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Behavioural and Ecological Consequences of Urban Life in Birds

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889454976 Year: Pages: 364 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-497-6 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Ecology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:42
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Urbanization is next to global warming the largest threat to biodiversity. Indeed, it is becoming increasingly evident that many bird species get locally extinct as a result of urban development. However, many bird species benefit from urbanization, especially through the abundance of human-provided resources, and increase in abundance and densities. These birds are intriguing to study in relation to its resilience and adaption to urban environments, but also in relation to its susceptibility and the potential costs of urban life. This Research Topic consisting of 30 articles (one review, two meta-analyzes and 27 original data papers) provides insights into species and population responses to urbanization through diverse lenses, including biogeography, community ecology, behaviour, life history evolution, and physiology.

Inter-cellular Electrical Signals in Plant Adaptation and Communication

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889455218 Year: Pages: 120 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-521-8 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Botany --- Physiology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:42
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Plants use the Sun's energy to synthesize the basic biomolecules that make up all the organic matter of all organisms of terrestrial ecosystems, including ourselves. Therefore, understanding their adaptive mechanisms to variations of environmental factors, both biotic and abiotic, is fundamental, and particularly relevant in the current context of rapid climate change. Some of the most important adaptive mechanisms of plants are the electrical and chemical signaling systems for the exchange of information between proximally and distally located cells. These signalling systems allow plants to dynamically coordinate the activities of all cells under a diversity of situations. In this Research Topic, we present eight articles that bring up new hypothesis and data to understand the mechanisms of systemic electrical signaling and the central role that it plays in adapting the whole plant to different stresses, as well as new findings on intracellular calcium and nitric oxide-based signaling pathways under stress, which could be extrapolated to non-plant research.

Protein Quality Controlling Systems in Plant Responses to Environmental Stresses

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889455584 Year: Pages: 214 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-558-4 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Botany
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:42
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Environmental stress factors negatively affect plant growth by inducing proteins dysfunction. As coping strategies, plant have developed a comprehensive protein quality controlling system (PQCS) to keep proteins homeostasis. In this research topic of “Protein Quality Controlling Systems in Plant Responses to Environmental Stresses”, some latest researches and opinions in this field, including heat shock proteins (HSPs), unfolded protein response (UPR), ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy, were reported, aiming to provide novel insights for increasing crop production under environmental challenges.

The Future of Coral Reefs Subject to Rapid Climate Change: Lessons from Natural Extreme Environments

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889457175 Year: Pages: 198 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-717-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Oceanography
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:43
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Examination of corals and reef-associated organisms which endure in extreme coral reef environments is challenging our understanding of the conditions that organisms can survive under. By studying individuals naturally adapted to unfavorable conditions, we begin to better understand the important traits required to survive rapid environmental and climate change. This Research Topic, comprising reviews, and original research articles, demonstrates the current state of knowledge regarding the diversity of extreme coral habitats, the species that have been studied, and the knowledge to-date on the mechanisms, traits and trade-offs that have facilitated survival.

Redox Homeostasis Managers in Plants under Environmental Stresses

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889198788 Year: Pages: 208 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-878-8 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Environmental Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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The production of cellular oxidants such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an inevitable con-sequence of redox cascades of aerobic metabolism in plants. This milieu is further aggravated by a myriad of adverse environmental conditions that plants, owing to their sessile life-style, have to cope with during their life cycle. Adverse conditions prevent plants reaching their full genetic potential in terms of growth and productivity mainly as a result of accelerated ROS generation-accrued redox imbalances and halted cellular metabolism. In order to sustain ROS-accrued consequences, plants tend to manage a fine homeostasis between the generation and antioxidants-mediated metabolisms of ROS and its reaction products. Well-known for their involvement in the regulation of several non-stress-related processes, redox related components such as proteinaceous thiol members such as thioredoxin, glutaredoxin, and peroxiredoxin proteins, and key soluble redox-compounds namely ascorbate (AsA) and glutathione (GSH) are also listed as efficient managers of cellular redox homeostasis in plants. The management of the cellular redox homeostasis is also contributed by electron carriers and energy metabolism mediators such as non-phosphorylated (NAD+) and the phosphorylated (NADP+) coenzyme forms and their redox couples DHA/AsA, GSSG/GSH, NAD+/NADH and NADP+/NADPH. Moreover, intracellular concentrations of these cellular redox homeostasis managers in plant cells fluctuate with the external environments and mediate dynamic signaling in pant stress responses. This research topic aims to exemplify new information on how redox homeostasis managers are modulated by environmental cues and what potential strategies are useful for improving cellular concentrations of major redox homeostasis managers. Additionally, it also aims to pro-vide readers detailed updates on specific topics, and to highlight so far unexplored aspects in the current context.

Branching and Rooting Out with a CT Scanner: The Why, the How, and the Outcomes, Present and Possibly Future

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889197910 Year: Pages: 91 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-791-0 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Botany --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-02-03 17:04:57
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Until recently, a majority of the applications of X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning in plant sciences remained descriptive; some included a quantification of the plant materials when the root-soil isolation or branch-leaf separation was satisfactory; and a few involved the modeling of plant biology processes or the assessment of treatment or disease effects on plant biomass and structures during growth. In the last decade, repeated CT scanning of the same plants was reported in an increasing number of studies in which moderate doses of X-rays had been used. Besides the general objectives of Frontiers in Plant Science research topics, “Branching and Rooting Out with a CT Scanner” was proposed to meet specific objectives: (i) providing a non-technical update on knowledge about the application of CT scanning technology to plants, starting with the type of CT scanning data collected (CT images vs. CT numbers) and their processing in the graphical and numerical approaches; (ii) drawing the limits of the CT scanning approach, which because it is based on material density can distinguish materials with contrasting or moderately overlapping densities (e.g., branches vs. leaves, roots vs. non-organic soils) but not the others (e.g., roots vs. organic soils); (iii) explaining with a sufficient level of detail the main procedures used for graphical, quantitative and statistical analyses of plant CT scanning data, including fractal complexity measures and statistics appropriate for repeated plant CT scanning, in experiments where the research hypotheses are about biological processes such as light interception by canopies, root disease development and plant growth under stress conditions; (iv) comparing plant CT scanning with an alternative technology that applies to plants, such as the phenomics platforms which target leaf canopies; and (v) providing current and potential users of plant CT scanning with up-to-date information and exhaustive documentation, including clear perspectives and well-defined goals for the future, for them to be even more efficient or most efficient from start in their research work.

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