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Lectures on the Statutes of the Sacred Order of St. John of Jerusalem : at the University (of Studies) of Malta 1792

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Book Series: Juris Fontes : Rechtsquellen in Vergangenheit und Gegenwart / Hrsg. von D. Majer, W. Hoehne, W.-D. Barz ISSN: 18683576 ISBN: 9783866444027 Year: Volume: 2 Pages: 261 p. DOI: 10.5445/KSP/1000012200 Language: ENGLISH
Publisher: KIT Scientific Publishing
Subject: Law
Added to DOAB on : 2016-08-11 12:46:27
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The Statutes of the Order of Malta were compiled anew in 1776; they are still valid as subsidiary. Micallef, a Maltese Conventual Chaplain of the Order and professor at the Order's University of Malta, delivered lectures on the Statutes which were printed in a very limited number in 1791.Edited in English is included with the lectures' text .a brief history of the Order and of the University together with a short biography on Micallef; in appendix: the present Constitution and Code of the Order.

Chapter 4 - Quarantine in Ceuta and Malta in the travel writings of the late-eighteenth-century Moroccan ambassador Ibn Uthmân Al-Meknassî (Book chapter)

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Book Series: Social Histories of Medicine ISBN: 9781526127365 Year: Pages: 18 Language: English
Publisher: Manchester University Press Grant: European Commission’s OpenAIRE project
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Social Sciences --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-03-17 11:02:33
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This chapter examines the writings of the renowned late-eighteenth-century Moroccan ambassador Ibn Uthmân Al-Meknassî, the first known traveller from his country to leave an account of European quarantine as experienced during his two diplomatic missions in Spain’s Ceuta (1779) and Malta’s Valletta (1782). It shows that quarantine, on the one hand, acted as a marker of otherness by which Ibn Othman was identified as a Muslim, though this was not a uniform process, owing to the fact that significant differences existed in the degree of alterity experienced in Spain and Malta, and indeed other parts of the Mediterranean. The subjective opinion on quarantine, on the other hand, was also one of the means through which Ibn Uthmân situated himself within Makhzen (Moroccan government) elites at a time when a division between those who declared themselves in favour of European-style modernisation and those who advocated a rejection of European novelties was already visible.

Coleridge's Laws: A Study of Coleridge in Malta

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ISBN: 9781906924133 Year: Pages: 403 DOI: 10.11647/OBP.0005 Language: English
Publisher: Open Book Publishers
Subject: History --- Migration --- Law
Added to DOAB on : 2012-04-06 03:32:42
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge is best known as a great poet and literary theorist, but for one, quite short, period of his life he held real political power—acting as Public Secretary to the British Civil Commissioner in Malta in 1805. This was a formative experience for Coleridge which he later identified as being one of the most instructive in his entire life. In this book, Barry Hough and Howard Davis show how Coleridge's actions whilst in a position of power differ markedly from the idealism he had advocated before taking office - shedding new light on Coleridge's sense of political and legal morality. Meticulously researched and including newly discovered archival materials, Coleridge's Laws provides detailed analysis of the laws and public notices drafted by Coleridge, together with the first published translations of them. Drawing from a wealth of primary sources, Hough and Davis identify the political challenges facing Coleridge and reveal that, in attempting to win over the Maltese public to support Britain's strategic interests, Coleridge was complicit in acts of government which were both inconsistent with the rule of law and contrary to his professed beliefs. Coleridge's willingness to overlook accepted legal processes and personal misgivings for political expediency is disturbing and, as explained by Michael John Kooy in his extensive introduction, necessarily alters our understanding of the author and his writing. Coleridge's Laws contributes in new ways to the current debates about Coleridge's achievements, British colonialism and its engagement with the rule of law, nationhood and the effectiveness of the British administration of Malta. It provides essential reading for anybody interested in Coleridge specifically and the Romantics more generally, for political and legal historians and for students of colonial government.

Coleridge's Laws

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ISBN: 9781906924140 Year: Pages: 403 DOI: 10.11647/OBP.0005 Language: English
Publisher: Open Book Publishers
Subject: Law --- History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-04-04 11:01:51
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Abstract

Samuel Taylor Coleridge is best known as a great poet and literary theorist, but for one, quite short, period of his life he held real political power — acting as Public Secretary to the British Civil Commissioner in Malta in 1805. This was a formative experience for Coleridge which he later identified as being one of the most instructive in his entire life. In this book, Barry Hough and Howard Davis show how Coleridge's actions whilst in a position of power differ markedly from the idealism he had advocated before taking office — shedding new light on Coleridge's sense of political and legal morality. Meticulously researched and including newly discovered archival materials, Coleridge's Laws provides detailed analysis of the laws and public notices drafted by Coleridge, together with the first published translations of them. Drawing from a wealth of primary sources, Hough and Davis identify the political challenges facing Coleridge and reveal that, in attempting to win over the Maltese public to support Britain's strategic interests, Coleridge was complicit in acts of government which were both inconsistent with the rule of law and contrary to his professed beliefs. Coleridge's willingness to overlook accepted legal processes and personal misgivings for political expediency is disturbing and, as explained by Michael John Kooy in his extensive introduction, necessarily alters our understanding of the author and his writing. Coleridge's Laws contributes in new ways to the current debates about Coleridge's achievements, British colonialism and its engagement with the rule of law, nationhood and the effectiveness of the British administration of Malta. It provides essential reading for anybody interested in Coleridge specifically and the Romantics more generally, for political and legal historians and for students of colonial government.

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