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Mathematical and Statistics Anxiety: Educational, Social, Developmental and Cognitive Perspectives

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889450763 Year: Pages: 194 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-076-3 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Psychology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-07-06 13:27:36
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Mathematical anxiety is a feeling of tension, apprehension or fear which arises when a person is faced with mathematical content. The negative consequences of mathematical anxiety are well-documented. Students with high levels of mathematical anxiety might underperform in important test situations, they tend to hold negative attitudes towards mathematics, and they are likely to opt out of elective mathematics courses, which also affects their career opportunities. Although at the university level many students do not continue to study mathematics, social science students are confronted with the fact that their disciplines involve learning about statistics - another potential source of anxiety for students who are uncomfortable with dealing with numerical content. Research on mathematical anxiety is a truly interdisciplinary field with contributions from educational, developmental, cognitive, social and neuroscience researchers. The current collection of papers demonstrates the diversity of the field, offering both new empirical contributions and reviews of existing studies. The contributors also outline future directions for this line of research.

New frontiers in the neuropsychopharmacology of mental illness

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889194049 Year: Pages: 254 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-404-9 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Therapeutics --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-10 11:59:06
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In recent years, mental illnesses have become recognized as a huge emotional and financial burden to the individual, their relatives and society at large. Stress-related and mood disorders as well as psychoactive substance abuse are among the disorders associated with most disability in high income countries. Suicide, which is often attributed to some underlying mental disorders, is a leading cause of death among teenagers and young adults. At the same time, mental disorders pose some of the toughest challenges in neuroscience research. There are many different categories of mental disorder as defined and classified by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) and the International Statistical Classification of Diseases 10th Revision (ICD-10). Despite the ongoing improvements of those widely used manuals, the validity and reliability of their diagnoses remain a constant debate. However, it has now become accepted by the scientific community that mental disorders can arise from multiple sources. In that regard, both clinical and animal studies looking at gene-environment interactions have helped to better understand the mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology as well as the discovery of treatments for mental disorders. This Research Topic aims to cover recent progress in research studying how genetic make-up and environmental factors (such as stress paradigm or pharmacological treatment) can contribute to the development of mental disorders such as anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia. This Research Topic also seeks to highlight studies looking at affective-like disorders following the intake of drugs of abuse. We also welcome all research articles, review papers, brief communications, and commentary on topics related to the broad field of Neuropsychopharmacology.

Histamine in the Brain

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889194346 Year: Pages: 99 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-434-6 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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Brain aminergic pathways are organized in parallel and interacting systems, which support a range of functions, from homoeostatic regulations to cognitive, and motivational processes. Despite overlapping functional influences, dopamine, serotonin, noradrenaline and histamine systems provide different contributions to these processes. The histaminergic system, long ignored as a major regulator of the sleep-wake cycle, has now been fully acknowledged also as a major coordinator of attention, learning and memory, decision making. Although histaminergic neurons project widely to the whole brain, they are functionally heterogeneous, a feature which may provide the substrate for differential regulation, in a region-specific manner, of other neurotransmitter systems. Neurochemical preclinical studies have clearly shown that histamine interacts and modulates the release of neurotransmitters that are recognized as major modulators of cognitive processing and motivated behaviours. As a consequence, the histamine system has been proposed as a therapeutic target to treat sleep-wake disorders and cognitive dysfunctions that accompany neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory pathologies. Last decades have witnessed an unexpected explosion of interest in brain histamine system, as new receptors have been discovered and selective ligands synthesised. Nevertheless, the complete picture of the histamine systems fine-tuning and its orchestration with other pathways remains rather elusive. This Research Topic is intended to offer an inter-disciplinary forum that will improve our current understanding of the role of brain histamine and provide the fundamentals necessary to drive innovation in clinical practice and to improve the management and treatment of neurological disorders.

How Fear and Stress Shape the Mind

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889198719 Year: Pages: 108 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-871-9 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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The experience of fear and stress leaves an indelible trace on the brain. This indelible trace is observed as both changes in behavior and changes in neuronal structure and function. Fear and stress interact on many levels. The experience of stress may lead to the formation of a fearful memory trace of a place or reminder cue, and fearful memory formation is regulated by the extent of concurrent stress. The concurrent experience of fear and stress may amplify fear and slow fear extinction which may lead to pathology. Fear memory formation involves changes in synaptic plasticity while stress and glucocorticoids change neuronal structure. Thus, both neurons and synapses are changed. These changes can be identified, visualised and mapped within focused microcircuits. In this Research Topic we focus on current advances in both the neurobiology and behavioral consequences of fear and stress.

