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Intra- and inter-species interactions in microbial communities

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889194490 Year: Pages: 149 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-449-0 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Botany --- Microbiology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-02-05 17:24:33
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Recent developments in various “OMICs” fields have revolutionized our understanding of the vast diversity and ubiquity of microbes in the biosphere. However, most of the current paradigms of microbial cell biology, and our view of how microbes live and what they are capable of, are derived from in vitro experiments on isolated strains. Even the co-culturing of mixed species to interrogate community behavior is relatively new. But the majority of microorganisms lives in complex communities in natural environments, under varying conditions, and often cannot be cultivated. Unless we obtain a detailed understanding of the near-native 3D ultrastructure of individual community members, the 3D spatial community organization, their metabolic interdependences, coordinated gene expression and the spatial organization of their macromolecular machines inventories as well as their communication strategies, we won’t be able to truly understand microbial community life. How spatial and also temporal organization in cell–cell interactions are achieved remains largely elusive. For example, a key question in microbial ecology is what mechanisms microbes employ to respond when faced with prey, competitors or predators, and changes in external factors. Specifically, to what degree do bacterial cells in biofilms act individually or with coordinated responses? What are the spatial extent and coherence of coordinated responses? In addition, networks linking organisms across a dynamic range of physical constraints and connections should provide the basis for linked evolutionary changes under pressure from a changing environment. Therefore, we need to investigate microbial responses to altered or adverse environmental conditions (including phages, predators, and competitors) and their macromolecular, metabolic responses according to their spatial organization. We envision a diverse set of tools, including optical, spectroscopical, chemical and ultrastructural imaging techniques that will be utilized to address questions regarding e.g. intra- and inter-organism interactions linked to ultrastructure, and correlated adaptive responses in gene expression, physiological and metabolic states as a consequence of the alterations of their environment. Clearly strategies for co-evolution and in general the display of adaptive strategies of a microbial network as a response to the altered environment are of high interest. While a special focus will be placed on terrestrial sole-species or mixed biofilms, we are also interested in aquatic systems, biofilms in general and microbes living in symbiosis. In this Research Topic, we wish to summarize and review results investigating interactions and possibly networks between microbes of the same or different species, their co-occurrence, as well as spatiotemporal patterns of distribution. Our goal is to include a broad spectrum of experimental and theoretical contributions, from research and review articles to hypothesis and theory, aiming at understanding microbial interactions at a systems level.

Biofilms from a Food Microbiology Perspective: Structures, Functions and Control Strategies

Authors: ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889451081 Year: Pages: 197 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-108-1 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Microbiology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-07-06 13:27:36
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Materials and equipment in food processing industries are colonized by surface-associated microbial communities called biofilms. In these biostructures microorganisms are embedded in a complex organic matrix composed essentially of polysaccharides, nucleic acids and proteins. This organic shield contributes to the mechanical biofilm cohesion and triggers tolerance to environmental stresses such as dehydratation or nutrient deprivation. Notably, cells within a biofilm are more tolerant to sanitation processes and the action of antimicrobial agents than their free living (or planktonic) counterparts. Such properties make conventional cleaning and disinfection protocols normally not effective in eradicating these biocontaminants. Biofilms are thus a continuous source of persistent microorganisms, including spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms, leading to repeated contamination of processed food with important economic and safety impact. Alternatively, in some particular settings, biofilm formation by resident or technological microorganisms can be desirable, due to possible enhancement of food fermentations or as a means of bioprotection against the settlement of pathogenic microorganisms. In the last decades substantial research efforts have been devoted to unravelling mechanisms of biofilm formation, deciphering biofilm architecture and understanding microbial interactions within those ecosystems. However, biofilms present a high level of complexity and many aspects remain yet to be fully understood. A lot of attention has been also paid to the development of novel strategies for preventing or controlling biofilm formation in industrial settings. Further research needs to be focused on the identification of new biocides effective against biofilm-associated microorganisms, the development of control strategies based on the inhibition of cell-to-cell communication, and the potential use of bacteriocins, bacteriocin-producing bacteria, phage, and natural antimicrobials as anti-biofilm agents, among others. This Research Topic aims to provide an avenue for dissemination of recent advances within the “biofilms” field, from novel knowledge on mechanisms of biofilm formation and biofilm architecture to novel strategies for biofilm control in food industrial settings.

