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Dopaminergic Foundations of Personality and Individual Differences

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889194322 Year: Pages: 188 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-432-2 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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For several decades, theory and research has drawn links between dopaminergic neurotransmission and various aspects of personality and individual differences, as well as major personality processes. Recent increases in the availability and affordability of neuroscience methods have permitted thorough investigation of such links as part of the thriving field of personality neuroscience. However, the picture emerging from this body of research is somewhat puzzling; Rather than being linked to only a few converging dimensions of individual differences in psychological functioning, dopamine seems to be associated with a wide range of rather disparate traits and psychopathological conditions including (among various others) impulsivity, extraversion, anxiety, reward sensitivity, approach behaviour, achievement motivation, working memory performance, cognitive flexibility, depression, anhedonia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and schizophrenia. Empirical research in this area typically focuses on only one piece of this puzzle based on a specific strand of theory and a narrow section of relevant prior findings. The present research topic will, for the first time, attempt to provide a fairly complete picture of the whole puzzle including all its disparate parts. Contributors will therefore be explicitly encouraged to go beyond their own specific dopamine-personality hypotheses and place their work in a broader context, thereby helping to forge links between largely non-overlapping research traditions.

50th Anniversary of Adult Neurogenesis: Olfaction, Hippocampus and Beyond

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889199631 Year: Pages: 243 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-963-1 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Neurology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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In the mid-sixties, the discovery by Altman and co-workers of neurogenesis in the adult brain changed the previous conception of the immutability of this organ during adulthood sustained among others by Cajal. This discovery was ignored up to eighty’s when Nottebohm demonstrated neurogenesis in birds. Subsequently, two main neurogenic zones were characterized: the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle and the subgranular layer of the dentate gyrus. Half century later, the exact role of new neurons in the adult brain is not completely understand. This book is composed by a number of articles by leaders in the filed covering from an historic perspective to potential therapeutic opportunities.

Keywords

Alzheimer --- Dopamine --- glia --- Epilepsy --- Exercise --- Stroke

Neuroactive metabolites of ethanol: a behavioral and neurochemical synopsis

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889193752 Year: Pages: 126 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-375-2 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-11-19 16:29:12
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Ethanol is a very elusive drug, which has mechanisms of action that are diverse and relatively non-selective. Moreover, ethanol has been demonstrated to be a biologically active substance by itself, but also a pro-drug of the neuroactive metabolites, acetaldehyde and acetate. Acetaldehyde has traditionally been known as a toxic substance with several effects on multiple systems. However, in the last few decades evidence has accumulated to reveal the specific and, in some instances, distinct neural actions of acetaldehyde and acetate that are in part responsible for some of the observed psychoactive effects of ethanol. The present issue will address these challenges to provide an up-to-date synopsis of the behavioral and neurophysiological impact of the two direct metabolites of ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetate. In doing so, this issue will present human and rodent evidence on their behavioral and neurophysiological impact, either when administered alone as drugs, or when metabolically-derived from their parent compound. Emphasis will be placed to stress the importance of the different enzymatic systems that intervene to produce these metabolites, either peripherally and/or directly in the brain. Similarly, this Research Topic will be aimed at addressing some of the possible mechanisms of action of acetaldehyde and acetate in different brain areas and in different intracellular systems. Furthermore, the issue will lay out some of the suggested mechanisms of action of ethanol and of its metabolites by which they form adducts with other molecules and neurotransmitters such as dopamine and opioids (which lead to salsolinol and tetrahydropapaveroline, respectively), and their impact on the synthesis and actions of neuromodulators such as adenosine and the cannabinoid system.

