Search results: Found 10

Listing 1 - 10 of 10
Sort by
A Metaphoric Mind: Selected Writings of Joseph Couture

Author:
ISBN: 9781926836522 9781926836539 9781926836546 Year: Pages: 329 Language: English
Publisher: Athabasca University Press
Added to DOAB on : 2014-08-04 17:04:53
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Dr. Joseph Couture (1930Ð2007), known affectionately as "Dr. Joe," stood at the centre of some of the greatest political, social, and intellectual struggles of Aboriginal peoples in contemporary Canada. A profound thinker and writer, as well as a gifted orator, he easily walked two paths, as a respected Elder and traditional healer and as an educational psychologist, one of the first Aboriginal people in Canada to receive a PhD. His work challenged and transformed long-held views of Canada's Indigenous peoples, and his vision and leadership gave direction to many of the current fields of Aboriginal scholarship. His influence extended into numerous areasÑeducation, addictions and mental health treatment, community development, restorative justice, and federal correctional programming for Aboriginal peoples. With a foreword by Lewis Cardinal, A Metaphoric Mind brings together for the first time key works selected from among Dr. Joe's writings, published and unpublished. Spanning nearly thirty years, the essays invite us to share in his transformative legacy through a series of encounters, with Aboriginal spirituality and ancestral ways of knowing, with Elders and their teachings, with education and its role in politicization, self-determination, and social change, and with the restorative process and the meaning of Native healing.

The West and Beyond: New Perspectives on an Imagined Region

Authors: --- ---
Book Series: The West Unbound:Social and Cultural Studies ISSN: 1915819X ISBN: 9781897425800 9781897425817 Year: Pages: 462 Language: English
Publisher: Athabasca University Press
Added to DOAB on : 2012-03-29 16:37:58
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The West and Beyond explores the state of Western Canadian history, showcasing the research interests of a new generation of scholars while charting new directions for the future and stimulating further interrogation of our past. This dynamic collection encourages dialogue among generations of historians of the West, and among practitioners of diverse approaches to the past. It also reflects a broad range of disciplinary and professional boundaries, offering new ways to understand the West.

Liberalism, Surveillance, and Resistance: Indigenous Communities in Western Canada, 1877-1927

Author:
Book Series: The West Unbound:Social and Cultural Studies ISSN: 1915819X ISBN: 9781897425398 9781897425404 Year: Pages: 337 Language: English
Publisher: Athabasca University Press
Added to DOAB on : 2012-03-29 16:37:58
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Canada is regularly presented as a country where liberalism has ensured freedom and equality for all. Yet with the expansion of settlers into the First Nations territories that became southern Alberta and BC, liberalism proved to be an exclusionary rather than inclusionary force. Between 1877 and 1927, government officials, police officers, church representatives, ordinary settlers, and many others operated to exclude and reform Indigenous people. Presenting Anglo-Canadian liberal capitalist values and structures and interests as normal, natural, and beyond reproach devalued virtually every aspect of Indigenous cultures. This book explores the means used to facilitate and justify colonization, their effects on Indigenous economic, political, social, and spiritual lives, and how they were resisted.

Trail of Story, Traveller's Path: Reflections on Ethnoecology and Landscape

Author:
ISBN: 9781897425350 9781897425367 Year: Pages: 267 Language: English
Publisher: Athabasca University Press
Added to DOAB on : 2012-03-29 16:37:58
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Trail of Story examines the meaning of landscape, drawn from Leslie Main Johnson’s rich experience with diverse environments and peoples, including the Gitksan and Witsuwit’en of northwestern British Columbia, the Kaska Dene of the southern Yukon, and the Gwich’in of the Mackenzie Delta. With passion and conviction, Johnson maintains that our response to our environment shapes our culture, determines our lifestyle, defines our identity, and sets the tone for our relationships and economies. With photos, she documents the landscape and contrasts the ecological relationships with land of First Nations peoples to those of non-indigenous scientists. The result is an absorbing study of local knowledge of place and a broad exploration of the meaning of landscape.

