Search results: Found 8

Listing 1 - 8 of 8
Sort by
Cotton Nero A.x: The Works of the "Pearl" Poet

Authors: --- --- ---
ISBN: 9780615983912 Year: Pages: 54 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0066.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:41
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Manuscript Cotton Nero A.x takes its designation from the unique cataloging system of seventeenth-century British antiquarian Sir Robert Cotton’s library: busts of historical figures atop shelves provided the organizing principle, such that one found this particular codex under the bust of Roman Emperor Nero, on the top shelf, ten volumes over. (Another famous manuscript, containing Beowulf, is called Cotton Vitellius A.xv.) Cotton Nero A.x contains the only versions of the poems we now know as Pearl, Cleanness, Patience, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, generally agreed to have been composed sometime in the latter half of the fourteenth century—the time of Piers Plowman and Geoffrey Chaucer, though radically different from either. No one knows who the poet was. No one knows if more than one poet wrote some or all of the poems. Together, they present a stunning array of themes, allegories, and images that critics continue to puzzle over: Patience offers a psychologically complex rendering of the Old Testament story of Jonah and the whale; Cleanness explores its homiletic theme in carnal and spiritual terms with complexity, irony, and even humor; Pearl provides a dream allegory that pushes at the distinction between its earthly and heavenly meanings, challenging the very notion of metaphysical transcendence its form seems to point towards. Finally, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the most secular of the poems, is a sophisticated take on Arthurian legend that unfolds like a psychosexual mystery novel, with no easy solution in sight. All the poems are rendered in a difficult Middle English dialect and intricate alliterative form, which sometimes involves a complex rhyme scheme as well. As poet-medievalists, we bow before the poetic achievement of the works in Cotton Nero A.x in all their multi-faceted richness. This is not a translation, nor an interpretation. It is what might be called a trace. A response. A homework assignment from beyond the grave, for four students who should have known better. A dream we hope to dream.

Literatures of Medieval France

Author:
ISBN: 9782722604391 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Collège de France
Added to DOAB on : 2017-03-08 14:29:04
License: OpenEdition licence for Books

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

This long tradition would certainly not be a reason in itself to keep or restore the subject, had it not something to do with the subject itself. All of the associations between the past and literature, all of the signs that point towards an essential link between the notion of literature and a feeling for the past, are crystallized in medieval literature. The curiosity that medieval literature has aroused since it was rediscovered at the dawn of Romanticism presupposes such associations. The...

Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe

Author:
Book Series: The New Middle Ages ISBN: 9781349950737 9781137544391 Year: Pages: 282 DOI: 10.1057/978-1-137-54439-1 Language: English
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2017-03-10 16:54:41
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

This book examines social and medical responses to the disfigured face in early medieval Europe, arguing that the study of head and facial injuries can offer a new contribution to the history of early medieval medicine and culture, as well as exploring the language of violence and social interactions. Despite the prevalence of warfare and conflict in early medieval society, and a veritable industry of medieval historians studying it, there has in fact been very little attention paid to the subject of head wounds and facial damage in the course of war and/or punitive justice. The impact of acquired disfigurement —for the individual, and for her or his family and community—is barely registered, and only recently has there been any attempt to explore the question of how damaged tissue and bone might be treated medically or surgically. In the wake of new work on disability and the emotions in the medieval period, this study documents how acquired disfigurement is recorded across different geographical and chronological contexts in the period.

Voces de mujeres en la Edad Media. Entre realidad y ficción

Author:
ISBN: 9783110596755 Year: Pages: 536 DOI: 10.1515/9783110596755 Language: Spanish, Portuguese
Publisher: De Gruyter
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2018-11-14 18:42:56
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The contributions gathered in this volume take a fresh look at the medieval history of women. From powerful nobility as a cultural actor, to prominent and lesser-known female writers, including female protagonists of lyric poetry and narrative literature, the book offers interdisciplinary perspectives on historical, authorial, and textual femininity.

The Passenger: Medieval Texts and Transits

Author:
ISBN: 9781947447363 9781947447370 Year: Pages: 136 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0190.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:32
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

What strange transactions take place in the mobile spaces between loci? How does the flow of forces between fixed points enliven texts, suggest new connections, and map out the dizzying motion of myriad interactions? The essays in this volume were first presented at the 2014 New Chaucer Society Congress in Reykjavik, Iceland where a meeting of minds in a shared intermediate space initiated dialogue from diverse perspectives and wended its way through the invisible spaces between concrete categories, objects, and entities. The resulting volume asks a core question: what can we learn by tarrying at the nexus points and hubs through which things move in and out of texts, attempting to trace not the things themselves or their supposedly stable significations, but rather their forms of emergence and retreat, of disorder and disequilibrium? The answer is complex and intermediate, for we ourselves are emerging and retreating within our own systems of transit and experiencing our own disequilibrium. Scholarship, like transit, is never complete and yet never congeals into inertia.

