Search results: Found 20

Listing 1 - 10 of 20 << page
of 2
>>
Sort by
Searching for Immune Tolerance Manipulating New Molecules and Exploiting New Concepts on Lymphocyte Biology

Authors: --- --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889199518 Year: Pages: 143 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-951-8 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Allergy and Immunology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The break on immune tolerance is a common point between autoimmune diseases and the uncontrolled effector immune responses against allo-antigens in transplantation. Among the past years, several approaches to restore a suppressive immune state have included the targeting of co-stimulatory/inhibitory molecules on immune cells, the promotion or blockade of pivotal cytokines, and the extensive study on how to isolate and expand suppressive cells with the purpose to re-infuse them in patients. To date, the availability of new technologies has permitted to learn, in a more detailed way, the immune mechanisms carried out by suppressive lymphocytes, together with the identification of new potential candidates to target in our quest for immune tolerance. For example, the attractive concepts of lymphocyte plasticity and function stability, supported by the finding of new transcription factors, have opened a new window in the understanding of T cell differentiation, effector cell commitment and immune regulatory function. On the other hand, the discovery of new members of the Ig superfamily ligand, VISTA; the intriguing role of modulatory molecules like Retinoic Acid, Neuropilin-1, Fc gamma receptors, or cytokines such as IL-33, among others, are revealing new possibilities in the development of new strategies to conquer our obsession: immune tolerance. Here, we gather the latest information regarding new targets and cellular processes, including an update on current cellular therapies and the exciting coming approaches to cure autoimmunity and permit transplant acceptance.

Dendritic Cell Control of Immune Responses

Authors: ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889198689 Year: Pages: 121 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-868-9 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Dendritic cells (DC) are among the first cells to encounter pathogens and damage in peripheral tissues and, upon activation, DC migrate to lymph nodes where they activate and educate T cells to initiate and shape the immune response. DC present pathogen-derived antigen to T cells and drive T cell differentiation into particular effector cells through the expression and secretion of co-stimulatory molecules and cytokines respectively. The study of DC biology has included the identification of multiple DC subsets in tissues and lymphoid organs, the differentiation and plasticity of DC subsets, the functional consequences of DC interaction with pathogen, control of DC migratory properties and the impact of DC on T cell activation and differentiation. In recent years sophisticated systems biology approaches have been developed to deepen our understanding of DC function. These studies have identified differences between DC subsets located in various tissues and critical factors that drive the outcome of the interaction between DC and T cells. DC are currently being used in in various clinical therapeutic settings, including as vaccines for cancer and autoimmune disease. A clear understanding of DC factors that contribute to specific immune responses is vital to the success of DC based therapies. This research topic will give a comprehensive overview of current issues in DC biology and provides an update on the clinical uses of DC in the therapy of autoimmunity and cancer.

Interaction Between Hyaluronic Acid and Its Receptors (CD44, RHAMM) Regulates the Activity of Inflammation and Cancer

Author:
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889199136 Year: Pages: 218 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-913-6 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Allergy and Immunology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The biological outcome of Hyaluronan (also hyaluronic acid, abbreviated HA) interaction with its CD44 or RHAMM receptors recently attracted much attention within the scientific community owing to a Nature article by Tian X et al. (Nature 2013; 499:346-9). The article described a life span exceeding 30 years in naked mole rats, whereas the maximal lifespan of mice, to which the naked mole rat is related, is only 4 years. This observation is accompanied by the finding that the naked mole rat, in contrast to the mouse, does not develop spontaneous tumors during this exceptional longevity. The article provides evidence that interaction of long tissue HA (6000-12,000 kDa) of the naked mole rat with cell surface CD44, in contrast to the interaction of short tissue HA (less than 3000 kDa) with the mouse CD44, makes the difference. More specifically, this communication shows that the interaction of short HA with fibroblasts’ CD44 imposes on them susceptibility for malignant transformation, whereas the corresponding interaction with long HA imposes on the fibroblasts a resistance to malignant transformation. The article does not explain the mechanism that underlines these findings. However, the articles, that will be published in the proposed Research Topic in the Inflammation section of Frontiers in Immunology, can bridge not only this gap, but also may explain why interaction between short HA and cell surface CD44 (or RHAMM, an additional HA receptor) enhances the development of inflammatory and malignant diseases. Furthermore, the articles included in the proposed Frontiers Research Topic will show that cancer cells and inflammatory cells share several properties related to the interaction between short HA and cell surface CD44 and/or RHAMM. These shared properties include: 1. Support of cell migration, which allows tumor metastasis and accumulation of inflammatory cells at the inflammation site; 2. Delivery of intracellular signaling, which leads to cell survival of either cancer cells or inflammatory cells; 3. Delivery of intracellular signaling, which activates cell replication and population expansion of either cancer cells or inflammatory cells; and 4. Binding of growth factors to cell surface CD44 of cancer cells or inflammatory cells (i.e., the growth factors) and their presentation to cells with cognate receptors (endothelial cells, fibroblasts), leading to pro-malignant or pro-inflammatory activities. Going back to the naked mole rat story, we may conclude from the proposed articles of this Frontiers Research Topic that the long HA, which displays anti-malignant effect, interferes with the above described pro-malignant potential of the short HA (perhaps by competing on the same CD44 receptor). Extrapolating this concept to Inflammation, the same mechanism (competition?) may be valid for inflammatory (and autoimmune) activities. If this is the case, long HA may be used for therapy of both malignant and inflammatory diseases. Moreover, targeting the interaction between short HA and CD44 (e.g. by anti-CD44 blocking antibodies) may display also a therapeutic effect on both malignant and inflammatory diseases, an issue that encourages not only fruitful exchange of views, but also practical experimental collaboration.

