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Immunobiotics: Interactions of Beneficial Microbes with the Immune System

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889453825 Year: Pages: 309 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-382-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Allergy and Immunology --- Science (General) --- Microbiology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-11-16 17:17:57
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The term “immunobiotics” has been proposed to define microbial strains able to beneficially regulate the mucosal immune system. Research in immunobiotics has significantly evolved as researchers employed cutting-edge technologies to investigate the complex interactions of these beneficial microorganisms with the immune system. During the last decade, our understanding of immunobiotics-host interaction was profoundly transformed by the discovery of microbial molecules and host receptors involved in the modulation of gut associated immune system, as well as the systemic and distant mucosal immune systems. In recent years, there has been a substantial increase in the number of reports describing the beneficial effects of immunobiotics in diseases such as intestinal and respiratory infections, allergy, inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, immunosuppression, and several other immune-mediated conditions. Evidence is also emerging of immunobiotics related molecules with immunomodulatory functions leading to the production of pharmabiotics, which may positively influence human or animal health. Therefore, research in immunobiotics continue to contribute not only to food but also medical and pharmaceutical fields. The compilation of research articles included in this ebook should help reader to have an overview of the recent advances in immunobiotics.

Parasite Infections: From Experimental Models to Natural Systems

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889454853 Year: Pages: 294 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-485-3 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Internal medicine
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:42
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Eukaryotic parasites (including parasitic protozoans, worms and arthropods) are more complex and heterogeneous organisms than pathogenic bacteria and viruses. This notion implies different evolutionary strategies of host exploitation. Typically, parasites establish long-term infections and induce relatively little mortality, as they often limit pathological changes by modulating host cells and downregulating adverse immune responses. Their pattern of distribution tends to be endemic rather than epidemic. Despite these seemingly benign traits, parasites usually cause substantial chronic morbidity, thus constituting an enormous socioeconomic burden in humans, particularly in resource poor countries, and in livestock worldwide. Parasite-induced fitness costs are an evolutionary force that can shape populations and contribute to species diversity. Therefore, a thorough understanding of parasites and parasitic diseases requires detailed knowledge of the respective biochemical, molecular and immunological aspects as well as of population genetics, epidemiology and ecology. This Research Topic (RT) bridges disciplines to connect molecular, immunological and wildlife aspects of parasitic infections. The RT puts emphases on four groups of parasites: Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Giardia and intestinal helminths. Co-infections are also covered by the RT as they represent the most common form of parasite infections in wildlife and domestic animal populations. Within the four types of parasites the following topics are addressed: (1) Experimental models: hypothesis testing, translation and limits. (2) Critical appraisal of experimental models. (3) Natural systems: Technological advances for investigations in natural parasite-host systems and studies in natural systems. (4) The urgent need for better models and methods in natural parasite systems. Hence, the RT covers and illustrate by the means of four main parasitic infections the parasite-host system at the molecular, cellular and organismic level.

Microbial Modulation of Host Apoptosis and Pyroptosis

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889192809 Year: Pages: 109 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-280-9 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Internal medicine --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-10 11:59:06
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Infectious disease is the result of an interactive relationship between a microbial pathogen and its host. In this interaction both the host and the pathogen attempt to manipulate each other using a complex network to maximize their respective survival probabilities. Programmed host cell death is a direct outcome of host-pathogen interaction and may benefit host or pathogen depending on microbial pathogenesis. Apoptosis and pyroptosis are two common programmed cell death types induced by various microbial infections. Apoptosis is non-inflammatory programmed cell death and can be triggered through intrinsic or extrinsic pathways and with or without the contribution of mitochondria. Pyroptosis is an inflammatory cell death and is typically triggered by caspase-1 after its activation by various inflammasomes. However, some non-canonical caspase-1-independent proinflammatory cell death phenomena have been reported. Microbial pathogens are able to modulate host apoptosis and pyroptosis through different triggers and pathways. The promotion and inhibition of host apoptosis and pyroptosis vary and depend on the microbe types, virulence, and phenotypes. For example, virulent pathogens and attenuated vaccine strains may use different pathways to modulate host cell death. Specific microbial genes may be responsible for the modulation of host cell death. Different host cells, including macrophages, dendritic cells, and T cells, can undergo apoptosis and pyroptosis after microbial infections. The pathways of host apoptosis and pyroptosis induced by different microbes may also differ. Different methods can be used to study the interaction between microbes and host cell death system. The articles included in this E-book report the cutting edge findings in the areas of microbial modulation of host apoptosis, pyroptosis and inflammasome.

