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Healing Magic and Evil Demons. Canonical Udug-hul Incantations

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ISBN: 9781614513094 9781614515326 9781501500152 Year: Pages: 735 DOI: 10.1515/9781614513094 Language: English
Publisher: De Gruyter Grant: FP7 Ideas: European Research Council
Subject: Archaeology --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2019-10-02 11:21:07

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Abstract

This book brings together ancient manuscripts of the large compendium of Mesopotamian exorcistic incantations known as Udug.hul (Utukku Lemnutu), directed against evil demons, ghosts, gods, and other demonic malefactors within the Mesopotamian view of the world.It allows for a more accurate appraisal of variants arising from a text tradition spread over more than two millennia and from many ancient libraries.

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Udug.hul --- Mesopotamia --- incantations

Chapter Udug (Book chapter)

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ISBN: 9783110346602 Year: Language: German|English|French
Publisher: De Gruyter Grant: FP7 Ideas: European Research Council - 323596
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2019-11-20 11:21:18

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Assyriology; Mesopotamia; Ancient Near East

Studies in Multilingualism, Lingua Franca and Lingua Sacra

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Book Series: Max Planck Research Library for the History and Development of Knowledge Studies ISBN: 9783945561133 Year: Pages: 543 Language: English
Publisher: Edition Open Access Max Planck Institute for the History of Science Grant: FP7 Ideas: European Research Council - 323596
Subject: Linguistics
Added to DOAB on : 2019-04-11 11:21:07
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The present book comprises a number of studies centered around the topic of how knowledge diffuses from one culture to another, and how knowledge diffusion is connected with the spread of languages and the conceptual systems they carry by translation. This diffusion also takes place also over linguistic borders, in the way that a given receiving language may also absorb systems of knowledge from languages that are linguistically quite unrelated but culturally connected with respect to knowledge transfer. Thus we find that Sumerian concepts with considerable impact were moved into the Akkadian language, along with writing-systems, religion, science and literature, even though linguistically the languages are completely unrelated. Another example is how Chinese culture and writing systems spread throughout East Asia into Korea, Japan and Vietnam, though the languages of these countries were linguistically unrelated to Chinese. The same case can be made for Buddhist ways of thinking when it was clothed in the garb of Chinese or Tibetan, or one of the other languages along the Silk Road. This is also true for the spread of Manicheism, as it was portrayed in a great number of languages, related or unrelated. German and Latin are linguistically related, but when Latin learning was communicated in Old High German, many of its terms were created in Middle German to accommodate the Latin conceptual world, and the German language was lastingly enriched with novisms denoting concepts of the Classical traditions of learning, in a process parallel to the spread of Greek Christianity into the East European cultures and languages. The book describes some cases of such knowledge transfer and what kind of mechanisms are involved in the ensuing language changes in the receiving languages and cultures.

Keywords

Multilingualism --- culture --- languages

Mesopotamian Eye Disease Texts. The Nineveh Treatise

Authors: ---
Book Series: Die babylonisch-assyrische Medizin in Texten und Untersuchungen ISBN: 9781501506550 Year: Volume: Band 10 Pages: 350,00 DOI: 10.1515/9783110674255 Language: English / other languages
Publisher: De Gruyter
Subject: Religion --- The Bible
Added to DOAB on : 2020-11-12 19:29:15
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There is to date no comprehensive treatment of eye disease texts from ancient Mesopotamia, and no English translation of this material is available. This volume is the first complete edition and commentary on Mesopotamian medicine from Nineveh dealing with diseases of the eye. This ancient work, languishing in British Museum archives since the 19th century, is preserved on several large cuneiform manuscripts from the royal library of Ashurbanipal, from the 7th century BC. The longest surviving ancient work on diseased eyes, the text predates by several centuries corresponding Hippocratic treatises. The Nineveh series represents a systematic array of eye symptoms and therapies, also showing commonalities with Egyptian and Greco-Roman medicine. Since scholars of Near Eastern civilizations and ancient and general historians of medicine will need to be familiar with this material, the volume makes this aspect of Babylonian medicine fully accessible to both specialists and non-specialists, with all texts being fully translated into English.

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