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New Insights on Basic and Clinical Aspects of EEG and MEG Connectome

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889455317 Year: Pages: 97 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-531-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Neurology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:42
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Recent advances in the neuroimaging field areas allow us to visualize the aggregate of neural connections at the macroscopic level within the brain, the so-called “connectome”. In order to promote the development of the neurophysiological investigation of connectome of brain oscillations, this eBook aims at bringing together contributions from researchers in basic and clinical neuroscience using EEG and MEG connectome analysis. The most important focal point will be to address the functional roles of connectome of brain oscillations in contributing to understandings of higher cognitive processes in normal subjects and pathophysiology of psychiatric diseases. This Research Topic presented novel methodologies and various applications of neurophysiological connectome analysis. As a result, these papers were cited more than 120 times in these four years in total and threw light and impact on new directions for investigating the connectome of human brain.

Why and how is the self related to the brain midline regions?

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889192656 Year: Pages: 207 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-265-6 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-03 13:02:24
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What the self is and where it comes from has been one of the great problems of philosophy for thousands of years. As science and medicine have progressed this question has moved to also become a central one in psychology, psychiatry, and neuroscience. The advent of in vivo brain imaging has now allowed the scientific investigation of the self to progress further than ever. Many such imaging studies have indicated that brain structures along the cortical midline are particularly closely related to self-specific processing. This association between cortical midline structures (CMS) and self is reinforced by the involvement of these regions in other self-oriented processes, such as mind-wandering or stimulus valuation. Those midline regions involved in self- processing also overlap with another network, the default mode network, which shows high brain activity during the so-called resting state, indicating that there may be a special relationship between self-processing and intrinsic activity. Although such promising groundwork linking the self and CMS has been carried out, many questions remain. These include: what features of the midline regions lead to their apparent importance in self-processing? How can we appropriately account for confounding factors such as familiarity or task-effects in our experiments? How is the self-related to other features of the mind, such as consciousness? How is our methodology influencing our attempts to link the self and the brain? The purpose of this ebook is to address some of these questions, including opinions, perspectives, and hypotheses about the concept of the self, the relationship between CMS and the self, and the specific function of these brain regions in self-processing. It also includes original research papers describing EEG, fMRI, and behavioral experiments investigating different aspects of the self.

Brain Connectivity in Autism

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889192823 Year: Pages: 264 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-282-3 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Neurology
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-10 11:59:06
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The brain's ability to process information crucially relies on connectivity. Understanding how the brain processes complex information and how such abilities are disrupted in individuals with neuropsychological disorders will require an improved understanding of brain connectivity. Autism is an intriguingly complex neurodevelopmental disorder with multidimensional symptoms and cognitive characteristics. A biological origin for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) had been proposed even in the earliest published accounts (Kanner, 1943; Asperger, 1944). Despite decades of research, a focal neurobiological marker for autism has been elusive. Nevertheless, disruptions in interregional and functional and anatomical connectivity have been a hallmark of neural functioning in ASD. Theoretical accounts of connectivity perceive ASD as a cognitive and neurobiological disorder associated with altered functioning of integrative circuitry. Neuroimaging studies have reported disruptions in functional connectivity (synchronization of activated brain areas) during cognitive tasks and during task-free resting states. While these insights are valuable, they do not address the time-lagged causality and directionality of such correlations. Despite the general promise of the connectivity account of ASD, inconsistencies and methodological differences among studies call for more thorough investigations. A comprehensive neurological account of ASD should incorporate functional, effective, and anatomical connectivity measures and test the diagnostic utility of such measures. In addition, questions pertaining to how cognitive and behavioral intervention can target connection abnormalities in ASD should be addressed. This research topic of the Frontiers in Human Neuroscience addresses “Brain Connectivity in Autism” primarily from cognitive neuroscience and neuroimaging perspectives.

Molecular Mechanism of Alzheimer's Disease

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ISBN: 9783039214075 9783039214082 Year: Pages: 228 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-408-2 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:16
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Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an age-related neurological disease that affects tens of millions of people, in addition to their carers. Hallmark features of AD include plaques composed of amyloid beta, as well as neurofibrillary tangles of tau protein. However, despite more than a century of study, the cause of Alzheimer’s disease remains unresolved. The roles of amyloid beta and tau are being questioned and other causes of AD are now under consideration. The contributions of researchers, model organisms, and various hypotheses will be examined in this Special Issue.

Keywords

?-secretase --- amyloid beta --- calcium signaling --- drug target discovery --- endoplasmic reticulum --- inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor --- ion channel --- oxidative stress --- ryanodine receptor --- therapy --- amyloid-? oligomer --- protein aggregation --- A?O receptors --- Alzheimer’s disease --- neurodegeneration --- amyloid ? --- Alzheimer’s disease --- cognitive function --- dairy products --- dementia --- inflammation --- microglia --- Alzheimer’s disease --- yeast --- Tau --- amyloid ? --- ubiquitin --- aggregation --- oligomerization --- prion --- CDK5R1 --- lncRNAs --- Alzheimer’s disease --- miR-15/107 --- NEAT1 --- HOTAIR --- MALAT1 --- heat shock response --- heat shock protein --- Alzheimer’s disease --- beta amyloid --- yeast --- Alzheimer’s disease --- complement receptor 1 --- CR1 length polymorphism --- CR1 density --- complement C3b/C4b receptor --- complement --- dementia --- molecular biology --- neurosciences --- genetic risk --- Alzheimer’s disease --- brain glucose metabolism --- neuronal differentiation --- neuronal degeneration --- Prolyl isomerases --- Pin1 --- type 2 diabetes --- type 3 diabetes --- miR-34c --- dendritic spine --- Alzheimer’s disease --- Alzheimer’s disease --- positron emission tomography (PET) --- magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) --- Alzheimer’s disease --- cystathionine-?-lyase CTH gene --- DNA methylation --- epigenetics --- epigenome-wide association study --- methylome --- methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase MTHFR gene --- nutrition --- S-adenosylmethionine --- vitamin B complex --- Alzheimer’s disease --- sleep disturbance --- sleep fragmentation --- slow-wave sleep --- amyloid beta --- tau --- proteostasis --- default-mode network --- cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia --- APOE gene --- apolipoprotein E --- DNA methylation --- mild cognitive impairment --- Hispanics

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