Gene function in schistosomes: recent advances towards a cure

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889195565 Year: Pages: 154 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-556-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Ecology --- Science (General) --- Genetics --- Microbiology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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Schistosomes are human parasites distributed worldwide in tropical and sub-tropical latitudes, especially in developing countries and impoverished regions. These neglected tropical disease (NTD) pathogens causes debilitating illnesses, which include hepatosplenomegaly, hepatic fibrosis, haemorrhagic necrotic ulcerations in the intestinal mucosa, urogenital tract diseases, in addition to cardiopulmonary, renal and neurologic lesions due to egg accumulation in the liver, intestines, uro-genital tissues and other sites. Urogenital schistosomiasis is a risk factor for bladder cancer and increases the risk of transmission of HIV infection. Despite extensive effort to control this NTD over the years, deployment on a considerable scale of commercially available drugs in endemic populations has induced the emergence of resistant isolates and raised the need to identify new targets for alternative therapies. Because of the availability of genomes of the three major species of human schistosomiasis, and through advances in functional genomics and live imaging, studies on schistosomes have now come into focus as models to investigate adaptations to parasitism and developmental biology of trematodes and cestodes, and indeed flatworms and Lophotrochozoans, at large. This Research Topic aims at gathering state-of-art essays on schistosome genetics, genetics, pathobiology and immunobiology. It also aims to highlight advances in understanding of the host-parasite relationship, in paradigms that address this NTD, and to discuss new perspectives and advances in chemotherapy and immunoprophylaxis.

How Salmonella infection can inform on mechanisms of immune function and homeostasis

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889197996 Year: Pages: 143 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-799-6 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-02-03 17:04:57
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The use of model antigens such as haptens and ovalbumin has provided enormous insights into how immune responses develop, particularly to vaccine antigens. Furthermore, these studies are overwhelmingly performed in animals housed in clean facilities and are not known to have experienced overt clinical signs caused by infectious agents. Therefore, this is unlikely to reflect the impact more complex host-pathogen interactions can have on the host, nor the diversity in how immunity is regulated. Humans develop immune responses in the context of the periodic exposure to multiple pathogens and vaccines over a life-time. These are likely to have a long-lasting effect on who and what we are and how we respond to further antigen challenge. Therefore, studies on how infection influences immune homeostasis and how the development of responses to a pathogen reflects what is known on immune regulation will be informative on how we can translate findings from our standard models into treatments usable in humans. One organism allows us to do just this. Bacteria of the genus Salmonella are devastating human pathogens. Nevertheless, many aspects of the diseases they cause can be successfully modelled in murine systems so that the infection is either resolving or non-resolving. This has the advantage of allowing the long-term impact of infection on immune function to be assessed. We propose to welcome key workers to write about their research that examine the consequence of Salmonella infection on the host and the elements of the bacterium that contribute to this.

Insights into Microbe-Microbe Interactions in Human Microbial Ecosystems: Strategies to be Competitive