The immunology of cellular stress proteins

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889193257 Year: Pages: 89 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-325-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-03-10 08:14:32
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Stress proteins or heat-shock proteins (HSP) are evolutionary conserved proteins present in every prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell. Their main function is to protect cells and proteins from damage under stressful circumstances. The latter circumstances do include the cell and protein damaging effects of inflammation. The discovery of mycobacterial HSP60 being a critical antigen in the model of adjuvant arthritis, has led to studies that showed the immuno-dominance of microbial HSP60 and the potential of the microbial HSP induced repertoire of antibodies and T cells to cross-recognize the self-HSP homologues of stressed cells. Since then, the research in the immunology of stress proteins started to comprise a widening spectrum of topics with potential medical relevance. Interestingly, since stress proteins have their activities in both innate and adaptive immunity, they are key elements in the cross-roads between both arms of the immune system. Stress proteins or HSP can be considered as functional 'biomarkers' of inflammation. They are up-regulated locally during inflammation and interestingly, they seem to function as targets for anti-inflammatory regulatory T cells. In experimental models of autoimmunity, mainly arthritis, administration of HSP peptides have been shown to suppress disease. First clinical trials have shown the anti-inflammatory nature of T cell responses to Hsp. In type I diabetes and in rheumatoid arthritis, parenteral and oral administration of Hsp peptides were shown to induce a bias in pro-inflammatory T cells, switching them in the direction of regulatory cytokine production (IL4, IL5 and IL10). In addition a raised level of a marker of natural T regulatory cells, the transcription factor FoxP3, was noted in the RA trial. Other inflammatory diseases or diseases with inflammatory components which feature the immune imprint of the up-regulated Hsp are atherosclerosis, inflammatory bowel diseases, multiple sclerosis and atopic diseases such atopic dermatitis and allergic asthma.

Chronic inflammation in conditions associated with a deficient clearance of dying and dead cells, their remnants, and intracellular constituents

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889196012 Year: Pages: 73 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-601-2 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Allergy and Immunology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-08-16 10:34:25
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

