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Is the Recent Burst of Therapeutic Anti-Tumor Antibodies the Tip of an Iceberg?

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889454624 Year: Pages: 305 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-462-4 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Allergy and Immunology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-11-16 17:17:57
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The high effectiveness of antibodies as anti-tumor therapeutic agents has led to a burst of research aiming to increase their therapeutic applications by the use of antibodies against new targets, new antibody formats or new combinations. In this e-book we present relevant research depicting the current efforts in the field.

Monoclonal Antibodies

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ISBN: 9783038428756 9783038428763 Year: Pages: X, 228 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Allergy and Immunology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-04-27 13:43:10
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Monoclonal antibodies are established in clinical practice for the treatment of cancer, and autoimmune and infectious diseases. The first generation of antibodies has been dominated by classical IgG antibodies, however, in the last decade, the field has advanced, and, nowadays, a large proportion of antibodies in development have been engineered. This Special Issue on "Monoclonal Antibodies" includes original manuscripts and reviews covering various aspects related to the discovery, analytical characterization, manufacturing and development of therapeutic and engineered antibodies.

Natural Antibodies in Health and Disease

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889454051 Year: Pages: 180 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-405-1 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Allergy and Immunology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-11-16 17:17:57
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Natural antibodies (NAbs) are found in normal individuals in the absence of exogenous antigenic stimulation. Natural antibodies rapidly recognize and protect against pathogens that have not been previously encountered. NAbs also cross-react with several self-antigens, which, besides their role as a first line of defense against pathogens, affords them the ability to perform important housekeeping functions in healthy organisms. Such housekeeping functions include the clearance of oxidized damaged structures and/or apoptotic cells, which prevents the induction of pro-inflammatory effects. In addition, NAbs play a role in preventing the expansion of specific auto-reactive clones, thereby behaving as regulatory elements in acute or chronic inflammation. To maintain the non-pathogenic balance between the dual pathogen/self-antigen cross-reactivities of NAbs, a strict regulation in NAb secretion and function is necessary to avoid autoimmune disease. Actually, some of the NAbs related auto-reactivities, such as anti-DNA and anti-MOG, have been associated with autoimmunity. Furthermore, NAbs have been shown to bind to ‘neo-self’ carbohydrate antigens on glycolipids and glycoproteins found on malignant but not normal cells, which suggests NAbs may take part in tumor immunosurveillance.Many aspects regarding NAbs have yet to be studied in more detail: the reactivity and function of NAbs in health and disease, the behavior of the NAb repertoire with increasing age, the regulation of natural antibody production and auto-reactivity, the ways to specifically activate NAbs producing cells with desired specificities, the characteristics of human NAbs, among others. This special topics eBook consists of a number of articles exploring the cells that produce NAbs as well as the characteristics, function, specificity, and/or the role of natural antibodies in health and disease.

