Search results: Found 3

Listing 1 - 3 of 3
Sort by
Breaking the cycle: Attacking the malaria parasite in the liver

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889196951 Year: Pages: 173 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-695-1 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General) --- Microbiology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-04-07 11:22:02
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Despite significant progress in the global fight against malaria, this parasitic infection is still responsible for nearly 300 million clinical cases and more than half a million deaths each year, predominantly in African children less than 5 years of age. The infection starts when mosquitoes transmit small numbers of parasites into the skin. From here, the parasites travel with the bloodstream to the liver where they undergo an initial round of replication and maturation to the next developmental stage that infects red blood cells. A vaccine capable of blocking the clinically silent liver phase of the Plasmodium life cycle would prevent the subsequent symptomatic phase of this tropical disease, including its frequently fatal manifestations such as severe anemia, acute lung injury, and cerebral malaria. Parasitologists, immunologists, and vaccinologists have come to appreciate the complexity of the adaptive immune response against the liver stages of this deadly parasite. Lymphocytes play a central role in the elimination of Plasmodium infected hepatocytes, both in humans and animal models, but our understanding of the exact cellular interactions and molecular effector mechanisms that lead to parasite killing within the complex hepatic microenvironment of an immune host is still rudimentary. Nevertheless, recent collaborative efforts have led to promising vaccine approaches based on liver stages that have conferred sterile immunity in humans – the University of Oxford's Ad prime / MVA boost vaccine, the Naval Medical Research Center’s DNA prime / Ad boost vaccine, Sanaria Inc.'s radiation-attenuated whole sporozoite vaccine, and Radboud University Medical Centre’s and Sanaria's derived chemoprophylaxis with sporozoites vaccines. The aim of this Research Topic is to bring together researchers with expertise in malariology, immunology, hepatology, antigen discovery and vaccine development to provide a better understanding of the basic biology of Plasmodium in the liver and the host’s innate and adaptive immune responses. Understanding the conditions required to generate complete protection in a vaccinated individual will bring us closer to our ultimate goal, namely to develop a safe, scalable, and affordable malaria vaccine capable of inducing sustained high-level protective immunity in the large proportion of the world’s population constantly at risk of malaria.

Lymphocytes in MS and EAE: More than just a CD4+ World

Authors: --- --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889453023 Year: Pages: 160 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-302-3 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Allergy and Immunology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-02-27 16:16:45
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis is degenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS) in which myelin destruction and axon loss leads to the accumulation of physical, cognitive, and mental deficits. MS affects more than a million people worldwide and managing this chronic disease presents a significant health challenge. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that MS is an autoimmune disorder in which immune cells launch an inflammatory attack targeting myelin antigens. Indeed, myelin-reactive T cells and antibodies have been identified in MS patients and in animal models (namely experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, or EAE) that recapitulate many features of human disease. Animal model studies have demonstrated that T cells are both necessary and sufficient to initiate and sustain CNS autoimmunity. However, most MS animal models rely on the role played by CD4+ T cells and partially replicate the multiple aspects of MS pathogenesis. Thus, research in the past has focused heavily on the contribution of CD4+ T cells to the disease process; searching PubMed for “MS AND CD4” yields twice the results as corresponding searches for “CD8” or “B cell” and four times that for “NK cells”. While CD4+ T cells may represent the minimum requirement to mediate CNS autoimmunity, it is clear that the immune response underlying human MS is far more complex and involves numerous other immune cells and subsets. This is well illustrated by the observation that MS patients treated with an anti-CD4 depleting antibody did not gain any clinical benefits whereas removal of several lymphocyte subsets using an anti-CD52 depleting antibody has been shown to impede disease progression. In particular, the pathogenic role(s) of non-CD4+ T cell lymphocytes is relatively poorly understood and under-researched, despite evidence that these subsets contribute to disease pathology or regulation. For example, the observed oligoclonal expansion of CD8+ T cells within the CNS compartment supports a local activation. CD8+ T cells with polarized cytolytic granules are seen in close proximity to oligodendrocytes and demyelinated axons in MS tissues. The presence of B cells in inflammatory lesions and antibodies in the CSF have long been recognized as features of MS and Rituximab, a B cell depleting therapy, has been shown to be highly effective to treat MS. Intriguingly, the putative MS therapeutic reagent Daclizumab may function in part through the expansion of a subset of immunoregulatory NK cells. NKT and ?d T cells may also play a role in CNS autoimmunity, given that they respond to lipid antigens and that myelin is lipid-rich. While different animal models recapitulate some of these aspects of human disease, identifying appropriate models and measures to investigate the role of these less well-understood lymphocytes in MS remains a challenge for the field. This Frontiers research topic aims to create a platform for both animal- and human-focused researchers to share their original data, hypotheses, future perspectives and commentaries regarding the role of these less-well understood lymphocyte subsets (CD8+ T cells, B cells, NK cells, NK T cells, ?d T cells) in the pathogenesis of CNS autoimmunity.

MERS-CoV

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9783039218509 / 9783039218516 Year: Pages: 274 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-851-6 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2020-01-07 09:08:26
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is an emerging zoonotic coronavirus. First identified in 2012, MERS-CoV has caused over 2460 infections and a fatality rate of about 35% in humans. Similar to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), MERS-CoV likely originated from bats; however, different from SARS-CoV, which potentially utilized palm civets as its intermediate hosts, MERS-CoV likely transmits to humans through dromedary camels. Animal models, such as humanized mice and nonhuman primates, have been developed for studying MERS-CoV infection. Currently, there are no vaccines and therapeutics approved for the prevention and treatment of MERS-CoV infection, although a number of them have been developed preclinically or tested clinically. This book covers one editorial and 16 articles (including seven review articles and nine original research papers) written by researchers working in the field of MERS-CoV. It describes the following three main aspects: (1) MERS-CoV epidemiology, transmission, and pathogenesis; (2) current progress on MERS-CoV animal models, vaccines, and therapeutics; and (3) challenges and future prospects for MERS-CoV research. Overall, this book will help researchers in the MERS-CoV field to further advance their work on the virus. It also has important implications for other coronaviruses as well as viruses outside the coronavirus family with pandemic potentials.

Listing 1 - 3 of 3
Sort by
Narrow your search