In multicellular organisms, states with a high degree of tissue turnover like embryogenesis, development, and adult tissue homeostasis need an instantaneous, tightly regulated and immunologically silent clearance of these dying cells to ensure appropriate development of the embryo and adult tissue remodelling. The proper and swift clearance of apoptotic cells is essential to prevent cellular leakage of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) which would lead to the stimulation of inflammatory cytokine responses. In addition to the clearance of apoptotic cells (efferocytosis), backup mechanisms are required to cope with DAMPs (HMGB-1, DNA, RNA, S100 molecules, ATP and adenosine) and other intracellular material (uric acid, intracellular proteins and their aggregates) released from cells, that were not properly cleared and have entered the stage of secondary necrosis. Furthermore, under certain pathologic conditions (e.g. gout, cancer, diabetes) non-apoptotic cell death may transiently occur (NETosis, necroptosis, pyroptosis) which generates material that also has to be cleared to avoid overloading tissues with non-functional cellular waste. Efficient efferocytosis is therefore indispensable for normal tissue turnover and homeostasis. The characterization of various signalling pathways that regulate this complex and evolutionary conserved process has shed light on new pathogenetic mechanisms of many diseases. Impaired clearance promotes initiation of autoimmunity as well as the perpetuation of chronic inflammation, but may also foster anti-tumor immunity under certain microenvironmental conditions. Immunological tolerance is continuously being challenged by the presence of post-apoptotic remnants in peripheral lymphoid tissues. Besides the autoimmune phenotype of chronic inflammatory rheumatoid disorders a plethora of pathologies have been associated with defects in genes involved in clearance, e.g. atherosclerosis, cancer, gout, diabetes, some forms of blindness, neuropathy, schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. The main goal of this research topic is to collect contributions from various disciplines committed to studying pathogenetic mechanisms of the aforementioned disorders and dealing with alterations in the clearance of dying and dead cells, their remnants, and their constituents that leak out after membrane rupture. Integrating the combined collection of knowledge on efferocytosis and clearance of dead cells and their derived waste from different fields of research in physiology and pathophysiology could improve the molecular understanding of these increasingly prevalent diseases and may ultimately result in new therapeutic strategies.

Mysteries of Type I IFN response: benefits versus detriments

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889196296 Year: Pages: 74 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-629-6 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Allergy and Immunology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-08-16 10:34:25
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Successful containment of an infection is dependent on both innate and adaptive immune response. Cytokines are essential effectors of both of these systems. In particular, type I interferons (IFN-I) are important components of early innate immunity against an infection. However, the production of IFN-I could serve as a double edge sword, either containing an infection or enhancing susceptibility. For example, IFN-I, which is essential for early containment of viral infections, has been shown to be detrimental to the host during bacterial infections. In fact, recent significant reports have shown that influenza virus induced IFN-I responses can enhance the host susceptibility to secondary bacterial infections. These recent reports highlight the expanding immunoregulatory role of IFN-I in the host immunity. With these recent findings in mind, the aim of this research topic is to welcome novel data, opinion and literature reviews on the newly identified dual functions of IFN-I. This research topic wills focus on the following areas of IFN-I: 1) a detrimental role of IFN-I during primary bacterial infection; 2) a detrimental role of viral infection induced IFN-I during secondary bacterial infections; 3) evolutionary pressure that drove detrimental IFN-I response during primary bacterial infection; and 4) does benefit of IFN-I responses during primary viral infections outweigh the adverse consequences of IFN-I mediated enhanced susceptibility to secondary bacterial infections.

Neuro-Immune Interactions in Inflammation and Autoimmunity

Authors: ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889455331 Year: Pages: 222 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-533-1 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Allergy and Immunology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:42
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The nervous system plays an important role in the regulation of immunity and inflammation. On the other hand unbalanced immune responses in inflammatory and autoimmune conditions may have a deleterious impact on neuronal integrity and brain function.Recent studies have characterized neural pathways communicating peripheral inflammatory signals to the CNS, and brain- and spinal cord-derived circuitries controlling various innate and adaptive immune responses and inflammation. A prototypical neural reflex circuit that regulates immunity and inflammation is the vagus nerve-based “inflammatory reflex”. Ongoing research has revealed cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these neural circuits and indicated new therapeutic approaches in inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. Pharmacological and bioelectronic modulation of neural circuitry has been successfully explored in preclinical settings of sepsis, arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, obesity-driven disorders, diabetes and other diseases. These studies paved the way to successful clinical trials with bioelectronic neuronal modulation in rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease.Dysregulated release of cytokines and other inflammatory molecules may have a severe impact on brain function. Brain inflammation (neuroinflammation), imbalances in brain neuronal integrity and neurotransmitter systems, and cognitive impairment are characteristic features of post-operative conditions, sepsis, liver diseases, diabetes and other disorders characterized by immune and metabolic dysregulation. Derangements in cytokine release also play a pivotal role in depression. Characteristic brain reactive antibodies in autoimmune conditions, including systemic lupus erythematosus and neuromyelitis optica, significantly contribute to brain pathology and cognitive impairment. These studies, and the simultaneous characterization of neuro-protective cytokines, identified new therapeutic approaches for treating neurological complications in inflammatory and autoimmune disorders.This Frontiers Research Topic is a forum for publishing research findings and methodological and conceptual advances at the intersection of immunology and neuroscience. We hope that presenting new insight into bi-directional neuro-immune communication in inflammation and autoimmunity will foster further collaborations and facilitate the development of new efficient therapeutic strategies.