Antibody Repertoire and Graft Outcome Following Solid Organ Transplantation

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889452415 Year: Pages: 176 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-241-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-10-13 14:57:01
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The first real major breakthrough that laid the basis of HLA antibody detection in the field of solid organ transplantation, came with the introduction of the complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) test in 1964 by Terasaki and McClelland. Since then, methods for antibody detection have evolved remarkably from conventional cell-based assays to the current advanced solid phase systems on the Luminex platform, with increasing degree of sensitivity and specificity. The latter have been indispensable for more accurate identification of donor specific HLA antibodies in broadly reactive allo antisera, and to guide donor selection and kidney paired exchange programs through virtual crossmatching, in addition to serving as excellent tools for initiating pre-transplant desensitization and post- transplant antibody monitoring. Consensus is evolving on the optimal routine employment of these methods in donor selection strategies along with an understanding of the clinical relevance of antibodies detected by each of them. The immunoassays based on the Luminex platform and flow cytometric beads are however unable to discriminate complement fixing from non-complement fixing HLA antibodies. This is important because the former are considered clinically more pertinent in the peri-transplant period. The C1q assay which is a modification of the solid phase assay based on Luminex single antigen beads, which can be used effectively to monitor high dose IVIG desensitization is essentially a surrogate complement fixing assay, retaining the exquisite sensitivity and specificity of the Luminex platform. Currently, information obtained from these assays is preliminary and much needs to be done to standardize technologies and set a consensus ‘MFI cut off’ for antibody positivity. Besides the overriding influence of anti-HLA antibodies on overall solid organ graft survival, immune response to non-HLA antigens has become a topic of substantial interest in recent years. An ever expanding list of non-HLA antigens has been implicated in graft rejection for various organs, of which the most noted are the Major Histocompatibility Complex class I chain-related molecule A (MICA), Vimentin, Myosin, Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), Tubulin and Collagen. MICA is one of the most polymorphic and extensively studied non-HLA antigenic targets especially in renal transplantation. Although there are clear indications of MICA antibodies being associated with adverse graft outcome, to date a definitive consensus on this relationship has not been agreed. Because MICA molecules are not expressed constitutively on immunocompetent cells such as T and B lymphocytes, it is of utmost importance to address the impact of MICA donor specific antibodies (DSA) as compared to those that are non- donor specific (NDSA) on graft outcome. The soluble isoform of MICA molecule (sMICA) that is derived from the proteolytic shedding of membrane bound molecules has the potential to engage the NK-cell activating receptor NKG2D and down-regulate its expression. Consequent to the interaction of NKG2D by sMICA, the receptor ligand complex is endocytosed and degraded and thus suppresses NKG2D mediated lysis of the target by NK cells. Thus interaction between NKG2D and sMICA leads to expansion of immunosuppressive/anergic T cells thereby resulting in suppression of NKG2D mediated host innate immunity. These concept support the possible involvement of an immunosuppressive role for sMICA during allotransplantation as shown recently for heart transplantation. This research topic focuses on the clinical utility of investigating the complete antibody repertoire in solid organ transplantation.

Antiphospholipid Antibodies and Syndrome

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ISBN: 9783038429470 9783038429487 Year: Pages: VIII, 128 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Microbiology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-05-18 16:21:48
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Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder caused by antiphospholipid antibodies. It was characterized by excessive clotting of blood and/or certain complications of pregnancy (premature miscarriages, unexplained fetal death, or premature birth) and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (such as anti-cardiolipin antibodies or lupus anticoagulant) in the blood. Fifty percent of people with lupus have APS. The exact pathogenesis of APS is inadequately understood, so no specific treatment is available.This Special Issue of Antibodies focuses on the symptoms, pathogenesis, diagnosis, clinical manifestation, therapy of APS, the new research development of antiphospholipid antibodies, and all the other aspects of APS.

HIV-Induced Damage of B Cells and Production of HIV Neutralizing Antibodies

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889454617 Year: Pages: 171 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-461-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Allergy and Immunology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-11-16 17:17:57
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Multiple dysfunctions take place in the B cell compartment during HIV-1 infection, comprising depletion of resting memory B cells carrying serological memory to vaccines and previously met pathogens. In addition, population of B cells characterized by the expression of exhaustion markers are enlarged during HIV-1 infection. Antibodies with the capacity to neutralize a broad range of HIV-1 isolates can be detected only in a minority of infected patients, after a year or more from acute infection. An open question is whether the inability of producing neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies is somehow linked to the B cell immunopathology observed in patients. In this research topic we invited scientists to summarize the current state of knowledge on regulation and development of B cells and antibody responses during HIV-1 infection; fifteen contributions were received comprising both reviews and original articles. The articles are related to B cell dysfunctions identified in HIV-1 infected individuals, production of different types of antibodies (neutralizing versus non neutralizing, and of different isotypes) in vivo during HIV-1 infection and the biological factors which may impact on this process, clinical potential and applications of anti-HIV antibodies and how to achieve neutralizing antibody responses to HIV-1 epitopes upon vaccination. The topic has gathered articles on front-line research undertaken in the field of B cells and antibodies in HIV-1 infection. It is our hope that the collection of articles presented in this book may be useful for new and experienced scholars in the field and add a piece to the complex puzzle of knowledge needed for the development of an HIV-1 vaccine.