Insomnia and beyond - Exploring the therapeutic potential of orexin receptor antagonists

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889193301 Year: Pages: 219 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-330-1 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Psychiatry --- Therapeutics --- Neurology --- Medicine (General) --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-03-10 08:14:32
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Orexin/hypocretin neuropeptides, produced by a few thousand neurons in the lateral hypothalamus, are of critical importance for the control of vigilance and arousal of vertebrates, from fish to amphibians, birds and mammals. Two orexin peptides, called orexin-A and orexin-B, exist in mammals. They bind with different affinities to two distinct, widely distributed, excitatory G-protein- coupled receptors, orexin receptor type 1 and type 2 (OXR-1/2). The discovery of an OXR mutation causing canine narcolepsy, the narcolepsy-like phenotype of orexin peptide knockout mice, and the orexin neuron loss associated with human narcoleptic patients laid the foundation for the discovery of small molecule OXR antagonists as novel treatments for sleep disorders. Proof of concept studies from Glaxo Smith Kline, Actelion Pharmaceuticals Ltd. and Merck have now consistently demonstrated the efficacy of dual OXR antagonists (DORAs) in promoting sleep in rodents, dogs, non-human primates and humans. Some of these antagonists have completed late stage clinical testing in primary insomnia. Orexin drug discovery programs have also been initiated by other large pharmaceutical companies including Hoffmann La Roche, Novartis, Eli Lilly and Johnson & Johnson. Orexins are increasingly recognized for orchestrating the activity of the organism’s arousal system with appetite, reward and stress processing pathways. Therefore, in addition to models of insomnia, pharmacological effects of DORAs have begun to be investigated in rodent models of addiction, depression and anxiety. The first clinical trials in diabetic neuropathy, migraine and depression have been initiated with Merck’s MK-6096 (www.clinicaltrials.gov). Whereas the pharmacology of DORAs is established for their effects on wakefulness, pharmacological effects of selective OXR-1 or OXR-2 antagonists (SORAs) have remained less clear. From an evolutionary point of view, the OXR-2 was expressed first in most vertebrate lineages, whereas the OXR-1 is believed to result from a gene duplication event, when mammals emerged. Yet, both receptors do not have redundant function. Their brain expression pattern, their intracellular signaling, as well as their affinity for orexin-A and orexin-B differs. During the past decade most preclinical research on selective OXR-1 antagonism was performed with SB-334867. Only in recent years, other selective OXR-1 and OXR-2 antagonists with optimized selectivity profiles and pharmacokinetic properties have been discovered, and phenotypes of OXR-1 and OXR-2 knockout mice were described. The present Research Topic (referred to in the Editorial as “special topics issue”) comprises submissions of original research manuscripts as well as reviews, directed towards the neuropharmacology of OXR antagonists. The submissions are preclinical papers dealing with dual and/or selective OXR antagonists that shed light on the differential contribution of endogenous orexin signaling through both OXRs for cellular, physiological and behavioral processes. Some manuscripts also report on convergence or divergence of DORA vs. SORA effects with phenotypes expressed by OXR-1 or OXR-2 knockout animals. Ultimately these findings may help further define the potential of DORAs and SORAs in particular therapeutic areas in insomnia and beyond insomnia.

Biased Cognitions & Social Anxiety: Building a Global Framework for Integrating Cognitive, Behavioral, and Neural Processes

Authors: --- --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889194230 Year: Pages: 98 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-423-0 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Neurology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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Social anxiety (SA) is a common and incapacitating disorder that has been associated with seriously impaired career, academic, and general social functioning. Regarding epidemiological data, SA has a lifetime prevalence of 12.1% and is the fourth most common psychopathological disorder (Kessler et al., 2005). At a fundamental point of view, the most prominent cognitive models of SA posit that biased cognitions contribute to the development and maintenance of the disorder (e.g., Clark & Wells, 1995; Rapee & Heimberg, 1997). Over the last decades, a large body of research has provided evidence that individuals suffering from SA exhibit such biased cognitions at the level of visual attention, memory of social encounters, interpretation of social events, and in judgment of social cues. Such biased cognitions in SA has been studied in different ways within cognitive psychology, behavioral psychology, clinical psychology, and cognitive neuroscience over the last few decades, yet, integrative approaches for channeling all information into a unified account of biased cognitions in SA has not been presented so far. The present Research Topic aims to bring together theses different ways, and to highlight findings and methods which can unify research across these areas. In particular, this Research Topic aims to advance the current theoretical models of SA and set the stage for future developments of the field by clarifying and linking theoretical concepts across disciplines.

