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Signal Transduction in Stomatal Guard Cells

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889451678 Year: Pages: 105 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-167-8 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Botany --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-08-28 14:01:09
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Stomata, the tiny pores on leaf surface, are the gateways for CO2 uptake during photosynthesis as well as water loss in transpiration. Further, plants use stomatal closure as a defensive response, often triggered by elicitors, to prevent the entry of pathogens. The guard cells are popular model systems to study the signalling mechanism in plant cells. The messengers that mediate closure upon perception of elicitors or microbe associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) are quite similar to those during ABA effects. These components include reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), cytosolic pH and intracellular Ca2+. The main components are ROS, NO and cytosolic free Ca2+. The list extends to others, such as G-proteins, protein phosphatases, protein kinases, phospholipids and ion channels. The sequence of these signalling components and their interaction during stomatal signalling are complex and quite interesting. The present e-Book provides a set of authoritative articles from ‘Special Research Topic’ on selected areas of stomatal guard cells. In the first set of two articles, an overview of ABA and MAMPs as signals is presented. The next set of 4 articles, emphasize the role of ROS, NO, Ca2+ as well as pH, as secondary messengers. The next group of 3 articles highlight the recent advances on post-translational modification of guard cell proteins, with emphasis on 14-3-3 proteins and MAPK cascades. The last article described the method to isolate epidermis of grass species and monitor stomatal responses to different signals. Our e-Book is a valuable and excellent source of information for all those interested in guard cell function as well as signal transduction in plant cells.

Salinity Tolerance in Plants

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ISBN: 9783039210268 9783039210275 Year: Pages: 422 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-027-5 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Biochemistry
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-26 10:09:00
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Salt stress is one of the most damaging abiotic stresses because most crop plants are susceptible to salinity to different degrees. According to the FAO, about 800 million Has of land are affected by salinity worldwide. Unfortunately, this situation will worsen in the context of climate change, where there will be an overall increase in temperature and a decrease in average annual rainfall worldwide. This Special Issue presents different research works and reviews on the response of plants to salinity, focused from different points of view: physiological, biochemical, and molecular levels. Although an important part of the studies on the response to salinity have been carried out with Arabidopsis plants, the use of other species with agronomic interest is also notable, including woody plants. Most of the conducted studies in this Special Issue were focused on the identification and characterization of candidate genes for salt tolerance in higher plants. This identification would provide valuable information about the molecular and genetic mechanisms involved in the salt tolerance response, and it also supplies important resources to breeding programs for salt tolerance in plants.

Keywords

Arabidopsis --- Brassica napus --- ion homeostasis --- melatonin --- NaCl stress --- nitric oxide --- redox homeostasis --- Chlamydomonas reinhardtii --- bZIP transcription factors --- salt stress --- transcriptional regulation --- photosynthesis --- lipid accumulation --- Apocyni Veneti Folium --- salt stress --- multiple bioactive constituents --- physiological changes --- multivariate statistical analysis --- banana (Musa acuminata L.) --- ROP --- genome-wide identification --- abiotic stress --- salt stress --- MaROP5g --- rice --- genome-wide association study --- salt stress --- germination --- natural variation --- Chlamydomonas reinhardtii --- salt stress --- transcriptome analysis --- impairment of photosynthesis --- underpinnings of salt stress responses --- chlorophyll fluorescence --- J8-1 plum line --- mandelonitrile --- Prunus domestica --- redox signalling --- salicylic acid --- salt-stress --- soluble nutrients --- Arabidopsis thaliana --- VOZ --- transcription factor --- salt stress --- transcriptional activator --- chlorophyll fluorescence --- lipid peroxidation --- Na+ --- photosynthesis --- photosystem --- RNA binding protein --- nucleolin --- salt stress --- photosynthesis --- light saturation point --- booting stage --- transcriptome --- grapevine --- salt stress --- ROS detoxification --- phytohormone --- transcription factors --- Arabidopsis --- CDPK --- ion homeostasis --- NMT --- ROS --- salt stress --- antioxidant enzymes --- Arabidopsis thaliana --- ascorbate cycle --- hydrogen peroxide --- reactive oxygen species --- salinity --- SnRK2 --- RNA-seq --- DEUs --- flax --- NaCl stress --- EST-SSR --- Salt stress --- Oryza sativa --- proteomics --- iTRAQ quantification --- cell membrane injury --- root activity --- antioxidant systems --- ion homeostasis --- melatonin --- salt stress --- signal pathway --- SsMAX2 --- Sapium sebiferum --- drought, osmotic stress --- salt stress --- redox homeostasis --- strigolactones --- ABA --- TGase --- photosynthesis --- salt stress --- polyamines --- cucumber --- abiotic stresses --- high salinity --- HKT1 --- halophytes --- glycophytes --- poplars (Populus) --- salt tolerance --- molecular mechanisms --- SOS --- ROS --- Capsicum annuum L. --- CaDHN5 --- salt stress --- osmotic stress --- dehydrin --- Gossypium arboretum --- salt tolerance --- single nucleotide polymorphisms --- association mapping. --- n/a