Neuro-Immune Interactions in Inflammation and Autoimmunity

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889455331 Year: Pages: 222 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-533-1 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Allergy and Immunology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:42
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The nervous system plays an important role in the regulation of immunity and inflammation. On the other hand unbalanced immune responses in inflammatory and autoimmune conditions may have a deleterious impact on neuronal integrity and brain function.Recent studies have characterized neural pathways communicating peripheral inflammatory signals to the CNS, and brain- and spinal cord-derived circuitries controlling various innate and adaptive immune responses and inflammation. A prototypical neural reflex circuit that regulates immunity and inflammation is the vagus nerve-based “inflammatory reflex”. Ongoing research has revealed cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these neural circuits and indicated new therapeutic approaches in inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. Pharmacological and bioelectronic modulation of neural circuitry has been successfully explored in preclinical settings of sepsis, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, obesity-driven disorders, diabetes and other diseases. These studies paved the way to successful clinical trials with bioelectronic neuronal modulation in rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease.Dysregulated release of cytokines and other inflammatory molecules may have a severe impact on brain function. Brain inflammation (neuroinflammation), imbalances in brain neuronal integrity and neurotransmitter systems, and cognitive impairment are characteristic features of post-operative conditions, sepsis, liver diseases, diabetes and other disorders characterized by immune and metabolic dysregulation. Derangements in cytokine release also play a pivotal role in depression. Characteristic brain reactive antibodies in autoimmune conditions, including systemic lupus erythematosus and neuromyelitis optica, significantly contribute to brain pathology and cognitive impairment. These studies, and the simultaneous characterization of neuro-protective cytokines, identified new therapeutic approaches for treating neurological complications in inflammatory and autoimmune disorders.This Frontiers Research Topic is a forum for publishing research findings and methodological and conceptual advances at the intersection of immunology and neuroscience. We hope that presenting new insight into bi-directional neuro-immune communication in inflammation and autoimmunity will foster further collaborations and facilitate the development of new efficient therapeutic strategies.

Paradigm changes are required in HIV vaccine research

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889197279 Year: Pages: 74 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-727-9 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-04-07 11:22:02
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In his 1962 book "The Structure of Scientific Revolutions", Thomas Kuhn famously argued that researchers in every field of scientific enquiry always operate under a set of presuppositions known as paradigms that are rarely explicitly stated. In the field of HIV vaccine research, several prevailing paradigms led scientists for many years to pursue unfruitful lines of investigations that impeded significant progress. The uncritical acceptance of reigning paradigms makes scientists reluctant to abandon their mistaken assumptions even when they obtain results that are not consistent with the paradigms. The following five paradigms which disregard the degeneracy of the immune system were particularly harmful. 1) There is a primary and intrinsic epitope specific for each B cell receptor and for the corresponding monoclonal antibody.In reality, there is no single, intrinsic or "real" epitope for any antibody but only a diverse group of potential ligands. 2) Reactions with monoclonal antibodies are more specific than the combined reactivity of polyclonal antibodies. In reality, a polyclonal antiserum has greater specificity for a multiepitopic protein because different antibodies in the antiserum recognize separate epitopes on the same protein, giving rise to an additive specificity effect. By focusing vaccine design on single epitope-Mab pairs, the beneficial neutralizing synergy that occurs with polyclonal antibody responses is overlooked. 3) The HIV epitope identified by solving the crystallographic structure of a broadly neutralizing Mab – HIV Env complex should be able, when used as immunogen, to elicit antibodies endowed with the same neutralizing capacity as the Mab. Since every anti HIV bnMab is polyspecific, the single epitope identified in the complex is not necessarily the one that elicited the bnMab. Since hypermutated Mabs used in crystallographic studies differ from their germline-like receptor version present before somatic hypermutation, the identified epitope will not be an effective vaccine immunogen. 4) Effective vaccine immunogenicity can be predicted from the antigenic binding capacity of viral epitopes. Most fragments of a viral antigen can induce antibodies that react with the immunogen, but this is irrelevant for vaccination since these antibodies rarely recognize the cognate, intact antigen and even more rarely neutralize the infectivity of the viral pathogen that harbors the antigen. 5) The rational design of vaccine immunogens using reverse vaccinology is superior to the trial-and-error screening of vaccine candidates able to induce protective immunity. One epitope can be designed to increase its structural complementarity to one particular bnMab, but such antigen design is only masquerading as immunogen design because it is assumed that antigenic reactivity necessarily entails the immunogenic capacity to elicit neutralizing antibodies. When HIV Env epitopes, engineered to react with a bnMab are used to select from human donors rare memory B cells secreting bnAbs, this represents antigen design and not immunogen design. The aim of this Research Topic is to replace previous misleading paradigms by novel ones that better fit our current understanding of immunological specificity and will help HIV vaccine development.