Clearing the smokescreen: The current evidence on cannabis use

Authors: --- --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889195275 Year: Pages: 171 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-527-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Psychiatry --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-10 11:59:06
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Cannabis remains the most commonly used illicit substance world-wide, with international estimates indicating that 2.8%-4.5% of the global population use cannabis each year. This prevalence rate has not changed substantially in the past decade and there is no indication that it will do so in the next decade. In line with this, many prominent organizations and individuals have acknowledged that the “war on drugs” has failed and are now calling for a rethink on drug-related policy and legal frameworks. With a growing number of jurisdictions across the world heeding this call and introducing legislation to decriminalize or legalize cannabis use, it is essential that any changes to legal frameworks and public health policies are based on the best available scientific evidence. To facilitate the adoption of an evidence-based approach to cannabis policy, the aim of this Research Topic was to gather a comprehensive body of research to clarify the current state of evidence relating to cannabis use. Of interest were articles addressing the following questions: • How do we study cannabis use? (e.g., recruitment; measuring dose/use; assessing dependence/problematic use; confounding; translation of findings from animal studies) • What do we know about cannabis use? (e.g., patterns, contexts, methods of use) • What do we know about people who use cannabis? (e.g., who uses cannabis and why) • What are the social settings, norms and cultural values that go along with cannabis use? • How is problematic cannabis use, as opposed to mere use, defined, judged and constructed in different societies? • What do we know about the effects/outcomes of cannabis use? (e.g., acute, short- and long-term; harms/ benefits) • What do we know about the factors associated with the initiation, continuance and cessation of cannabis use? • What do we know about the medicinal use of cannabis? (e.g., who uses medicinally and why; efficacy/effectiveness in different clinical populations; comparison with other medications) • What do we know about treatment for people who engage in problematic cannabis use? (e.g., who seeks/is referred to treatment and why; efficacy and effectiveness) • What do we know about cannabis? (e.g., pharmacodynamics/pharmacokinetics of different strains, cultivation, preparation and consumption methods) • How do policy and legal frameworks impact on the people who use cannabis? • What is the future for cannabis research? (e.g., potential avenues for future research; aspects needing more attention; innovative approaches; political/funding issues affecting cannabis research)

A History of Male Psychological Disorders in Britain, 1945–1980

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ISBN: 9781137448873 Year: Pages: 215 DOI: 10.1057/9781137448880 Language: English
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Grant: Wellcome Trust - 91661
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-08 11:01:20
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Statistically, women appear to suffer more frequently from depressive and anxiety disorders, featuring more regularly in primary care figures for consultations, diagnoses and prescriptions for psychotropic medication. This has been consistently so throughout the post-war period with current figures suggesting that women are approximately twice more likely to suffer from affective disorders than men. However, this book suggests that the statistical landscape reveals only part of the story. Currently, 75 per cent of suicides are among men, and this trend can also be traced back historically to data that suggests this has been the case since the beginning of the twentieth-century. This book suggests that male psychological illness was in fact no less common, but that it emerged in complex ways and was understood differently in response to prevailing cultural and medical forces. The book explores a host of medical, cultural and social factors that raise important questions about historical and current perceptions of gender and mental illness.

Avoidance: From Basic Science to Psychopathology

Authors: --- --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889198283 Year: Pages: 227 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-828-3 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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Coping has a myriad of facets: knowledge concerning the circumstances of threats to emotional and physical well being, the ability to meet immediate needs to mitigate, the potential for recurrence, the ability to apply efforts and resources to manage recurrence, and the complex assessment of competing motivations and changing circumstances. Successful coping is measured in the efficiency of efforts in balance with the degree of threat and likelihood of future occurrence. As one means of coping, avoidance encompass thoughts and efforts toward prevention of future aversive experiences and events. Anxiety disorders exemplify an extreme bias toward avoidance. A diathesis learning model focuses research efforts on individual vulnerabilities to acquire and express avoidance, the neurobiology of avoidance learning and its attendant circuitry. A fundamental understanding of avoidance through a diathesis learning model offers will facilitate the development of effective treatment protocols in alleviating anxiety disorders.

Progress in Physical activity and Exercise and Affective and Anxiety Disorders: Translational Studies, Perspectives and Future Directions

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889194711 Year: Pages: 78 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-471-1 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Psychiatry --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-03-10 08:14:33
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Physical activity and exercise were receiving a great attention as a strategy of prevention and treatment of affective and some anxiety disorders. Many studies have showed the efficacy of exercise in major depression and at depressed episode of bipolar patients, as well as, some authors shows the benefits of exercise in some anxiety disorders like Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Panic. Despite their efficacy, little is known concerning the main mechanisms related to the antidepressant and anxiolytic effects of exercise. Several studies in an animal model using Neurotrophic Factors, Oxidative Stress, Immunologic response and other biological markers reveal promising results. However, few studies were conducted in clinical samples. Additional to the antidepressant and anxiolytic effects, exercise appears improve QoL in major depressed, bipolar and anxiety patients. Theoretically, this increase may be associated with cognitive improvements, improvements at sleep quality, physical functioning, as well as other psychological issues as self-esteem, self-concept, and general well-being. The propose of this topic is to address the novelty and most recent research, related to antidepressant and anxiolytic effects of physical activity and exercise in patients with affective and anxiety disorders, as well as the issues associated with QoL improvement.The topic is looking for: – Clinical trials using exercise and physical activity as a treatment affective and anxiety disorders. – Studies investigating the optimal prescription factors (dose, volume, intensity, setting, frequency) associated with antidepressant and anxiolytic effects of physical activity and exercise for affective and anxiety disorder patients. – Original studies, comprehensive reviews, hypothesis and opinions concerning the mechanisms of antidepressant and anxiolytic effects of physical activity and exercise in affective and anxiety disorder patients. – Original studies, comprehensive reviews, hypothesis and opinions concerning other benefits of physical activity and exercise like : cognition, weight gain prevention and QoL in affective and anxiety disorder patients. – Translational research. – Studies of cost-efficacy analysis

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