Viticulture and Winemaking under Climate Change

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ISBN: 9783039219742 9783039219759 Year: Pages: 294 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-975-9 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Meteorology and Climatology
Added to DOAB on : 2020-01-07 09:08:26
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The importance of viticulture and the winemaking socio-economic sector is acknowledged worldwide. The most renowned winemaking regions show very specific environmental characteristics, where climate usually plays a central role. Considering the strong influence of weather and climatic factors on grapevine yields and berry quality attributes, climate change may indeed significantly impact this crop. Recent trends already point to a pronounced increase in growing season mean temperatures, as well as changes in precipitation regimes, which have been influencing wine typicity across some of the most renowned winemaking regions worldwide. Moreover, several climate scenarios give evidence of enhanced stress conditions for grapevine growth until the end of the century. Although grapevines have high resilience, the clear evidence for significant climate change in the upcoming decades urges adaptation and mitigation measures to be taken by sector stakeholders. To provide hints on the abovementioned issues, we have edited a Special Issue entitled “Viticulture and Winemaking under Climate Change”. Contributions from different fields were considered, including crop and climate modeling, and potential adaptation measures against these threats. The current Special Issue allows for the expansion of scientific knowledge in these particular fields of research, as well as providing a path for future research.

Keywords

viticulture --- crop model --- phenology --- physiological processes --- climate --- micrometeorology --- microclimate --- climate change --- water limitation --- dry mass partitioning --- assimilation --- intercellular CO2 --- stomatal conductance --- leaf water potential --- Vitis vinifera L. --- production system --- S-ABA --- rate of anthocyanin accumulation --- CIRG --- bioactive compounds --- Botrytis cinerea --- low-input --- mechanical thinning --- viticultural training system --- yield formation --- leaf area --- table grapes --- photosynthesis --- berry composition --- phenolics --- natural hail --- grapevine --- phenology --- phenology modelling platform --- Touriga Franca --- Touriga Nacional --- climate change --- RCP4.5 --- EURO-CORDEX --- Douro wine region --- Portugal --- global warming --- technological and phenolic ripeness --- grape --- wine --- sensory analysis --- climate change --- elevated CO2 --- grapevine pest --- mealybug --- parasitoid --- FACE --- predawn water potential --- PRI --- remote sensing --- vineyards --- water status --- WI --- climate change --- Vitis vinifera L. --- general circulation model --- EURO-CORDEX --- phenological model --- grapevine --- Virtual Riesling --- climate change --- temperature --- plant architecture --- crop management --- modelling --- climate change --- viticulture --- adaptation --- temperature --- drought --- plant material --- rootstock --- training system --- phenology --- modeling --- Vitis vinifera --- autochthonous cultivar --- ’Uva Rey’ --- unmanned aerial vehicles --- vigour maps --- spatial variability --- normalized difference vegetation index --- crop water stress index --- crop surface model --- precision viticulture --- climate change --- multi-temporal analysis --- Vitis vinifera (L.) --- SO2 pads --- B. cinerea mold --- grape quality --- light micro-climates --- mitigation strategies --- kaolin --- irrigation --- Vitis vinifera L. --- grape berry tissues --- pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry --- photosynthesis --- photosynthetic pigments --- viticulture --- winemaking --- climatic influence --- climate change --- adaptation measures