Xwelíqwiya: The Life of a Stó:lō Matriarch

Author:
Book Series: Our Lives: Diary, Memoir, and Letters ISSN: 19216661 ISBN: 9781927356562 9781927356579 9781927356586 Year: Pages: 312 Language: English
Publisher: Athabasca University Press
Added to DOAB on : 2014-08-04 17:04:53
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Xwel’qwiya is the life story of Rena Point Bolton, a Stó:lō matriarch, artist, and craftswoman. Proceeding by way of conversational vignettes, the beginning chapters recount Point Bolton's early years on the banks of the Fraser River during the Depression. While at the time the Stó:lō, or XwŽlmexw, as they call themselves today, kept secret their ways of life to avoid persecution by the Canadian government, Point Bolton's mother and grandmother schooled her in the skills needed for living from what the land provides, as well as in the craftwork and songs of her people, passing on a duty to keep these practices alive. Point Bolton was taken to a residential school for the next several years and would go on to marry and raise ten children, but her childhood training ultimately set the stage for her roles as a teacher and activist. Recognizing the urgent need to forge a sense of cultural continuity among the younger members of her community, Point Bolton visited many communities and worked with federal, provincial, and First Nations politicians to help break the intercultural silence by reviving knowledge of and interest in Aboriginal art. She did so with the deft and heartfelt use of both her voice and her hands. Over the course of many years, Daly collaborated with Point Bolton to pen her story. At once a memoir, an oral history, and an insider ethnography directed and presented by the subject herself, the result attests both to Daly's relationship with the family and to Point Bolton's desire to inspire others to use traditional knowledge and experience to build their own distinctive, successful, and creative lives.

Stories from Quechan Oral Literature

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9782821876170 Language: English
Publisher: Open Book Publishers
Subject: Social Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-06 13:15:39
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The Quechan are a Yuman people who have traditionally lived along the lower part of the Colorado River in California and Arizona. They are well known as warriors, artists, and traders, and they also have a rich oral tradition. The stories in this volume were told by tribal elders in the 1970s and early 1980s. The eleven narratives in this volume take place at the beginning of time and introduce the reader to a variety of traditional characters, including the infamous Coyote and also Kwayúu the giant, Old Lady Sanyuuxáv and her twin sons, and the Man Who Bothered Ants. This book makes a long-awaited contribution to the oral literature and mythology of the American Southwest, and its format and organization are of special interest. Narratives are presented in the original language and in the storytellers' own words. A prosodically-motivated broken-line format captures the rhetorical structure and local organization of the oral delivery and calls attention to stylistic devices such as repetition and syntactic parallelism. Facing-page English translation provides a key to the original Quechan for the benefit of language learners. The stories are organized into “story complexes”, that is, clusters of narratives with overlapping topics, characters, and events, told from diverse perspectives. Inpresenting not just stories but story complexes, this volume captures the art of storytelling and illuminates the complexity and interconnectedness of an important body of oral literature. Stories from Quechan Oral Literature provides invaluable reading for anyone interested in Native American cultural heritage and oral traditions more generally.

We Are Coming Home: Repatriation and the Restoration of Blackfoot Cultural Confidence

Author:
ISBN: 9781771990172 9781771990189 9781771990196 9781771990202 Year: DOI: 10.15215/aupress/9781771990172.01 Language: English
Publisher: Athabasca University Press
Subject: Social Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2016-08-09 22:57:52
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