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889450527 Year: Pages: 116 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-052-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Microbiology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-07-06 13:27:36
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All parts of our body having communication with the external environment such as the skin, vagina, the respiratory tract or the gastrointestinal tract are colonized by a specific microbial community. The colon is by far the most densely populated organ in the human body. The pool of microbes inhabiting our body is known as “microbiota” and their collective genomes as “microbiome”. These microbial ecosystems regulate important functions of the host, and their functionality and the balance among the diverse microbial populations is essential for the maintenance of a “healthy status”. The impressive development in recent years of next generation sequencing (NGS) methods have made possible to determine the gut microbiome composition. This, together with the application of other high throughput omic techniques and the use of gnotobiotic animals has greatly improved our knowledge of the microbiota acting as a whole. In spite of this, most members of the human microbiota are largely unknown and remain still uncultured. The final functionality of the microbiota is depending not only on nutrient availability and environmental conditions, but also on the interrelationships that the microorganisms inhabiting the same ecological niche are able to establish with their partners, or with their potential competitors. Therefore, in such a competitive environment microorganisms have had to develop strategies allowing them to cope, adapt, or cooperate with their neighbors, which may imply notable changes at metabolic, physiological and genetic level. The main aim of this Research Topic was to contribute to better understanding complex interactions among microorganisms residing in human microbial habitats.All parts of our body having communication with the external environment such as the skin, vagina, the respiratory tract or the gastrointestinal tract are colonized by a specific microbial community. The colon is by far the most densely populated organ in the human body. The pool of microbes inhabiting our body is known as “microbiota” and their collective genomes as “microbiome”. These microbial ecosystems regulate important functions of the host, and their functionality and the balance among the diverse microbial populations is essential for the maintenance of a “healthy status”. The impressive development in recent years of next generation sequencing (NGS) methods have made possible to determine the gut microbiome composition. This, together with the application of other high throughput omic techniques and the use of gnotobiotic animals has greatly improved our knowledge of the microbiota acting as a whole. In spite of this, most members of the human microbiota are largely unknown and remain still uncultured. The final functionality of the microbiota is depending not only on nutrient availability and environmental conditions, but also on the interrelationships that the microorganisms inhabiting the same ecological niche are able to establish with their partners, or with their potential competitors. Therefore, in such a competitive environment microorganisms have had to develop strategies allowing them to cope, adapt, or cooperate with their neighbors, which may imply notable changes at metabolic, physiological and genetic level. The main aim of this Research Topic was to contribute to better understanding complex interactions among microorganisms residing in human microbial habitats.

Vitamin C in Health and Disease

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ISBN: 9783038970293 9783038970309 Year: Pages: X, 288 Language: english
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Cardiovascular
Added to DOAB on : 2018-08-09 11:31:26
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Vitamin C is a pivotal water soluble electron donor in nature and an essential nutrient in man. Despite its many years as a research focus, new and increasingly regulatory functions of vitamin C in human health are continually being unravelled. This improved mechanistic insight is starting to provide rationales explaining the extensive epidemiological literature that, for decades, has consistently shown strong associations between poor vitamin C status and increased morbidity and mortality.In this Special Issue, we include original research and literature reviews by experts in the field outlining the roles of vitamin C in early, daily and late life, as well as the roles of deficiency in cardiovascular disease, inflammation and cancer.

The Second Life of Natural Killer (NK) Cells

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889455461 Year: Pages: 118 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-546-1 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Allergy and Immunology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:42
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Natural Killer (NK) cells are innate lymphocytes, now recognized as members of a larger family of “Innate lymphoid cells” (ILCs). Both murine and human NK cells are well characterized effector cells with cytotoxic as well as cytokine production ability which mainly react in response to microbial and cell stress stimuli, thus playing a central role in the defense against pathogen infection, in tumor surveillance and in regulating immune homeostasis. Despite these established concepts, our understanding of the complexity of NK cells, also in view of their developmental and functional relationship with other ILC subsets, is only recently emerging. This Research Topic highlights the recent advances in NK cell (and ILC) research in human and mouse from basic research to clinical applications.

Infection and Inflammation: Potential Triggers of Sudden Infant Deaths

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889450497 Year: Pages: 94 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-049-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Allergy and Immunology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-02-27 16:16:44
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There is a growing body of evidence that infectious agents or their products contribute to events leading to unexpected infant deaths. This issue summarizes the current information on the interactions between genetic background of the infant, environmental and developmental risk factors, and the microbial flora of the infant that could trigger lethal responses to common infections.

Novel Pharmacological Inhibitors for Bacterial Protein Toxins

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ISBN: 9783038424314 9783038424307 Year: Pages: VI, 118 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Public Health --- Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2017-06-13 09:39:34
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Many medically relevant bacteria cause severe human and animal diseases because they produce and release protein toxins that target mammalian cells. Because the toxin-induced cell damage is the reason for the clinical symptoms, the targeted pharmacological inhibition of the cytotoxic mode of action of bacterial toxins should prevent or cure the respective toxin-associated disease. Toxin inhibitors might be beneficial when the toxin acts in the absence of the producing bacteria (e.g., food poisoning), but also in combination with antibiotics in infectious diseases when the toxin-producing bacteria are present. The focus of this Special Issue of Toxins is on the development and characterization of novel inhibitors against bacterial toxins, e.g., toxin neutralizing antibodies, peptides or small compounds, as well as toxin pore blockers, which interfere with bacterial toxins and thereby protect cells from intoxication.

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