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Fungal Disease in Britain and the United States 1850–2000

Authors: ---
Book Series: Science, Technology and Medicine in Modern History ISBN: 9781137392633 9781137377029 Year: Pages: 248 DOI: 10.1057/9781137377029 Language: English
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
Subject: Internal medicine
Added to DOAB on : 2013-12-02 16:29:26
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Abstract

This book is open access under a CC BY license.
The grand narrative of twentieth-century medicine is the conquering of acute infectious diseases and the rise in chronic, degenerative diseases. The history of fungal infections does not fit this picture; indeed, it runs against it - this book charts the path of fungal infections from the mid nineteenth century to the dawn of the twenty-first century, both in Britain and the United States. It examines how fungal infections became more prevalent and serious over the century, a rise that was linked to the increased incidence of chronic diseases and to social, technological and medical 'progress'. In 1900, conditions such as ringworm, athlete's foot and thrush were minor, external and mostly chronic conditions

Chapter Twelve Revealing the Hidden Affliction (Book chapter)

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9781580469616 Year: Pages: 47 Language: English
Publisher: University of Rochester Press Grant: Wellcome Trust - 605972
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-10-09 11:21:13
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By the turn of the twentieth century the British nation’s declining birthrate&#xD;was increasingly the subject of anxious public and scientific debate, as&#xD;the Registrar General’s annual reports continued to confirm a downward&#xD;national trend, which had in fact commenced from the late 1870s.

Introduction (Book chapter)

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ISBN: 9781580469616 Year: Pages: 40 Language: English
Publisher: University of Rochester Press Grant: Wellcome Trust - 605972
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-10-09 11:21:14
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This volume is a necessarily multidisciplinary collection dedicated to the&#xD;extremely difficult task of uncovering and exploring what can be reconstructed&#xD;of the dimensions and the scale of the historical impact of sexually&#xD;transmitted infections (STIs) on human infertility. As a subject for inquiry,&#xD;this comes close to Winston Churchill’s celebrated phrase, “a riddle, wrapped&#xD;in a mystery, inside an enigma.”

Chapter One (The Wrong Kind of ) Gonorrhea in Antiquity (Book chapter)

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ISBN: 9781580469616 Year: Pages: 25 Language: English
Publisher: University of Rochester Press Grant: Wellcome Trust - 605972
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-10-09 11:21:14
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Studying the relationship between disease and fertility in antiquity is challenging.&#xD;The first difficulty is establishing the presence, and then prevalence,&#xD;of any particular condition before an assessment can be made of its demographic&#xD;impact. In the case of what are now called sexually transmitted infections&#xD;(STIs), the empirical obstacles to identifying such infections in the&#xD;classical world are exacerbated by the moralizing that attends discussions of&#xD;sexual practice and that has so strongly characterized the ways sexual behavior&#xD;and pathology have been, and continue to be, conceptually conjoined. Julius&#xD;Rosenbaum’s influential and exhaustive nineteenth-century exploration of&#xD;the ancient history of syphilis (broadly construed), for example, is based on&#xD;the assumption that venereal diseases are caused by the “abuse” of the genital&#xD;organs for nonprocreative purposes. Their history is, therefore, the history&#xD;of human “lasciviousness and debauchery,” and there was so much of that&#xD;in classical Greece and Rome that syphilis and all kinds of genital afflictions&#xD;necessarily followed.

Advances and Applications of Nano-antimicrobial Treatments

ISBN: 9783038423805 9783038423812 Year: Pages: 150 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Chemistry (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-04-13 12:58:27
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Nowadays, great concerns are associated with the resistance demonstrated by many microorganisms towards the conventional antibiotic therapies. The failure of traditional antimicrobials, and the increasing healthcare costs, have encouraged scientific research and the development of novel antimicrobial agents. Particularly, there is a great deal of interest in nanotechnologies and in antibacterial products obtained through the incorporation of antibacterial agents or the deposition of antibacterial coatings for prevention of biofilm-associated infections.The main focus of the forthcoming Special Issue is, therefore, to present the most recent efforts in scientific research in the development of advanced antimicrobial materials, with special attention to nature-inspired antimicrobial agents and antimicrobials nanomaterials and nanocoatings. For this purpose, we intend to collect original research articles and reviews on the synthesis and characterization of antimicrobial agents, as well as on the development of antimicrobial products for different applications.