In 1990, Gerald Conaty was hired as senior curator of ethnology at the Glenbow Museum, with the particular mandate of improving the museum’s relationship with Aboriginal communities. That same year, the Glenbow had taken its first tentative steps toward repatriation by returning sacred objects to First Nations’ peoples. These efforts drew harsh criticism from members of the provincial government. Was it not the museum’s primary legal, ethical, and fiduciary responsibility to ensure the physical preservation of its collections? Would the return of a sacred bundle to ceremonial use not alter and diminish its historical worth and its value to the larger society? Undaunted by such criticism, Conaty oversaw the return of more than fifty medicine bundles to Blackfoot and Cree communities between the years of 1990 and 2000, at which time the First Nations Sacred Ceremonial Objects Repatriation Act (FNSCORA)—still the only repatriation legislation in Canada—was passed. “Repatriation,” he wrote, “is a vital component in the creation of an equitable, diverse, and respectful society.”We Are Coming Home is the story of the highly complex process of repatriation as described by those intimately involved in the work, notably the Piikani, Siksika, and Kainai elders who provided essential oversight and guidance. We also hear from the Glenbow Museum’s president and CEO at the time and from an archaeologist then employed at the Provincial Museum of Alberta who provides an insider’s view of the drafting of FNSCORA. These accounts are framed by Conaty’s reflections on the impact of museums on First Nations, on the history and culture of the Niitsitapi, or Blackfoot, and on the path forward. With Conaty’s passing in August of 2013, this book is also a tribute to his enduring relationships with the Blackfoot, to his rich and exemplary career, and to his commitment to innovation and mindful museum practice.
“…deeply informative and readable…. An absence of Canadian texts in the museum field and in cultural communication leaves open the mistaken idea that we are mere ciphers for practices from abroad. By making an important Alberta story available in this fascinating and important volume, AU Press has performed an essential cultural service for all Canadians.” —Literary Review of Canada

The Teacher and the Superintendent: Native Schooling in the Alaskan Interior, 1904-1918

Author:
Book Series: Our Lives: Diary, Memoir, and Letters ISSN: 19216661 ISBN: 9781927356500 9781927356517 9781927356524 9781927356982 Year: Pages: 440 DOI: 10.15215/aupress/9781927356500.01 Language: English
Publisher: Athabasca University Press
Subject: Education
Added to DOAB on : 2016-08-10 20:09:15
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

From its inception in 1885, the Alaska School Service was charged with the assimilation of Alaskan Native children into mainstream American values and ways of life. Working in the missions and schools along the Yukon River were George E. Boulter and Alice Green, his future wife. Boulter, a Londoner originally drawn to the Klondike, had begun teaching in 1905 and by 1910 had been promoted to superintendent of schools for the Upper Yukon District. In 1907, Green left a comfortable family life in New Orleans to answer the “call to serve” in the Episcopal mission boarding schools for Native children at Anvik and Nenana, where she occupied the position of government teacher. As school superintendent, Boulter wrote frequently to his superiors in Seattle and Washington, DC, to discuss numerous administrative matters and to report on problems and conditions overall.From 1906 to 1918, Green kept a personal journal—hitherto in private possession—in which she reflected on her professional duties and her domestic life in Alaska. Collected in The Teacher and the Superintendent are Boulter’s letters and Green’s diary. Together, their vivid, first- hand impressions bespeak the earnest but paternalistic beliefs of those who lived and worked in immensely isolated regions, seeking to bring Christianity and “civilized” values to the Native children in their care. Beyond shedding private light on the missionary spirit, however, Boulter and Green have also left us an invaluable account of the daily conflicts that occurred between church and government and of the many injustices suffered by the Native population in the face of the misguided efforts of both institutions.

Visiting with the Ancestors: Blackfoot Shirts in Museum Spaces

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9781771990370 9781771990387 9781771990394 Year: Pages: 232 DOI: 10.15215/aupress/9781771990370.01 Language: English
Publisher: Athabasca University Press
Subject: Sociology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-10-14 21:34:07
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