Wounds and Wound Repair in Medieval Culture

Authors: ---
Book Series: Explorations in Medieval Culture ISBN: 9789004306455 Year: Pages: 645 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_606734 Language: English
Publisher: Brill Grant: Wellcome Trust - 097469
Subject: Medicine (General) --- History --- Languages and Literatures --- History of arts
Added to DOAB on : 2016-04-22 11:01:18
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The spectacle of the wounded body figured prominently in the Middle Ages, from images of Christ’s wounds on the cross, to the ripped and torn bodies of tortured saints who miraculously heal through divine intervention, to graphic accounts of battlefield and tournament wounds—evidence of which survives in the archaeological record—and literary episodes of fatal (or not so fatal) wounds. This volume offers a comprehensive look at the complexity of wounding and wound repair in medieval literature and culture, bringing together essays from a wide range of sources and disciplines including arms and armaments, military history, medical history, literature, art history, hagiography, and archaeology across medieval and early modern Europe. Contributors are Stephen Atkinson, Debby Banham, Albrecht Classen, Joshua Easterling, Charlene M. Eska, Carmel Ferragud, M.R. Geldof, Elina Gertsman, Barbara A. Goodman, Máire Johnson, Rachel E. Kellett, Ilana Krug, Virginia Langum, Michael Livingston, Iain A. MacInnes, Timothy May, Vibeke Olson, Salvador Ryan, William Sayers, Patricia Skinner, Alicia Spencer-Hall, Wendy J. Turner, Christine Voth, and Robert C. Woosnam-Savage.

Visible Prowess?: Reading Men’s Head and Face Wounds in Early Medieval Europe to 1000 CE (Book chapter)

Book title: Wounds and Wound Repair in Medieval Culture

Authors: ---
Book Series: Explorations in Medieval Culture ISBN: 9789004292796 9789004306455 Year: Pages: 645 Language: English
Publisher: Brill Grant: Wellcome Trust - 097469
Subject: Medicine (General) --- History --- Languages and Literatures --- History of arts
Added to DOAB on : 2018-06-22 11:01:03
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

The spectacle of the wounded body figured prominently in the Middle Ages, from images of Christ’s wounds on the cross, to the ripped and torn bodies of tortured saints who miraculously heal through divine intervention, to graphic accounts of battlefield and tournament wounds—evidence of which survives in the archaeological record—and literary episodes of fatal (or not so fatal) wounds. This volume offers a comprehensive look at the complexity of wounding and wound repair in medieval literature and culture, bringing together essays from a wide range of sources and disciplines including arms and armaments, military history, medical history, literature, art history, hagiography, and archaeology across medieval and early modern Europe. Contributors are Stephen Atkinson, Debby Banham, Albrecht Classen, Joshua Easterling, Charlene M. Eska, Carmel Ferragud, M.R. Geldof, Elina Gertsman, Barbara A. Goodman, Máire Johnson, Rachel E. Kellett, Ilana Krug, Virginia Langum, Michael Livingston, Iain A. MacInnes, Timothy May, Vibeke Olson, Salvador Ryan, William Sayers, Patricia Skinner, Alicia Spencer-Hall, Wendy J. Turner, Christine Voth, and Robert C. Woosnam-Savage.

Chaucer and the Poets

Author:
ISBN: 9781501707230 Year: Pages: 256 Language: English
Publisher: Cornell University Press
Subject: Multidisciplinary
Added to DOAB on : 2016-10-26 08:56:43
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

In this sensitive reading of Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde, Winthrop Wetherbee redefines the nature of Chaucer’s poetic vision. Using as a starting point Chaucer’s profound admiration for the achievement of Dante and the classical poets, Wetherbee sees the Troilus as much more than a courtly treatment of an event in ancient history—it is, he asserts, a major statement about the poetic tradition from which it emerges. Wetherbee demonstrates the evolution of the poet-narrator of the Troilus, who begins as a poet of romance, bound by the characters’ limited worldview, but who in the end becomes a poet capable of realizing the tragic and ultimately the spiritual implications of his story.

Listing 1 - 8 of 8
Sort by