Jasmonic Acid Pathway in Plants

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ISBN: 9783039284887 / 9783039284894 Year: Pages: 346 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03928-489-4 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Plant Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2020-06-09 16:38:57
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The plant hormone jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivative, an amino acid conjugate of JA (jasmonoyl isoleucine, JA-Ile), are signaling compounds involved in the regulation of defense and development in plants. The number of articles studying on JA has dramatically increased since the 1990s. JA is recognized as a stress hormone that regulates the plant response to biotic stresses such as herbivore and pathogen attacks, as well as abiotic stresses such as wounding and ultraviolet radiation. Recent studies have remarkably progressed the understanding of the importance of JA in the life cycle of plants. JA is directly involved in many physiological processes, including stamen growth, senescence, and root growth. JA regulates production of various metabolites such as phytoalexins and terpenoids. Many regulatory proteins involved in JA signaling have been identified by screening for Arabidopsis mutants. However, much more remains to be learned about JA signaling in other plant species. This Special Issue, “Jasmonic Acid Pathway in Plants”, contains 5 review and 15 research articles published by field experts. These articles will help with understanding the crucial roles of JA in its response to the several environmental stresses and development in plants.

Keywords

albino --- aroma --- Camellia sinensis --- chloroplast --- jasmonic acid --- light-sensitive --- stress --- tea --- volatile --- Panax ginseng --- gene expression --- ginsenoside --- methyl jasmonate --- MYB transcription factor --- dammarenediol synthase --- jasmonic acid --- signaling pathway --- environmental response --- biological function --- MeJA --- priming --- rice --- proteomics --- ROS --- chlorophyll fluorescence imaging --- MAP kinase --- jasmonate --- rice bacterial blight --- salicylic acid --- grain development --- Prunus avium --- Tuscan varieties --- jasmonic acid --- lipoxygenase --- bioinformatics --- gene expression --- heterotrimeric G proteins --- AtRGS1 --- jasmonates --- endocytosis --- diffusion dynamics --- Chinese flowering cabbage --- leaf senescence --- JA --- transcriptional activation --- adventitious rooting --- auxin --- ectopic metaxylem --- ectopic protoxylem --- ethylene --- hypocotyl --- jasmonates --- nitric oxide --- xylogenesis --- transcriptional regulators --- plant development --- jasmonic acid signaling --- gene expression --- Jasmonate-ZIM domain --- JAZ repressors --- Jas domain --- TIFY --- degron --- phylogenetic analysis --- ancestral sequences --- circadian clock --- jasmonic acid --- crosstalk --- jasmonic acid --- fatty acid desaturase --- multiseeded --- msd --- grain number --- MutMap --- sorghum --- Ralstonia solanacearum --- type III effector --- jasmonic acid --- salicylic acid --- Nicotiana plants --- PatJAZ6 --- jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathway --- Pogostemon cablin --- patchouli alcohol --- biosynthesis --- jasmonate --- salt response --- Zea mays --- ROS --- proline --- ABA biosynthesis --- jasmonic acid --- crosstalk --- gibberellic acid --- cytokinin --- auxin --- jasmonic acid --- opr3 --- stress defense --- quantitative proteomics --- abiotic stresses --- jasmonates --- JA-Ile --- JAZ repressors --- transcription factor --- signaling --- antioxidant enzyme activity --- elicitor --- methyl jasmonate --- secondary metabolite --- signal molecules --- n/a

Plant Protein and Proteome Altlas--Integrated Omics Analyses of Plants under Abiotic Stresses

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
ISBN: 9783039219605 / 9783039219612 Year: Pages: 558 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-961-2 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Botany
Added to DOAB on : 2020-06-09 16:38:57
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Integrative omics of plants in response to stress conditions play more crucial roles in the post-genomic era. High-quality genomic data provide more deeper understanding of how plants to survive under environmental stresses. This book is focused on concluding the recent progress in the Protein and Proteome Atlas in plants under different stresses. It covers various aspects of plant protein ranging from agricultural proteomics, structure and function of proteins, and approaches for protein identification and quantification.

