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The Enlightenment and religion: The myths of modernity

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ISBN: 9780719067402 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Manchester University Press
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2011-11-04 00:00:00
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The Enlightenment and religion: The myths of modernity offers a critical survey of religious change and its causes in eighteenth-century Europe, and constitutes a radical challenge to the accepted views in traditional Enlightenment studies. Focusing on Enlightenment Italy, France and England, it illustrates how the canonical view of eighteenth-century religious change has in reality been constructed upon scant evidence and assumption, in particular the idea that the thought of the enlightened led to modernity. For despite a lack of evidence, one of the fundamental assumptions of Enlightenment studies has been the assertion that there was a vibrant deist movement that formed the 'intellectual solvent' of the eighteenth century. The central claim of this book is that the immense ideological appeal of the traditional birth-of-modernity myth has meant that the actual lack of deists has been glossed over, and a quite misleading historical view has become entrenched. As a consequence more traditional forces for religious change have been given little or no attention. The book also raises hitherto neglected but fundamental methodological issues relating to the study of the eighteenth century and the ability of 'interested' contemporaries to mislead posterity. Given the current pervasive topicality of notions of modernity and postmodernity in academia, this book advances a very important discussion indeed, and will be essential reading for all students studying the period.

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enlightenment --- modernity --- religion

The creative city does not exist

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ISBN: 9788867053995 Year: Pages: 160 Language: English
Publisher: Ledizioni - LediPublishing
Subject: Sociology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-04-21 12:43:59
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Every city wants to become creative, perhaps even the most creative ever. But what does it mean to be a creative city? What images take shape as a consequence? What sort of city do we envisage? Which one are we actually building?In a journey that starts with Blade Runner and passes through English punk, Milanese creative workers and Star Wars, the book explores the features and outcomes of the creative city, penetrating its dark side but also identifying its assets. In the future, cities must be guided by a vision of a creative city able to be inclusive yet competitive, to open new public spaces and to be socially innovative. This book presents some of the tools that allow us to look at the city as a place whose air makes people free.

The German-Jewish Experience Revisited

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Book Series: Perspectives on Jewish Texts and Contexts ISSN: 2199-6962 ISBN: 9783110367195 Year: Volume: 3 Pages: 288 DOI: 10.1515/9783110367195 Language: English
Publisher: De Gruyter
Subject: History --- Religion
Added to DOAB on : 2018-11-14 18:42:56
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This volume includes both historical treatments of differing German-Jewish understandings of their experience – their relations to their Judaism, general culture and to other Jews – and contemporary reflections and competing interpretations as to how to understand the overall experience of German Jewry.

Hunger and Modern Writing: Melville, Kafka, Hamsun, and Wright

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ISBN: 9783946198161 9783946198192 9783946198178 9783946198185 Year: Pages: 160 DOI: 10.16994/baf Language: English
Publisher: Modern Academic Publishing
Subject: Philosophy --- Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2016-12-29 13:23:08
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"Hunger is a contentious theme in modernist literature, and this study addresses its relevance in the works of four major American and European writers. Taking an in-depth look at works by Melville, Kafka,Hamsun, and Wright, it argues that hunger is deeply involved with concepts of modernity and modern literature. Exploring how it is bound up with the writer’s role in modern society this study draws on two conflicting and complex views of hunger: the first is material, relating to the body as a physical entity that has a material existence in reality. Hunger, in this sense, is a physiological process that affects the body as a result of the need for food, the lack of which can lead to discomfort, listlessness, and eventually death. The second view is that of hunger as an appetite of the mind, the kind of hunger for immaterial things that is associated with an individual’s desire for a new form of knowledge, sentiment, or a different way of perceiving the reality of the world. By discussing the selected authors’ conceptualization of hunger as both desire and absence of desire, or as both a creative and a destructive force, it examines how it has influenced literary representations of modern life. This study then offers a focused approach to a broad field of inquiry and presents analyses that address a variety of critical perspectives on hunger and modern literature.&#xD;Daniel Rees completed his PhD in American and Comparative Literature at the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich. His research interests include Anglo-American and European literature of the modern period. He has worked as a freelance editor and translator since 2004 and contributed publications in the e-journal Current Objectives of Postgraduate American Studies and to Orchid Press."