How aging affects T lymphocyte-mediated immunity

Author:
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889194186 Year: Pages: 77 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-418-6 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-10 11:59:06
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Increasing age has been associated with an insufficient protection following vaccination and an increased incidence and severity of infectious diseases. The predicted acceleration of global population aging will accentuate the need to understand the mechanisms that drive the age-related decline of the immune system and to, eventually, identify strategies to lower the burden of infectious diseases in elderly people. One type of immune cell appears to be most dramatically affected by the aging process: T lymphocytes. Age-related changes of the bone marrow and the thymus microenvironment lead to a decreased thymic output of functional, naïve T lymphocytes. As T lymphocytes are key players of the adaptive immune system, this research topic will summarize our current understanding on how aging affects the microenvironmental niches and molecular networks that are important for the generation, survival and function of naïve, memory and effector T lymphocytes. This research topic will also address the impact of aging on the different T lymphocyte lineages, such as regulatory T cells and Th17 cells and how age-related changes of the microenvironment affect organ- and tissue-resident memory T lymphocytes. Eventually, the identification of a set of markers for immunosenescence would facilitate the design and application of more specific therapies and improved vaccines and vaccination strategies for elderly people, thereby increasing life and health span.

Brain-immune interactions in health and disease

Authors: ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889195145 Year: Pages: 109 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-514-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Internal medicine --- Medicine (General) --- Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-10 11:59:06
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Brain-immune interactions are essential to maintain health and their dysfunction contributes to diverse human diseases. Recent data show that haematopoietic processes and immune organs are under central autonomic control. Deficient regulation of inflammatory events contributes to brain diseases, whereas acute or chronic brain injury is linked with the development of systemic inflammatory conditions or immunosuppression. At present, common disorders with high socio-economic burden such as cancer, cardiovascular-, neuroinflammatory- and neurodegenerative diseases, asthma, allergies, autism, psychiatric conditions and sepsis are believed to be influenced, at least in part, by the dysfunction of brain-immune communication. Since the median age of the world's population is increasing rapidly, it is expected that the burden of common non-communicable diseases will further increase, which represents a huge challenge to the health care systems worldwide. Thus, there is an increasing demand to understand and treat complex diseases, many of which are age-related, and this is not possible unless the fine-tuned communication between large systems -such as the nervous and the immune system- is comprehensively understood. Although it is impossible to cover all areas of relevant research in this field, papers in this eBook give some insight to a few important aspects of brain-immune interactions and their contribution to disease. We hope that this collection could stimulate further relevant research and facilitate discussions to support the understanding of the highly complex interactions between the immune system and the brain in health and disease.

The Origin of the Plasma Cell Heterogeneity

Authors: ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889197347 Year: Pages: 80 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-734-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-04-07 11:22:02
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Plasma cells (PCs) are terminally differentiated B-cells producing large amounts of immunoglobulins (Ig). In humans, most of circulating Ig are produced by bone marrow plasma cells. PCs differentiate from activated naïve or memory B-cells usually activated by specific antigens. It is still controversial whether the regulation of PCs numbers and the “active” in vivo Ig diversity depend or not on non-specific reactivation of B-cells during infections. Depending on the stimulus (T-independent/T-dependent antigen, cytokines, partner cells) and B-cell types (naïve or memory, circulating or germinal center, lymph nodes or spleen, B1 or B2...), both the phenotype and isotype of PCs differ suggesting that PC diversity is either linked to B-cell diversity or to the type of stimulus or to both. Knowledge of the mechanisms supporting PC diversity has important consequences for the management of i) plasma cell neoplasia such as Multiple Myeloma and Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia, ii) vaccine protection against pathogens and iii) auto-immune diseases.

Keywords

Plasma cell --- B-cell --- differentiation --- Cell Cycle --- IL21 --- Autophagy --- B1 --- Autoimmunity --- Myeloma

Listing 1 - 10 of 20 << page
of 2
>>
Sort by
Narrow your search

Publisher

Frontiers Media SA (19)

MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (1)


License

CC by (19)

CC by-nc-nd (1)


Language

english (19)

eng (1)


Year
From To Submit

2019 (1)

2018 (2)

2017 (6)

2016 (5)

2015 (5)

2014 (1)