Abbreviations (Book chapter)

Book title: Fungal Disease in Britain and the United States 1850–2000 : Mycoses and Modernity

Authors: ---
Book Series: Science, Technology and Medicine in Modern History ISBN: 9781137377012 Year: Pages: 225 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Grant: Wellcome Trust - 074971
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:57

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In this book, we discuss the changing medical and public profile of fungal infections in the period 1850–2000. We consider four sets of diseases: ringworm and athlete’s foot (dermatophytosis); thrush or candidiasis (infection with Candida albicans); endemic, geographically specific infections in North America (coccidioidomycosis, blastomycosis and histoplasmosis) and mycotoxins; and aspergillosis (infection with Aspergillus fumigatus). We discuss each disease in relation to developing medical knowledge and practices, and to social changes associated with ‘modernity’. Thus, mass schooling provided ideal conditions for the spread of ringworm of the scalp in children, and the rise of college sports and improvement of personal hygiene led to the spread of athlete’s foot. Antibiotics seemed to open the body to more serious Candida infections, as did new methods to treat cancers and the development of transplantation. Regional fungal infections in North America came to the fore due to the economic development of certain regions, where population movement brought in non-immune groups who were vulnerable to endemic mycoses. Fungal toxins or mycotoxins were discovered as by-products of modern food storage and distribution technologies. Lastly, the rapid development and deployment of new medical technologies, such as intensive care and immunosuppression in the last quarter of the twentieth century, increased the incidence of aspergillosis and other systemic mycoses.

Aspergillosis (Book chapter)

Book title: Fungal Disease in Britain and the United States 1850–2000 : Mycoses and Modernity

Authors: ---
Book Series: Science, Technology and Medicine in Modern History ISBN: 9781137377012 Year: Pages: 225 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Grant: Wellcome Trust - 074971
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:57

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Abstract

In this book, we discuss the changing medical and public profile of fungal infections in the period 1850–2000. We consider four sets of diseases: ringworm and athlete’s foot (dermatophytosis); thrush or candidiasis (infection with Candida albicans); endemic, geographically specific infections in North America (coccidioidomycosis, blastomycosis and histoplasmosis) and mycotoxins; and aspergillosis (infection with Aspergillus fumigatus). We discuss each disease in relation to developing medical knowledge and practices, and to social changes associated with ‘modernity’. Thus, mass schooling provided ideal conditions for the spread of ringworm of the scalp in children, and the rise of college sports and improvement of personal hygiene led to the spread of athlete’s foot. Antibiotics seemed to open the body to more serious Candida infections, as did new methods to treat cancers and the development of transplantation. Regional fungal infections in North America came to the fore due to the economic development of certain regions, where population movement brought in non-immune groups who were vulnerable to endemic mycoses. Fungal toxins or mycotoxins were discovered as by-products of modern food storage and distribution technologies. Lastly, the rapid development and deployment of new medical technologies, such as intensive care and immunosuppression in the last quarter of the twentieth century, increased the incidence of aspergillosis and other systemic mycoses.