Keywords

proteomic --- postharvest freshness --- ATP synthase --- ATP synthase CF1 alpha subunit (chloroplast) --- chlorophyll fluorescence parameters --- photosynthetic parameters --- drought stress --- Triticum aestivum L. --- comparative proteomic analysis --- iTRAQ --- VIGS --- Jatropha curcas --- phosphoproteomics --- seedling --- chilling stress --- regulated mechanism --- Alternanthera philoxeroides --- proteomic --- stem --- potassium --- stress --- Salinity stress --- Dunaliella salina --- isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation --- differentially abundant proteins --- proteomics --- arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi --- salt stress --- E. angustifolia --- proteomics --- wheat --- root --- wood vinegar --- drought stress --- ROS --- ABA --- proteome --- maize --- AGPase --- phosphorylation --- brittle-2 --- phos-tagTM --- MIPS --- exon-intron structure diversity --- Gossypium hirsutum --- loss-of-function mutant --- root cell elongation --- CHA-SQ-1 --- cytomorphology --- pollen abortion --- proteomics --- wheat --- cotton --- somatic embryogenesis --- transdifferentiation --- quantitative proteomics --- regulation and metabolism --- molecular basis --- concerted network --- maize --- phosphoproteomics --- salt tolerance --- label-free quantification --- root and shoot --- sugar beet --- salt stress --- S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase --- ROS --- antioxidant enzyme --- cotton --- somatic embryogenesis --- transdifferentiation --- widely targeted metabolomics --- purine metabolism --- flavonoid biosynthesis --- molecular and biochemical basis --- transcript-metabolite network --- leaf sheath --- maturation --- transcriptional dynamics --- transcriptome --- abiotic stress --- silicate limitation --- diatom --- iTRAQ --- proteomics --- photosynthesis --- carbon fixation --- natural rubber biosynthesis --- mass spectrometry --- rubber grass --- rubber latex --- shotgun proteomics --- Taraxacum kok-saghyz --- two-dimensional gel electrophoresis --- visual proteome map --- proteomics --- wheat --- drought --- leaf --- iTRAQ --- micro-exons --- constitutive splicing --- alternative splicing --- ancient genes --- domain --- radish --- heat stress --- transcriptome sequencing --- lncRNA --- miRNA --- physiological response --- Millettia pinnata --- woody oilseed plants --- seed development --- miRNA --- nitrogen fertilizer --- rice --- proteome --- cultivars --- nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) --- Nelumbo nucifera --- phylogeny --- genomics --- molecular mechanisms --- model plant --- proteomes --- iTRAQ --- filling kernel --- drought stress --- heat shock proteins --- Zea mays L. --- wucai --- low-temperature stress --- high-temperature stress --- proteomics --- redox homeostasis --- GLU1 --- glutathione --- heat response --- heat-sensitive spinach variety --- proteomics --- ROS scavenging --- inositol --- phosphatidylinositol --- phosphatase --- stress --- signaling pathway --- integrated omics --- plants under stress --- post-genomics era --- proteome atlas --- quantitative proteomics

Plant Genetics and Molecular Breeding

Author:
ISBN: 9783039211753 9783039211760 Year: Pages: 628 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-176-0 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-08-28 11:21:27
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The development of new plant varieties is a long and tedious process involving the generation of large seedling populations for the selection of the best individuals. While the ability of breeders to generate large populations is almost unlimited, the selection of these seedlings is the main factor limiting the generation of new cultivars. Molecular studies for the development of marker-assisted selection (MAS) strategies are particularly useful when the evaluation of the character is expensive, time-consuming, or with long juvenile periods. The papers published in the Special Issue “Plant Genetics and Molecular Breeding” report highly novel results and testable new models for the integrative analysis of genetic (phenotyping and transmission of agronomic characters), physiology (flowering, ripening, organ development), genomic (DNA regions responsible for the different agronomic characters), transcriptomic (gene expression analysis of the characters), proteomic (proteins and enzymes involved in the expression of the characters), metabolomic (secondary metabolites), and epigenetic (DNA methylation and histone modifications) approaches for the development of new MAS strategies. These molecular approaches together with an increasingly accurate phenotyping will facilitate the breeding of new climate-resilient varieties resistant to abiotic and biotic stress, with suitable productivity and quality, to extend the adaptation and viability of the current varieties.