In 2010, five magnificent Blackfoot shirts, now owned by the University of Oxford’s Pitt Rivers Museum, were brought to Alberta to be exhibited at the Glenbow Museum, in Calgary, and the Galt Museum, in Lethbridge. The shirts had not returned to Blackfoot territory since 1841, when officers of the Hudson’s Bay Company acquired them. The shirts were later transported to England, where they had remained ever since.Exhibiting the shirts at the museums was, however, only one part of the project undertaken by Laura Peers and Alison Brown. Prior to the installation of the exhibits, groups of Blackfoot people—hundreds altogether—participated in special “handling sessions,” in which they were able to touch the shirts and examine them up close. The shirts, some painted with mineral pigments and adorned with porcupine quillwork, others decorated with locks of human and horse hair, took the breath away of those who saw, smelled, and touched them. Long-dormant memories were awakened, and many of the participants described a powerful sense of connection and familiarity with the shirts, which still house the spirit of the ancestors who wore them.In the pages of this beautifully illustrated volume is the story of an effort to build a bridge between museums and source communities, in hopes of establishing stronger, more sustaining relationships between the two and spurring change in prevailing museum policies. Negotiating the tension between a museum’s institutional protocol and Blackfoot cultural protocol was challenging, but the experience described both by the authors and by Blackfoot contributors to the volume was transformative. Museums seek to preserve objects for posterity. This volume demonstrates that the emotional and spiritual power of objects does not vanish with the death of those who created them. For Blackfoot people today, these shirts are a living presence, one that evokes a sense of continuity and inspires pride in Blackfoot cultural heritage.

Contested Knowledges: Water Conflicts on Large Dams and Mega-Hydraulic Development

Authors: --- ---
ISBN: 9783038978107 / 9783038978114 Year: Pages: 240 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-811-4 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Environmental Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-26 08:44:06
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Water acquisition, storage, allocation and distribution are intensely contested in our society, whether, for instance, such issues pertain to a conflict between upstream and downstream farmers located on a small stream or to a large dam located on the border of two nations. Water conflicts are mostly studied as disputes around access to water resources or the formulation of water laws and governance rules. However, explicitly or not, water conflicts nearly always also involve disputes among different philosophical views. The contributions to this edited volume have looked at the politics of contested knowledge as manifested in the conceptualisation, design, development, implementation and governance of large dams and mega-hydraulic infrastructure projects in various parts of the world. The special issue has explored the following core questions: Which philosophies and claims on mega-hydraulic projects are encountered, and how are they shaped, validated, negotiated and contested in concrete contexts? Whose knowledge counts and whose knowledge is downplayed in water development conflict situations, and how have different epistemic communities and cultural-political identities shaped practices of design, planning and construction of dams and mega-hydraulic projects? The contributions have also scrutinised how these epistemic communities interactively shape norms, rules, beliefs and values about water problems and solutions, including notions of justice, citizenship and progress that are subsequently to become embedded in material artefacts.

Keywords

hydroelectric development --- hydropower --- dam --- indigenous peoples --- first nations --- Canada --- Site C --- British Columbia --- environmental impacts --- socio-economic impacts --- hydropower --- Mekong River Basin --- political ecology --- STS --- public knowledge controversies --- large dams --- dam safety --- hazard risk --- environmental governance --- uncertainty --- knowledge politics --- marginalization --- political ecology --- Himalayas --- India --- hydropower development --- politicized collective identity --- territory --- collective action --- agonistic unity --- vernacular statecraft --- Dzumsa --- North Sikkim --- hydrosocial territory --- knowledge encounters --- hydraulic utopia --- modernity --- commensuration --- anti-dam movement --- Málaga --- Spain --- hiding hand --- A.O. Hirschman --- irrigation --- hydraulic projects --- San Lorenzo irrigation project --- Chixoy irrigation project --- Peru --- Guatemala --- megadams --- social construction of technology --- politics of the governed --- anti-dam resistance movements --- technological design --- contested knowledge --- Ecuador --- expectations --- hydroelectric megaprojects --- socio-technical imaginaries --- Ecuador --- energy policy --- large dams --- socioenvironmental impacts --- compensation measures --- knowledge systems --- commensuration --- negotiation --- territorial control --- Bolivia --- Jacques Lacan --- psychoanalysis --- fantasy --- mega-dam --- Inga --- DR Congo --- hydropolitics --- mega-hydraulic projects --- modernist traditions --- knowledge arenas --- manufactured ignorance --- depoliticization --- UnGovernance --- dehumanizing rationality --- multi-actor multi-scalar alliances --- co-creation --- power --- n/a

Listing 1 - 10 of 10
Sort by
Narrow your search