Keywords

Ethanol --- Catalase --- acetate --- Dopamine --- Salsolinol --- Opioids --- Addiction --- Drug abuse

Neuronal and Psychological Underpinnings of Pathological Gambling

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889193202 Year: Pages: 132 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-320-2 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-02-05 17:24:33
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Like in the case of drugs, gambling hijacks reward circuits in a brain which is not prepared to receive such intense stimulation. Dopamine is normally released in response to reward and uncertainty in order to allow animals to stay alive in their environment – where rewards are relatively unpredictable. In this case, behavior is regulated by environmental feedbacks, leading animals to persevere or to give up. In contrast, drugs provide a direct, intense pharmacological stimulation of the dopamine system that operates independently of environmental feedbacks, and hence causes “motivational runaways”. With respect to gambling, the confined environment experienced by gamblers favors the emergence of excitatory conditioned cues, so that positive feedbacks take over negative feedbacks. Although drugs and gambling may act differently, their abnormal activation of reward circuitry generates an underestimation of negative consequences and promotes the development of addictive/compulsive behavior. In Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease, dopamine-related therapies may disrupt these feedbacks on dopamine signalling, potentially leading to various addictions, including pathological gambling. The goal of this Research Topic is to further our understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the development of pathological gambling. This eBook contains a cross-disciplinary collection of research and review articles, ranging in scope from animal behavioral models to human imaging studies.

Neuronal and glial structural plasticity induced by drugs of abuse

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889195985 Year: Pages: 90 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-598-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Therapeutics
Added to DOAB on : 2016-03-10 08:14:32
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Drugs of abuse induce a host of alterations in brain structure and function, ranging from changes in gene expression and epigenetic processes to aberrant synaptic plasticity to volumetric changes in discrete brain regions. These alterations can be drug class-specific, and are not confined to neurons, as drugs of abuse also induce molecular and cellular alterations in various glial cell types such as astrocytes and microglia. The phenomenon of drug-induced plasticity includes changes in dendritic branching and architecture, dendritic spine density and morphology, astrocyte-neuronal interactions, dysregulation of glutamatergic and GABAergic signaling, and alterations in myelination or microglial phenotype. This drug-induced "rewiring" of the brain at numerous levels can contribute to the development, maintenance, and persistence of the addicted state, as well as associated deficits in normal cognitive functioning. The aim of this Research Topic is to collect recent and important findings related to the structural alterations produced by drug of abuse in neurons, glial, and other cell types of the central nervous system.

Keywords

plasticity --- Dendrite --- Spine --- Glutamate --- Dopamine --- GABA --- Neuron --- glia --- astrocyte --- Addiction

Neuroendocrine mechanisms that connect feeding behavior and stress

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889195077 Year: Pages: 189 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-507-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-03 13:02:24
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Research during the past decade highlights the strong link between appetitive feeding behavior, reward and motivation. Interestingly, stress levels can affect feeding behavior by manipulating hypothalamic circuits and brain dopaminergic reward pathways. Indeed, animals and people will increase or decrease their feeding responses when stressed. In many cases acute stress leads to a decrease in food intake, yet chronic social stressors are associated to increases in caloric intake and adiposity. Interestingly, mood disorders and the treatments used to manage these disorders are also associated with changes in appetite and body weight. These data suggest a strong interaction between the systems that regulate feeding and metabolism and those that regulate mood. This Research Topic aims to illustrate how hormonal mechanisms regulate the nexus between feeding behavior and stress. It focuses on the hormonal regulation of hypothalamic circuits and/or brain dopaminergic systems, as the potential sites controlling the converging pathways between feeding behavior and stress.

Parkinson's Disease Cell Vulnerability and Disease Progression

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889196760 Year: Pages: 194 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-676-0 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-04-07 11:22:02
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Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects 1.5% of the global population over 65 years of age. The hallmark feature of this disease is the degeneration of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and a consequent striatal dopamine deficiency. The pathogenesis of Parkinson's Disease remains unclear. Despite tremendous growth in recent years in our knowledge of the molecular basis of Parkinson's Disease and the molecular pathways of cell death important questions remain regarding why are substantia nigra cells especially vulnerable, which mechanisms underlie progressive cell loss or what do Lewy bodies or alpha-synuclein reveal about disease progression. Understanding the different vulnerability of the dopaminergic neurons from midbrain regions and the mechanisms whereby pathology becomes widespread are primary objectives of basic and clinical research in Parkinson's Disease.This e-Book discusses the etiopathogenesis of Parkinson's Disease, presenting a series of papers that provide up-to-date, state-of-the-art information on molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the neurodegeneration process in the disease, the role of activation of functional anatomical organization of the basal ganglia and in particular habitual vs goal directed systems as a factor of neuronal vulnerability, the possibility that Parkinson's Disease coulb be a prion disease and how genetic factors linked to familial and sporadic forms of PD. We hope that this e-Book will stimulate the continuing efforts to understand the cell and physiological mechanisms underlying the origin of Parkinson's Disease.