Antimicrobial Resistance and Virulence Common Mechanisms

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889451814 Year: Pages: 138 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-181-4 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Microbiology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-08-28 14:01:09
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Multiple relationships exist between antimicrobial resistance and bacterial virulence, and the spread of clones combining multiple antibiotic resistance and a high virulence level is an increasing problem. It was previously described how mutation-driven or horizontally acquired resistance mechanisms can also have effects on virulence. It was also reported that mobile genetic elements often carry both resistance determinants and virulence-modulating genes, which favors the co-selection of both traits. In the present volume, we present a collection of articles which document additional aspects of the interactions between antimicrobial resistance and virulence in bacteria, and describe their potential therapeutic consequences.

Biofilm-Based Nosocomial Infections

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ISBN: 9783038421351 9783038421368 Year: Pages: 238 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03842-136-8 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Added to DOAB on : 2016-05-12 12:14:31
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Microbial biofilms have been implicated in a large number of acute and chronic infections, as well as in the failure of antibiotic treatment, particularly in hospitalized patients. In fact, the well-known persistence in the nosocomial environment of multidrug resistant microorganisms is believed to be highly promoted by the ability of the great majority of the involved bacterial and fungal species to adhere on living or abiotic surfaces, and to grow in sessile mode, to form single- or multi-species biofilms. In these communities, microbes grow encased in a hydrated matrix of extracellular polymeric substances produced by themselves and are well protected from the host immune response and the attack of antimicrobial molecules. Thus, the establishment of microbial biofilm communities on the mucosal and soft tissues of hospitalized patients, as well as on the surfaces of indwelling devices and medical instruments, is expected to have a great influence on the success of the antibiotic therapies against most of the bugs involved in nosocomial infections, being biofilm-growing bacteria and fungi much less susceptible to antibiotics.

Archaeal Cell Envelope and Surface Structures

Authors: ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889197736 Year: Pages: 178 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-773-6 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Microbiology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-04-07 11:22:02
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Prokaryotes have a complex cell envelope which has several important functions, including providing a barrier that protects the cytoplasm from the environment. Along with its associated proteinaceous structures, it also ensures cell stability, facilitates motility, mediates adherence to biotic and abiotic surfaces, and facilitates communication with the extracellular environment. Viruses have evolved to take advantage of cell envelope constituents to gain access to the cellular interior as well as for egress from the cell. While many aspects of the biosynthesis and structure of the cell envelope are similar across domains, archaeal cell envelopes have several unique characteristics including, among others, an isoprenoid lipid bilayer, a non-murein-based cell wall, and a unique motility structure, (important features that give archaeal cell envelopes characteristics that are significantly different from those of bacterial cell envelopes – possibly out). Recent analyses have revealed that the cell envelopes of distantly related archaea also display an immense diversity of characteristics. For instance, while many archaea have an S-layer, the subunits of S-layers of various archaeal species, as well as their posttranslational modifications, vary significantly. Moreover, like gram-negative bacteria, recent studies have shown that some archaeal species also have an outer membrane. In this collection of articles, we include contributions that focus on research that has expanded our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the biogenesis and functions of archaeal cell envelopes and their constituent surface structures.

Keywords

pili --- Flagella --- archaella --- Archaea --- S-layer --- Cytochromes --- membrane --- hami --- Biofilms --- Surface structures