Protective Immune Response to Dengue Virus Infection and Vaccines: perspectives from the field to the bench

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889195114 Year: Pages: 97 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-511-4 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-03 13:02:24
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Dengue is the most important mosquito-transmitted viral disease in humans. Half of the world population is at risk of infection, mostly in tropical and sub-tropical areas. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 50 to 100 million infections occur yearly, with 50,000 to 100,000 deaths related to dengue, mainly in children. Recent estimates show higher numbers, up to three times more, with 390 million estimated dengue infections per year, among which 96 million apparent infections (Bhatt et al. 2013). Initially localized to South-East Asia, dengue virus (DENV) started its spread in Latin America in the 80s. Little is known about DENV spread in Africa, but multiple seroprevalence surveys over several years are now clearly showing endemic areas in East and West Africa (Brady et al. 2013). Finally, due to global warming and intense traveling there is a risk of global spread towards more temperate regions, and both US Key islands (FL) and southern Europe recently faced DENV outbreaks. There are currently no specific treatments or vaccines available. Even though several dengue vaccines are in the pipeline, clear correlates of protection are still lacking. The recent failure of the live-attenuated Sanofi vaccine Phase 2b trial (Sabchareon et al. 2013) and the lack of correlation between clinical protection and in vitro neutralization assays, clearly underlines the necessity to better understand the role of the different components of the immune system in protection against dengue virus infection and the requirement for the development of additional and/or improved predictive assays. The aim of this research topic is to provide novel data, opinions and literature reviews on the best immune correlates of protection and recent advances in the immune response to DENV infection that can allow rapid progress of dengue vaccines. Authors can choose to submit original research papers, reviews or opinions on pre-clinical or clinical observations that will help unify the field, with perspectives from epidemiology, virology, immunology and vaccine developers. This research topic will discuss different aspects of the protective immune response to DENV that can influence vaccine development. It will include a review of epidemiological data generated in the field, which will address spatio-temporal diversity of DENV epidemics, the importance of cross-reactive protection and of the time-interval between infections as a predictor of disease. It will further include a review of the role of both the innate and adaptive immunity in DENV infection control, and discuss the usefulness of new improved animal models in dissecting the role of each immunological compartment, which will help define new correlate of immune protection. New data concerning the DENV structure and anti-dengue antibody structure will address the necessity of improved neutralization assays. The ultimate test to prove vaccine efficacy and study immune correlates of protection in humans before large trials will open up the discussion on human DENV challenges using controlled attenuated viral strains. Finally, the role of vaccines, administered in flavi-immune populations, in the modification of future epidemics will also be approached and will include novel studies on mosquitoes infection thresholds.

The Evolution and Development of the Antibody Repertoire

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889195497 Year: Pages: 122 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-549-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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Although at first glance mechanisms used to create the variable domains of immunoglobulin appear to be designed to generate diversity at random, closer inspection reveals striking evolutionary constraints on the sequence and structure of these antigen receptors, suggesting that natural selection is operating to create a repertoire that anticipates or is biased towards recognition of specific antigenic properties. This Research Topics issue will be devoted to an examination of the evolution of antigen receptor sequence at the germline level, an evaluation of the repertoire in B cells from fish, pigs and human, an introduction into bioinformatics approaches to the evaluation and analysis of the repertoire as ascertained by high throughput sequencing, and a discussion of how study of the normal repertoire informs the construction or selection of in vitro antibodies for applied purposes.

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