Subjects of modernity: Time-space, disciplines, margins

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Book Series: Theory for a Global Age ISBN: 9781526105134 Year: Pages: 192 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_621857 Language: English
Publisher: Manchester University Press
Subject: Political Science --- Anthropology --- Philosophy
Added to DOAB on : 2017-01-05 11:01:13
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This book thinks through modernity and its representations by exploring critical considerations of time and space. Drawing on anthropology, history and social theory, it investigates the oppositions and enchantments, the contradictions and contentions, and the identities and ambivalences spawned under modernity. Crucially, it understands these antinomies not as errors, but as constitutive elements of modern worlds. The book questions routine portrayals of homogeneous time and antinomian blueprints of cultural space, while acknowledging the production of time and space by social subjects. Instead of assuming a straightforward, singular trajectory for the phenomena, it views modernity as involving checkered, contingent and contended processes of meaning and power, which have found heterogeneous historical elaborations over the past five centuries. Bringing together past and present, theory and narrative, it sows the historical, ethnographic and methodological deep into its critical procedures, offering an innovative understanding of cultural identities and imaginatively exploring the relationship between history and anthropology.

Rodin-Lekturen

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ISBN: 9783946198246 9783946198253 9783946198260 9783946198277 Year: Pages: 328 DOI: 10.16994/bah Language: German
Publisher: Modern Academic Publishing
Subject: Social Sciences --- History of arts --- Arts in general
Added to DOAB on : 2017-11-07 11:01:52
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the title Figurenkunst und Künstlerfigur turns to the art-critical writings on the Gates of Hell (1880). In this chapter, famous art critics and writers such as Edmond de Goncourt, Gustave Geffroy, Anatole France and Arthur Symons are at the centerof interest. For the generation of the symbolist art critics, for example, the Gates of Hell became an icon of their own melancholic art doctrine insofar as the art work seemed to stage a temporality of deferral and hesitation which could be understood as a counter-image to an all-too-optimistic belief in historical progress. At the same time, Rodin’s apparent inability to bring this work to an end seemed to betray a very similar understanding of time. Rilke’s and Simmel’s interpretations of Rodin’s work, which are at the core of the following chapter, are described as theoretically ambitious attempts of emulating the art-critical debate at the turn of the century by using innovative narrative strategies of coalescing biographical patterns and reflections on art (Rilke) or by declaring Rodin’s work to be the ideal object for an analysis of modernity in the context of contemporary sociology (Simmel).&#xD;The sixth chapter, entitled Verlust und Wiederbelebung, turns to two interpretations by German-speaking authors in the years around 1950: the philosopher Günther Anders and the art historian Josef Schmoll. gen. Eisenwerth. Anders, who was also a student of Edmund Husserl, described Rodin’s sculptural images of the human body as artistic expressions of an historical experience of loss and isolation, as objects which could stimulate a deepened reflection about modernity as crises. Josef Schmoll gen. Eisenwerth’s investigations of the motif of the torso, which emerged in the 1950s, rather tried to describe the fragmented body as the »symbol« of an aesthetic experience of totality and holism. Obviously, the art historian’s strategy of emphatically denying the disturbing aesthetic effects of some of Rodin’s torsos can be – at least from today’s perspective – conceived as a way of dealing with the historical experience of the collapse of civilization.&#xD;The last chapter of the study is entitled Auf dem Weg in die Postmoderne. It focuses on the writings of Leo Steinberg and Rosalind Krauss since the 1960s. While Steinberg was mostly interested in the diverse ways of how Rodin constructed and deconstructed the meanings of his sculptures with the help of the art forms of the »montage« and the »assemblage«, thereby ostentatiously demonstrating the sculptural »semiosis«, Krauss emphatically turned to the problem of ›reading‹ Rodin’s images of the human body. For her, Rodin’s sculptures became emblems of an ›opaque‹ subjectivity and therefore the first artistic realizations of a radically new paradigm of aesthetic reception: Instead of clinging to the traditional notions of psychological and hermeneutical depth in the beholding of sculptures, in her view Rodin’s sculptures emphasize the material surface as the original site of the production of meaning."

