Search results: Found 5

Listing 1 - 5 of 5
Sort by
Divine Name Verification: An Essay on Anti-Darwinism, Intelligent Design, and the Computational Nature of Reality

Author:
ISBN: 9780615839080 Year: Pages: 424 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0043.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Philosophy
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:43
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

In this book, Noah Horwitz argues that the age of Darwinism is ending. Building on the ontological insights of his first book Reality in the Name of God in order to intervene into the intelligent design versus evolution debate, Horwitz argues in favor of intelligent design by attempting to demonstrate the essentially computational nature of reality. In doing so, Horwitz draws on the work of many of today’s key computational theorists (e.g., Wolfram, Chaitin, Friedkin, Lloyd, Schmidhuber, etc.) and articulates and defends a computational definition of life, and in the process lays out key criticisms of Darwinism. He does so in part by incorporating the insights of the Lamarckian theories of Lynn Margulis and Maximo Sandin. The possible criticisms of a computationalist view from both a developmental perspective (e.g., Lewontin, Jablonka, West-Eberhard, etc.) and chaos theory (e.g., Brian Goodwin) are addressed. In doing so, Horwitz engages critically with the work of intelligent design theorists like William Dembksi. At the same time, he attempts to define the nature of the Speculative Realist turn in contemporary Continental Philosophy and articulates criticisms of leading figures and movements associated with it, such as Object-Oriented Ontology, Quentin Meillassoux, and Ray Brassier. Ultimately, Horwitz attempts to show that rather than heading towards heat death, existence itself will find its own apotheosis at the Omega Point. However, that final glorification is only possible given that all of reality is compressible into the divine name itself.

Contemporary Encounters with Ancient Metaphysics

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9781474412094 9781474431194 Year: DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_628139 Language: English
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 100133
Subject: Philosophy
Added to DOAB on : 2017-04-27 11:01:31
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Like the ancient inquiries into the nature of things, contemporary continental realism and materialism, from Deleuze to the Speculative Realists, embraces a commitment to investigate beings, without subordinating it to analyses of language, consciousness, texts or the social.This pensée brute, traditionally known as metaphysics, dares to question the one and the many, the potential and the actual, the material and immaterial and the world itself. This apparent kinship is not merely thematic, since contemporary thinkers explicitly and repeatedly return to the texts and figures of the Greco-Roman world. In this volume, leading philosophers address these varied, volatile, and novel interactions and themselves contribute to reconceiving and redeploying the problems of ancient metaphysics. Alongside this are 2 original and previously unpublished translations of essays by Gilles Deleuze and Pierre Aubenque.

Tales of Research Misconduct: A Lacanian Diagnostics of Integrity Challenges in Science Novels

Author:
Book Series: Library of Ethics and Applied Philosophy ISSN: 1387-6678 / 2215-0323 ISBN: 9783319655536 9783319655543 Year: Pages: 263 DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-65554-3 Language: English
Publisher: Springer
Subject: Philosophy
Added to DOAB on : 2017-11-24 16:09:15
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

This monograph contributes to the scientific misconduct debate from an oblique perspective, by analysing seven novels devoted to this issue, namely: Arrowsmith by Sinclair Lewis (1925), The affair by C.P. Snow (1960), Cantor’s Dilemma by Carl Djerassi (1989), Perlmann’s Silence by Pascal Mercier (1995), Intuition by Allegra Goodman (2006), Solar by Ian McEwan (2010) and Derailment by Diederik Stapel (2012). Scientific misconduct, i.e. fabrication, falsification, plagiarism, but also other questionable research practices, have become a focus of concern for academic communities worldwide, but also for managers, funders and publishers of research. The aforementioned novels offer intriguing windows into integrity challenges emerging in contemporary research practices. They are analysed from a continental philosophical perspective, providing a stage where various voices, positions and modes of discourse are mutually exposed to one another, so that they critically address and question one another. They force us to start from the admission that we do not really know what misconduct is. Subsequently, by providing case histories of misconduct, they address integrity challenges not only in terms of individual deviance but also in terms of systemic crisis, due to current transformations in the ways in which knowledge is produced. Rather than functioning as moral vignettes, the author argues that misconduct novels challenge us to reconsider some of the basic conceptual building blocks of integrity discourse.