Phage Therapy: Past; Present and Future

Authors: --- --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889452514 Year: Pages: 392 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-251-4 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Microbiology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-02-27 16:16:44
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Historically, the first observation of a transmissible lytic agent that is specifically active against a bacterium (Bacillus anthracis) was by a Russian microbiologist Nikolay Gamaleya in 1898. At that time, however, it was too early to make a connection to another discovery made by Dmitri Ivanovsky in 1892 and Martinus Beijerinck in 1898 on a non-bacterial pathogen infecting tobacco plants. Thus the viral world was discovered in two of the three domains of life, and our current understanding is that viruses represent the most abundant biological entities on the planet. The potential of bacteriophages for infection treatment have been recognized after the discoveries by Frederick Twort and Felix d’Hérelle in 1915 and 1917. Subsequent phage therapy developments, however, have been overshadowed by the remarkable success of antibiotics in infection control and treatment, and phage therapy research and development persisted mostly in the former Soviet Union countries, Russia and Georgia, as well as in France and Poland. The dramatic rise of antibiotic resistance and especially of multi-drug resistance among human and animal bacterial pathogens, however, challenged the position of antibiotics as a single most important pillar for infection control and treatment. Thus there is a renewed interest in phage therapy as a possible additive/alternative therapy, especially for the infections that resist routine antibiotic treatment. The basis for the revival of phage therapy is affected by a number of issues that need to be resolved before it can enter the arena, which is traditionally reserved for antibiotics. Probably the most important is the regulatory issue: How should phage therapy be regulated? Similarly to drugs? Then the co-evolving nature of phage-bacterial host relationship will be a major hurdle for the production of consistent phage formulae. Or should we resort to the phage products such as lysins and the corresponding engineered versions in order to have accurate and consistent delivery doses? We still have very limited knowledge about the pharmacodynamics of phage therapy. More data, obtained in animal models, are necessary to evaluate the phage therapy efficiency compared, for example, to antibiotics. Another aspect is the safety of phage therapy. How do phages interact with the immune system and to what costs, or benefits? What are the risks, in the course of phage therapy, of transduction of undesirable properties such as virulence or antibiotic resistance genes? How frequent is the development of bacterial host resistance during phage therapy? Understanding these and many other aspects of phage therapy, basic and applied, is the main subject of this Topic.

A Multidisciplinary Look at Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: An Emerging Multi-Drug-Resistant Global Opportunistic Pathogen

Authors: --- --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889453535 Year: Pages: 133 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-353-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Microbiology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-02-27 16:16:45
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Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a Gram-negative bacterium found in water, plant rhizospheres, animals, and foods. It is associated with a variety of infections in humans, involving respiratory tract (most common), soft tissue and bone, blood, eye, heart, and brain. This opportunistic pathogen is of serious concern to the immunocompromised patient population, and it is also being isolated with increasing frequency from the respiratory tract of individuals with cystic fibrosis. The observed increase worldwide in antibiotic resistance and the ability of this organism to make biofilms on epithelial cells and medical devices make it difficult for health-care personnel to treat infections caused by this pathogen. Recently, several genomes of S. maltophilia have been sequenced, revealing high genetic diversity among isolates. This pathogen uses a variety of molecular mechanisms to acquire and demonstrate resistance to an impressive array of antimicrobial drugs. Research has also focused on the pathogenesis of S. maltophilia in animal models and the resulting host immune response. S. maltophilia is recognized as an important organism in the plant microbiome. This environmental bacterium uses a diffusible signal mechanism for controlling its colonization and interaction with other bacteria and plants. S. maltophilia has also gained considerable research interest for its biotechnological applications, with recent studies on enzyme production, anti-biofilm strategies, biodegradation, and bioremediation. This e-book focuses on the latest developments in the areas of physiology, genomics, infection and immunity, host-pathogen interaction, pathogenesis, antimicrobial resistance and therapy, molecular epidemiology, applied and environmental microbiology, bioremediation and biotechnology.

Freshwater Microplastics: Emerging Environmental Contaminants?

Authors: ---
Book Series: The Handbook of Environmental Chemistry ISSN: 1867-979X ISBN: 9783319616148 9783319616155 Year: Pages: 303 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61615-5 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Grant: Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Subject: Environmental Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-28 17:33:05
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This volume focuses on microscopic plastic debris, also referred to as microplastics, which have been detected in aquatic environments around the globe and have accordingly raised serious concerns. The book explores whether microplastics represent emerging contaminants in freshwater systems, an area that remains underrepresented to date.Given the complexity of the issue, the book covers the current state-of-research on microplastics in rivers and lakes, including analytical aspects, environmental concentrations and sources, modelling approaches, interactions with biota, and ecological implications. To provide a broader perspective, the book also discusses lessons learned from nanomaterials and the implications of plastic debris for regulation, politics, economy, and society. In a research field that is rapidly evolving, it offers a solid overview for environmental chemists, engineers, and toxicologists, as well as water managers and policy-makers.