Keywords

sugarcane --- cry2A gene --- particle bombardment --- stem borer --- resistance --- NPK fertilizers --- agronomic traits --- molecular markers --- quantitative trait loci --- common wild rice --- Promoter --- Green tissue-specific expression --- light-induced --- transgenic chrysanthemum --- WRKY transcription factor --- salt stress --- gene expression --- DgWRKY2 --- Cucumis sativus L. --- RNA-Seq --- DEGs --- sucrose --- ABA --- drought stress --- Aechmea fasciata --- squamosa promoter binding protein-like --- flowering time --- plant architecture --- bromeliad --- Oryza sativa --- endosperm development --- rice quality --- WB1 --- the modified MutMap method --- abiotic stress --- Cicer arietinum --- candidate genes --- genetics --- heat-stress --- molecular breeding --- metallothionein --- Brassica --- Brassica napus --- As3+ stress --- broccoli --- cytoplasmic male sterile --- bud abortion --- gene expression --- transcriptome --- RNA-Seq --- sesame --- genome-wide association study --- yield --- QTL --- candidate gene --- cabbage --- yellow-green-leaf mutant --- recombination-suppressed region --- bulk segregant RNA-seq --- differentially expressed genes --- marker–trait association --- haplotype block --- genes --- root traits --- D-genome --- genotyping-by-sequencing --- single nucleotide polymorphism --- durum wheat --- bread wheat --- complex traits --- Brassica oleracea --- Ogura-CMS --- iTRAQ --- transcriptome --- pollen development --- rice --- OsCDPK1 --- seed development, starch biosynthesis --- endosperm appearance --- Chimonanthus praecox --- nectary --- floral scent --- gene expression --- Prunus --- flowering --- bisulfite sequencing --- genomics --- epigenetics --- breeding --- AP2/ERF genes --- Bryum argenteum --- transcriptome --- gene expression --- stress tolerance --- SmJMT --- transgenic --- Salvia miltiorrhiza --- overexpression --- transcriptome --- phenolic acids --- Idesia polycarpa var --- glycine --- FAD2 --- linoleic acid --- oleic acid --- anther wall --- tapetum --- pollen accumulation --- OsGPAT3 --- rice --- cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) --- phytohormones --- differentially expressed genes --- pollen development --- Brassica napus --- Rosa rugosa --- RrGT2 gene --- Clone --- VIGS --- Overexpression --- Tobacco --- Flower color --- Anthocyanin --- sugarcane --- WRKY --- subcellular localization --- gene expression pattern --- protein-protein interaction --- transient overexpression --- soybean --- branching --- genome-wide association study (GWAS) --- near-isogenic line (NIL) --- BRANCHED1 (BRC1) --- TCP transcription factor --- Zea mays L. --- MADS transcription factor --- ZmES22 --- starch --- flowering time --- gene-by-gene interaction --- Hd1 --- Ghd7 --- rice --- yield trait --- Oryza sativa L. --- leaf shape --- yield trait --- molecular breeding --- hybrid rice --- nutrient use efficiency --- quantitative trait loci (QTLs), molecular markers --- agronomic efficiency --- partial factor productivity --- P. suffruticosa --- R2R3-MYB --- overexpression --- anthocyanin --- transcriptional regulation --- ethylene-responsive factor --- Actinidia deliciosa --- AdRAP2.3 --- gene expression --- waterlogging stress --- regulation --- Chrysanthemum morifolium --- WUS --- CYC2 --- gynomonoecy --- reproductive organ --- flower symmetry --- Hs1pro-1 --- cZR3 --- gene pyramiding --- Heterodera schachtii --- resistance --- tomato --- Elongated Internode (EI) --- QTL --- GA2ox7 --- n/a

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