Modernism as Institution

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Book Series: Stockholm Studies in Culture and Aesthetics ISBN: 9789176350683 9789176350713 9789176350690 9789176350706 Year: Pages: 346 DOI: 10.16993/bar Language: English
Publisher: Stockholm University Press
Subject: History of arts --- Arts in general
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-15 13:34:10
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"Anyone who studies the history of modern art—in art museums, in the classroom, in art historical handbooks or specialist surveys—will soon be aware of a certain recurrent pattern governing the selection of objects and forming a certain type of narrative where the history of modern art is presented as a variety of different -isms that dissolve into each other in the coherent sequence that constitutes the history of modern art as modernism.&#xD;But why is this pattern so similar in all different places and contexts? Is it possible to distinguish between the history of modern art and the history of modernism? And if so, when, where and how did modernism become synonymous with art of the modern era?&#xD;With a dual perspective—regarding art as well as the discursive perception of art—Modernism as an Institution attempts to answer these questions by studying the frameworks for the institutional establishment, as well as the historiography, of modern art."&#xD;

Nicholas of Cusa and the Kairos of Modernity: Cassirer, Gadamer, Blumenberg

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ISBN: 9780615840550 Year: Pages: 114 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0045.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Philosophy
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:43
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In this far-reaching essay, historian Michael Edward Moore examines modernity as an historical epoch following the end of the medieval period — and as a “messianic concept of time.” In the early twentieth century, a debate over the meaning and origins of modernity unfolded among the philosophers Ernst Cassirer, Hans-Georg Gadamer and Hans Blumenberg. These thinkers tried to resolve the puzzle of the fifteenth-century master Nicholas of Cusa. Was Cusanus the last great medieval thinker, his ideas a summa of medieval tradition? Or was he a mysterious epochal figure, seated at one end of the bridge leading to modern thought? Nicholas of Cusa lived during a time of historical and existential crisis, or kairos, when medieval governments and cherished sources of unity were shaken. Likewise, the debate over his significance took place during a later phase of crisis for Europe, in the decades before and after the Second World War, when the collapse of European civilization was witnessed. Moore argues that modernity, so intently examined as an historical and spiritual problem, has significance for our contemporary sense of crisis.

A literary mirror; Balinese reflections on modernity and identity in the twentieth century

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Book Series: Verhandelingen van het Koninklijk Instituut voor Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde ISBN: 9789067183703 9789004253636 Year: Volume: 271 Pages: xiv + 378 DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_371572 Language: English
Publisher: Brill
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2011-11-04 00:00:00
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A literary mirror; Balinese reflections on modernity and identity in the twentieth century&#xD;I Nyoman Darma Putra &#xD;&#xD;A literary mirror is the first English-language work to comprehensively analyse Indonesian-language literature from Bali from a literary and cultural viewpoint. It covers the period from 1920 to 2000. This is an extremely rich field for research into the ways Balinese view their culture and how they respond to external cultural forces. This work complements the large number of existing studies of Bali and its history, anthropology, traditional literature, and the performing arts.&#xD;&#xD;A literary mirror is an invaluable resource for those researching twentieth-century Balinese authors who wrote in Indonesian. Until now, such writers have received very little attention in the existing literature. An appendix gives short biographical details of many significant writers and lists their work. &#xD;&#xD;I Nyoman Darma Putra teaches Indonesian literature in the Faculty of Arts at Udayana University in Bali. He is the author of several books in Indonesian on a variety of literary and cultural topics, including Tonggak Baru Sastra Bali Modern (2000; 2010), Wanita Bali Tempo Doeloe Perspektif Masa Kini (2003; 2007) and Bali dalam Kuasa Politik (2008). From 2007 to 2010 he was a postdoctoral research fellow at the School of Languages and Comparative Cultural Studies, University of Queensland, during which time a number of his articles were published in journals including Indonesia and the Malay World, Asian Studies Review and Rima.

Constructions of Cancer in Early Modern England

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ISBN: 9781137487520 9781137569196 9781137487537 Year: Pages: 219 DOI: 10.1057/9781137487537 Language: English
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan Grant: Wellcome Trust - 093090
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-17 17:40:53
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The study of early modern cancer is significant for our understanding of the period’s medical theory and practice. In many respects, cancer exemplifies the flexibility of early modern medical thought, which managed to accommodate, seemingly without friction, the notion that cancer was a disease with humoral origins alongside the conviction that the malady was in some sense ontologically independent. Discussions of why cancer spread rapidly through the body, and was difficult, if not impossible, to cure, prompted various medical explanations at the same time that physicians and surgeons joined with non-medical authors in describing the disease as acting in a way that was ‘malignant’ in the fullest sense, purposely ‘fierce’, ‘rebellious’ and intractable.3 Theories seeking to explain why cancer appeared most often in the female breast similarly joined culturally mediated anatomical and humoral theory with recognition of the peculiarities of women’s social, domestic and emotional life-cycles. Moreover, as a morbid disease, cancer generated eclectic and sometimes extreme medical responses, the mixed results of which would prompt many questions over the proper extent of pharmaceutical or surgical intervention.

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