Application of Nanotechnology in Food Science and Food Microbiology

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889454884 Year: Pages: 213 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-488-4 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Microbiology --- Botany
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:42
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Nanotechnology is a fast-evolving discipline that already produces outstanding basic knowledge and industrial applications for the benefit of society. It is a new emerging and fascinating field of science, that permits advanced research in many areas. The first applications of nanotechnology mainly concerned material sciences; applications in the agriculture and food sectors are still emerging. Food science nanotechnology is an area of rising attention that unties new possibilities for the food industry. Due to the rapid population growth there is a need to produce food and beverages in a more efficient, safe and sustainable way. The application of nanotechnology in food has also gained great importance in recent years in view of its potential application to improve production of food crops, enhance nutrition, packaging and food safety overall. The new materials, products and applications are anticipated to bring lots of improvements to the food and related sectors, impacting agriculture and food production, food processing, distribution, storage, sanitation as well as the development of innovative products and sensors for effective detection of contaminants. Therefore, nanotechnology present with a large potential to provide an opportunity for the researchers of food science, food microbiology and other fields, to develop new tools for incorporation of nanoparticles into food system that could augment existing functions and add new ones.However, the number of relative publications currently available is rather small. The present Research Topic aims to provide with basic information and practical applications regarding all aspects related to the applications of nanotechnology in food science and food microbiology, namely, nanoparticle synthesis, especially through the eco-friendly perspective, potential applications in food processing, biosensor development, alternative strategies for effective pathogenic bacteria monitoring as well as the possible effects on human health and the environment.

Polymeric Materials: Surfaces, Interfaces and Bioapplications

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
ISBN: 9783038979623 / 9783038979630 Year: Pages: 342 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-963-0 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Physics (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-26 08:44:06
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This book collects the articles published in the Special Issue “Polymeric Materials: Surfaces, Interfaces and Bioapplications”. It shows the advances in polymeric materials, which have tremendous applications in agricultural films, food packaging, dental restoration, antimicrobial systems, and tissue engineering. These polymeric materials are presented as films, coatings, particles, fibers, hydrogels, or networks. The potential to modify and modulate their surfaces or their content by different techniques, such as click chemistry, ozonation, breath figures, wrinkle formation, or electrospray, are also explained, taking into account the relationship between the structure and properties in the final application. Moreover, new trends in the development of such materials are presented, using more environmental friendly and safe methods, which, at the same time, have a high impact on our society.

Keywords

corn stalk fiber --- friction composite --- friction and wear --- worn surface morphology --- antifouling coatings --- biofouling --- natural biofilms --- single-stranded conformation polymorphism --- polydimethylsiloxane --- multidimensional scale analysis --- antimicrobial coatings --- porous surfaces --- breath figures --- antimicrobial polymer --- coatings --- hydrogel --- protein-repellent polymer --- surface-attached polymer network --- polymer cross-linking --- alginate modification --- calcium chloride --- microparticles --- spray drying --- prolonged drug release --- gradient wrinkles --- UV/ozone --- irradiance --- polymeric composites --- bonding agents --- antibacterial --- oral biofilms --- periodontal pathogens --- caries inhibition --- recycling --- polypropylene --- biodegradable polymers --- degradation --- inmiscibility --- hemicelluloses --- chitosan --- composite films --- oxygen barrier property --- food packaging --- nanosecond laser surface modification --- ABS (Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene) --- surface wettability --- superhydrophobic --- superhydrophilic --- poly(x-chlorostyrene) --- honeycomb --- breath figures --- conformational entropy --- spinal anatomy --- intervertebral disc --- degenerative disc disease --- herniated disc --- spinal fusion --- total disc replacement --- tissue engineering --- Electrically conductive polymers --- Electroactive biomaterials --- Electrical stimulation --- Smart composites --- Bioelectric effect --- Drug delivery --- Artificial muscle --- bio-based --- fossil --- hybrids --- blends --- packaging --- bio-based polymers --- antimicrobial --- biodegradable --- sustainable --- eco-friendly --- graphene oxide --- chitosan --- composites --- scaffolds --- tissue engineering --- surface modification/functionalization --- surface segregation --- micro- and nanopatterned films --- blends and (nano)composites --- coatings --- surface wettability --- stimuli-responsive materials/smart surfaces --- bioapplications

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