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Tempestades clássicas: dos antigos

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Book Series: Humanitas Supplementum ISSN: 21828814 ISBN: 9789892615417 Year: Pages: 346 DOI: https://doi.org/10.14195/978-989-26-1542-4 Language: Portuguese
Publisher: Coimbra University Press
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2019-03-01 00:11:02
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This work will analyze scenes describing storms in Greek, Latin and Portuguese Literature, through the Classical Poetic ideas of tópos, imitation and emulation, discussed in the Introduction and in the Chapter 1 of this work. It will follow a line starting with the Homeric poems, passing by the poetry of Callimachus, accessing the poetry of Virgil and Ovid, and finally reaching the poetry of Camões and the many Portuguese chroniclers of the Age of the Discovery. The main objective of this work is to observe the development of the tópos of the storm in the Western Literature.

Keywords

Storm --- Homer --- Virgil --- Ovid

Kommunikationsräume im kaiserzeitlichen Rom

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Book Series: Topoi – Berlin Studies of the Ancient World/Topoi – Berliner Studien der Alten Welt ISSN: 2191-5806 ISBN: 9783110266429 Year: Volume: 6 Pages: xviii, 278 DOI: 10.1515/9783110266429 Language: German
Publisher: De Gruyter
Subject: Languages and Literatures --- History --- Archaeology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-13 10:20:34
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The ancient city of Rome can be understood as an ensemble of monuments, as aspace of actionfor its inhabitants, as a literary construction. Communication took place in it, about it and through it; that is by means of furnishing it with a conscious programme of buildings and works of art. From the perspective of various classical disciplines, the papers in this volume analyse the relationships between these three forms of communication about the city of Rome from the beginning of the Principate to Late Antiquity.

Ovid, Metamorphoses, 3.511-733: Latin Text with Introduction, Commentary, Glossary of Terms, Vocabulary Aid and Study Questions

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Book Series: Classics Textbooks ISSN: 20542437 20542445 ISBN: 9781783740826 9781783740840 Year: Volume: 1 Pages: 260 DOI: 10.11647/OBP.0073 Language: English
Publisher: Open Book Publishers
Subject: Languages and Literatures --- Education
Added to DOAB on : 2016-09-22 13:08:54
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This extract from Ovid's 'Theban History' recounts the confrontation of Pentheus, king of Thebes, with his divine cousin, Bacchus, the god of wine. Notwithstanding the warnings of the seer Tiresias and the cautionary tale of a character Acoetes (perhaps Bacchus in disguise), who tells of how the god once transformed a group of blasphemous sailors into dolphins, Pentheus refuses to acknowledge the divinity of Bacchus or allow his worship at Thebes. Enraged, yet curious to witness the orgiastic rites of the nascent cult, Pentheus conceals himself in a grove on Mt. Cithaeron near the locus of the ceremonies. But in the course of the rites he is spotted by the female participants who rush upon him in a delusional frenzy, his mother and sisters in the vanguard, and tear him limb from limb.The episode abounds in themes of abiding interest, not least the clash between the authoritarian personality of Pentheus, who embodies 'law and order', masculine prowess, and the martial ethos of his city, and Bacchus, a somewhat effeminate god of orgiastic excess, who revels in the delusional and the deceptive, the transgression of boundaries, and the blurring of gender distinctions.This course book offers a wide-ranging introduction, the original Latin text, study aids with vocabulary, and an extensive commentary. Designed to stretch and stimulate readers, Gildenhard and Zissos's incisive commentary will be of particular interest to students of Latin at AS and undergraduate level. It extends beyond detailed linguistic analysis to encourage critical engagement with Ovid's poetry and discussion of the most recent scholarly thought.

Ovid, Amores (Book 1)

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Book Series: Dickinson College commentaries ISSN: 20595743 20595751 ISBN: 9781783741625 9781783741649 Year: Volume: 1 Pages: 266 DOI: 10.11647/OBP.0067 Language: English
Publisher: Open Book Publishers
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2016-07-14 15:34:57
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From Catullus to Horace, the tradition of Latin erotic poetry produced works of literature which are still read throughout the world. Ovid’s Amores, written in the first century BC, is arguably the best-known and most popular collection in this tradition. This book contain embedded audio files of the original text read aloud by Aleksandra Szypowska.Born in 43 BC, Ovid was educated in Rome in preparation for a career in public services before finding his calling as a poet. He may have begun writing his Amores as early as 25 BC. Although influenced by poets such as Catullus, Ovid demonstrates a much greater awareness of the funny side of love than any of his predecessors. The Amores is a collection of romantic poems centered on the poet’s own complicated love life: he is involved with a woman, Corinna, who is sometimes unobtainable, sometimes compliant, and often difficult and domineering. Whether as a literary trope, or perhaps merely as a human response to the problems of love in the real world, the principal focus of these poems is the poet himself, and his failures, foolishness, and delusions.By the time he was in his forties, Ovid was Rome’s most important living poet; his Metamorphoses, a kaleidoscopic epic poem about love and hatred among the gods and mortals, is one of the most admired and influential books of all time. In AD 8, Ovid was exiled by Augustus to Romania, for reasons that remain obscure. He died there in AD 17.The Amores were originally published in five books, but reissued around 1 AD in their current three-book form. This edition of the first book of the collection contains the complete Latin text of Book 1, along with commentary, notes and full vocabulary. Both entertaining and thought-provoking, this book will provide an invaluable aid to students of Latin and general readers alike.

Ovid on Cosmetics

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ISBN: 9781472514424 9781472506740 9781472507495 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 102546
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-03-08 11:21:04
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The Medicamina Faciei Femineae is a didactic elegy which showcases an early example of Ovid's trademark combination of a moralistic, instructive form and trivial subject and meter. Exploring female beauty and cosmetics, with particular emphasis on the concept of ‘cultus', the poem also presents five practical recipes for cosmetic treatments used by Roman women. Covering both didactic parody and pharmacological reality, this deceptively complex poem possesses wit, vivacity and importance. The first full study devoted to this little-researched but multi-faceted poem, Ovid on Cosmetics includes an in-depth introduction which situates the poem within its literary heritage of didactic and elegiac poetry, its place in Ovid's oeuvre and its relevance to social values, personal aesthetics and attitudes to female beauty in Roman society.

Chaucer and the Poets

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ISBN: 9781501707230 Year: Pages: 256 Language: English
Publisher: Cornell University Press
Subject: Multidisciplinary
Added to DOAB on : 2016-10-26 08:56:43
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In this sensitive reading of Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde, Winthrop Wetherbee redefines the nature of Chaucer’s poetic vision. Using as a starting point Chaucer’s profound admiration for the achievement of Dante and the classical poets, Wetherbee sees the Troilus as much more than a courtly treatment of an event in ancient history—it is, he asserts, a major statement about the poetic tradition from which it emerges. Wetherbee demonstrates the evolution of the poet-narrator of the Troilus, who begins as a poet of romance, bound by the characters’ limited worldview, but who in the end becomes a poet capable of realizing the tragic and ultimately the spiritual implications of his story.

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