Governance in Nineteenth-Century Victoria

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ISBN: 9781925022346 Year: DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_569095 Language: English
Publisher: ANU Press
Subject: History --- Migration
Added to DOAB on : 2015-07-14 11:01:17
License: ANU Press

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This collection represents a serious re-examination of existing work on the Aboriginal history of nineteenth-century Victoria, deploying the insights of postcolonial thought to wrench open the inner workings of territorial expropriation and its historically tenacious variability. Colonial historians have frequently asserted that the management and control of Aboriginal people in colonial Victoria was historically exceptional; by the end of the century, colonies across mainland Australia looked to Victoria as a ‘model’ for how to manage the problem of Aboriginal survival. This collection carefully traces the emergence and enactment of this ‘model’ in the years after colonial separation, the idiosyncrasies of its application and the impact it had on Aboriginal lives.

Journeys into the Rainforest (Terra Australis 43)

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ISBN: 9781925022872 Year: DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_603159 Language: English
Publisher: ANU Press
Subject: Archaeology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-02-23 11:01:19
License: ANU Press

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This monograph presents the results of archaeological research that takes a longitudinal approach to interpreting and understanding Aboriginal–European contact. It focuses on a small but unique area of tropical rainforest in far north Queensland’s Wet Tropics Bioregion, located within the traditional lands of the Jirrbal Aboriginal people on the Evelyn Tableland. The research integrates a diverse range of data sources: archaeological evidence recovered from Aboriginal open sites occupied in the pre- to post-contact periods, historical documents of early ethnographers, settlers and explorers in the region, supplemented with Aboriginal oral history testimony. Analyses of the archaeological evidence excavated from three open sites facilitated the identification of the trajectories of culture change and continuity that this investigation focused on: Aboriginal rainforest material culture and technology, plant subsistence strategies, and rainforest settlement patterns. Analyses of the data sets demonstrate that initial use of the rainforest environment on the Evelyn Tableland occurred during the early Holocene period, with successful adaptation and a change towards more permanent Aboriginal use of the rainforest becoming established in the late Holocene period. European arrival and settlement on traditional Aboriginal land resulted in a period of historical upheaval for the Aboriginal rainforest people. Following an initial period of violent interactions and strong Aboriginal resistance from the rainforest, Jirrbal Aboriginal people continued to adapt and transform their traditional culture to accommodate for the many changes forced upon them throughout the post‑contact period.

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