Ringworm (Book chapter)

Book title: Fungal Disease in Britain and the United States 1850–2000 : Mycoses and Modernity

Authors: ---
Book Series: Science, Technology and Medicine in Modern History ISBN: 9781137377012 Year: Pages: 225 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Grant: Wellcome Trust - 074971
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:57

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Abstract

In this book, we discuss the changing medical and public profile of fungal infections in the period 1850–2000. We consider four sets of diseases: ringworm and athlete’s foot (dermatophytosis); thrush or candidiasis (infection with Candida albicans); endemic, geographically specific infections in North America (coccidioidomycosis, blastomycosis and histoplasmosis) and mycotoxins; and aspergillosis (infection with Aspergillus fumigatus). We discuss each disease in relation to developing medical knowledge and practices, and to social changes associated with ‘modernity’. Thus, mass schooling provided ideal conditions for the spread of ringworm of the scalp in children, and the rise of college sports and improvement of personal hygiene led to the spread of athlete’s foot. Antibiotics seemed to open the body to more serious Candida infections, as did new methods to treat cancers and the development of transplantation. Regional fungal infections in North America came to the fore due to the economic development of certain regions, where population movement brought in non-immune groups who were vulnerable to endemic mycoses. Fungal toxins or mycotoxins were discovered as by-products of modern food storage and distribution technologies. Lastly, the rapid development and deployment of new medical technologies, such as intensive care and immunosuppression in the last quarter of the twentieth century, increased the incidence of aspergillosis and other systemic mycoses.

Athlete’s Foot (Book chapter)

Book title: Fungal Disease in Britain and the United States 1850–2000 : Mycoses and Modernity

Authors: ---
Book Series: Science, Technology and Medicine in Modern History ISBN: 9781137377012 Year: Pages: 225 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Grant: Wellcome Trust - 074971
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:57

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Abstract

In this book, we discuss the changing medical and public profile of fungal infections in the period 1850–2000. We consider four sets of diseases: ringworm and athlete’s foot (dermatophytosis); thrush or candidiasis (infection with Candida albicans); endemic, geographically specific infections in North America (coccidioidomycosis, blastomycosis and histoplasmosis) and mycotoxins; and aspergillosis (infection with Aspergillus fumigatus). We discuss each disease in relation to developing medical knowledge and practices, and to social changes associated with ‘modernity’. Thus, mass schooling provided ideal conditions for the spread of ringworm of the scalp in children, and the rise of college sports and improvement of personal hygiene led to the spread of athlete’s foot. Antibiotics seemed to open the body to more serious Candida infections, as did new methods to treat cancers and the development of transplantation. Regional fungal infections in North America came to the fore due to the economic development of certain regions, where population movement brought in non-immune groups who were vulnerable to endemic mycoses. Fungal toxins or mycotoxins were discovered as by-products of modern food storage and distribution technologies. Lastly, the rapid development and deployment of new medical technologies, such as intensive care and immunosuppression in the last quarter of the twentieth century, increased the incidence of aspergillosis and other systemic mycoses.

Conclusion (Book chapter)

Book title: Fungal Disease in Britain and the United States 1850–2000 : Mycoses and Modernity

Authors: ---
Book Series: Science, Technology and Medicine in Modern History ISBN: 9781137377012 Year: Pages: 225 Language: English
Publisher: Springer Grant: Wellcome Trust - 074971
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:57

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Abstract

In this book, we discuss the changing medical and public profile of fungal infections in the period 1850–2000. We consider four sets of diseases: ringworm and athlete’s foot (dermatophytosis); thrush or candidiasis (infection with Candida albicans); endemic, geographically specific infections in North America (coccidioidomycosis, blastomycosis and histoplasmosis) and mycotoxins; and aspergillosis (infection with Aspergillus fumigatus). We discuss each disease in relation to developing medical knowledge and practices, and to social changes associated with ‘modernity’. Thus, mass schooling provided ideal conditions for the spread of ringworm of the scalp in children, and the rise of college sports and improvement of personal hygiene led to the spread of athlete’s foot. Antibiotics seemed to open the body to more serious Candida infections, as did new methods to treat cancers and the development of transplantation. Regional fungal infections in North America came to the fore due to the economic development of certain regions, where population movement brought in non-immune groups who were vulnerable to endemic mycoses. Fungal toxins or mycotoxins were discovered as by-products of modern food storage and distribution technologies. Lastly, the rapid development and deployment of new medical technologies, such as intensive care and immunosuppression in the last quarter of the twentieth century, increased the incidence of aspergillosis and other systemic mycoses.

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