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Covenant, compassion and marketisation in healthcare (Book chapter)

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ISBN: 9781138735736 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2018-01-17 11:02:33
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‘No one can serve two masters . . . You cannot serve God and Mammon.’ Jesus’ famous words, cited to different purposes by Miran Epstein and Adrian Walsh in this volume, provide a starting point for this chapter’s constructive argument and critical conversation with the chapters in this middle part. Epstein deploys Jesus’ words to deny the possibility of any constructive reconciliation between capitalism and healthcare, contrasting Jesus’ saying with the infamous words of Christian conquistadores and with what he claims is the inherently corrupting, master-slave ethic of the Deuteronomic covenant. By contrast, Walsh cites Jesus to explain Judeo- Christian cultural suspicions about money’s place in healthcare before delineating the potentially, though not necessarily, corrosive effects of marketisation

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health care --- social care

Compassion in primary and community healthcare (Book chapter)

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ISBN: 9781498769679 9781315155487 Year: Pages: 8 Language: English
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Grant: Wellcome Trust||Arts and Humanities Research Council - 105605||AH/N009770/1
Subject: Psychiatry
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-17 11:46:29
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Compassion is an attribute of a person’s affective understanding, which aims to enable, so far as possible, shared experiences of the world’s ills and some alleviation of those ills’ effects. Such an attribute is thus of great value within healthcare institutions such as general practices and other primary and community healthcare settings. It may characterise the people who participate in those institutions; or, it may not so characterise them. The appearance of compassion, under certain conditions and even in fragile and incomplete forms, is a kind of human excellence, a way of being for the good in community.* Compassion is not, therefore, a commodity, to be bought, sold and traded. Although time can be costed, there is no line for compassion in any budget. Were compassion to be thought a commodity, one could imagine trading it off against some more measurable factor (efficiency, cost-effectiveness, etc.). However, our human capacity for compassion, though fragile, tends to resist such marginalisation and reductionism.

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