Neuromodulation of Executive Circuits

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889197071 Year: Pages: 257 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-707-1 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-04-07 11:22:02
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High-order executive tasks involve the interplay between frontal cortex and other cortical and subcortical brain regions. In particular, the frontal cortex, striatum and thalamus interact via parallel fronto-striatal "loops" that are crucial for the executive control of behavior. In all of these brain regions, neuromodulatory inputs (e.g. serotonergic, dopaminergic, cholinergic, adrenergic, and peptidergic afferents) regulate neuronal activity and synaptic transmission to optimize circuit performance for specific cognitive demands. Indeed, dysregulation of neuromodulatory input to fronto-striatal circuits is implicated in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, depression, and Parkinson's disease. However, despite decades of intense investigation, how neuromodulators influence the activity of fronto-striatal circuits to generate the precise activity patterns required for sophisticated cognitive tasks remains unknown. In part, this reflects the complexity of the cellular microcircuits in these brain regions (i.e. heterogeneity of neuron subtypes and connectivity), cell-type specific expression patterns for the numerous receptor subtypes mediating neuromodulatory signals, and the potential interaction of multiple signaling cascades in individual neurons. This Research Topic includes 10 original research articles and seven review articles addressing the role of neuromodulation in executive function at multiple levels of analysis, ranging from the activity of single voltage-dependent ion channels to computational models of network interactions in cortex-striatum-thalamus systems.

Dynamics of cyclic nucleotide signaling in neurons

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889196463 Year: Pages: 92 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-646-3 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Neurology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-08-16 10:34:25
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Cyclic nucleotides control a number of neuronal properties including neuronal differentiation, pathfinding, regulation of excitability and synaptic transmission, and control of gene expression. Signaling events mediated by cAMP or cGMP are transient and take place within the complex 3-dimensional structure of the neuronal cell. Signaling events happen on the time scale of seconds to minutes and the biological significance of the temporal dimension remains poorly understood. Structural features of neurons (dendritic spines and branches, cell body, nucleus, axon…) as well as AKAPs and other scaffolding proteins that keep signaling enzymes together and form "signaling microdomains", are critical spatial determinants of signal integration. Finally, the types of enzymes involved in signal integration, which are expressed as a number of different types and splice variants, yield another dimension that determines signal integration properties. Biosensor imaging provides direct temporal and spatial measurement of intracellular signals. This novel approach, together with more conventional methods such as biochemistry, electrophysiology, and modeling, now provide a better understanding of the spatial and temporal features of cyclic nucleotide signal integration in living neurons. This topic aims at providing a better understanding of how neurons are "making sense" of cyclic nucleotide signaling in living neurons.

Neurobiological circuit function and computation of the serotonergic and related systems

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889193844 Year: Pages: 165 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-384-4 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Neurology
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-03 13:02:24
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Serotonin is one of the oldest neurotransmitters in evolutionary terms, and the serotonergic system is complex and multifaceted. Serotonin-producing neurons in the raphe nuclei provide serotonin innervations throughout various parts of the brain, modulating cellular excitability and network properties of targeted brain areas, and regulating mood, cognition and behavior. Dysfunctions of the serotonergic system are implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders including depression, schizophrenia, and drug abuse. Although the system has been studied for many years, an integrative account of its functions and computational principles remains elusive. This is partly attributed to the high variability and heterogeneity in terms of neuronal properties and receptor types, and its extensive connections with other brain regions. This Frontiers Research Topic e-book is a collection of recent experimental and computational work and approaches at multiple scales that provide the latest information regarding the integrated functions of the serotonergic system. The contributed papers include a variety of experimental and computational work, and human clinical studies.

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