Foucault's Archaeology

Author:
ISBN: 9780748624218 9780748630387 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 101018
Subject: Philosophy
Added to DOAB on : 2018-01-25 11:01:48
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

This book provides a new perspective on Foucault’s The Archaeology of Knowledge by revealing the extent to which its approach to language was influenced by the mathematical sciences. Setting out this background to Foucault’s analysis makes The Archaeology of Knowledge both accessible in a new way, and relevant to issues that are at the heart of much contemporary debate over the nature of critical thought and the relation between philosophy and the sciences. This book sheds new light on a crucial period of Foucault’s work by highlighting his relation to thinkers such as Cavaillès and Serres. It aims to provide a reading of The Archaeology of Knowledge that puts it at the heart Foucault’s thought. Rather than attempting a scientific study of language as such, Foucault is shown to have adopted a mode of thought indebted to thinkers in the scientific and epistemological tradition.

Echoes of No Thing: Thinking between Heidegger and Dōgen

Author:
ISBN: 9781950192014 97819501920201 Year: Pages: 210 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0239.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Philosophy
Added to DOAB on : 2019-03-26 11:21:03
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Echoes of No Thing seeks to understand the space between thinking which Martin Heidegger and the 13th-century Zen patriarch Eihei Dōgen explore in their writing and teachings. Heidegger most clearly attempts this in Contributions to Philosophy (of the Event) and Dōgen in his Shōbōgenzō, a collection of fascicles which he compiled in his lifetime. Both thinkers draw us towards thinking, instead of merely defining systems of thought. Both Heidegger and Dōgen imagine possibilities not apparent in the world we currently inhabit, but notably, find possible, through a refashioning of thinking as a soteriological reimagining that clears space for the presencing of an authentic experience in the space which emerges between certainties. Jenkins elucidates this soteriological reimagining through a close reading of both authors’ conceptions of time and space, and by developing a practice of listening that is attuned to the echoes that resonate between the two thinkers. While Heidegger often wrote about new beginnings (as well as about gathering oneself, preparing the site, clearings, and practicing) in preparation for the evental un-concealing of truth, nowhere is this as present as in the enigmatic, difficult, and in fact beautiful, Contributions. To call a text beautiful, especially a work of philosophy, risks committing an act of disingenuity, and yet Contributions, like Jacques Derrida’s Glas or Walter Benjamin’s unfinished Arcades Project, rises to this acclaim through its very resistance to a system, its refusal to be easily digested, or even understood. Contributions is unfinished, partial, even at times muttered; it is the beginning of a thinking which takes place on a path and as such cannot imagine—or refuse—its final destination. It invites us to take up towards, but not to insist on, its thinking; it is a “turn” away from the reason and logic of a technologized world and returns philosophy—as a thinking—to a place of wonder and awe. Dōgen’s Shōbogenzō, from another culture and time entirely, is also a beautiful text, for similar reasons. The Shōbogenzō, gathered first as a series of talks given by Eihei Dōgen (and later composed as written texts) details the process of understanding which leads, for Dōgen, to a position of pure seeing, or satori, and yet these talks are not simply rules for monks, nor merely imprecations and demands for a laity; rather, they open a being’s thinking to the possibility of something purely other and work as a transition across worlds that also opens us to an other world. What both thinkers illustrate, as do the other thinkers drawn on in this project—most notably, those philosophers associated with the Kyoto School, who were both intimately aware of Dōgen’s work, and studied, or studied with, Heidegger—is that world is not a fixed, stable entity; rather it is a fugal composition of possibility, of as yet untraversed—and at times un-traversable—spaces. Echoes of No Thing seeks to examine, within the lacunal eddies of be-coming’s arrival, that space between which both thinkers point towards as possible sites of new beginnings.

Listing 1 - 5 of 5
Sort by
Narrow your search

Publisher

Edinburgh University Press (2)

punctum books (2)

Springer (1)


License

CC by-nc (2)

CC by-nc-sa (2)

CC by (1)


Language

english (5)


Year
From To Submit

2019 (1)

2017 (2)

2013 (1)

2012 (1)