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Regulation and targeting of enzymes mediating Parkinson's disease pathogenesis: focus on Parkinson's disease Kinases, GTPases and ATPases

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889193998 Year: Pages: 163 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-399-8 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-10 11:59:06
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Understanding the molecular pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a priority in biomedical research and a pre-requisite to improve early disease diagnosis and ultimately to developing disease-modifying strategies. In the past decade and a half, geneticists have identified several genes that are involved in the molecular pathogenesis of PD. They not only identified gene variants segregating with familial forms of PD but also genetic risk factors of sporadic PD via genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Understanding how PD genes and their gene products function holds the promise of unraveling key PD pathogenic processes. Therefore the precise cellular role of PD proteins is currently the subject of intense investigation.Interestingly, a number of PD proteins have enzymatic functions, including kinase, GTPase or ATPase functions. In the context of understanding disease pathogenesis or developing disease-modifying therapies, enzymes possess several useful features. Firstly, enzymes are often key elements of cellular signaling networks, acting as on-off switches to determine signaling intensity. For instance, kinases mediate phosphorylation events, which activate or inactivate their substrates, while GTPases modulate activity of their effector proteins via direct interaction in a GDP/GTP dependent manner. ATPases also control cellular processes through their involvement in cellular energy production and/or in transmembrane transport. Secondly, enzymes are attractive targets for therapeutics development. This is exemplified by the growing number of kinase inhibitors approved for clinical use, while compounds modulating GTPases or ATPases have also been proposed as potential therapeutics. Finally, as elements in cellular signaling networks, enzymes are not generally constitutively active but subject to further regulation through additional signaling components. Knowledge of how PD kinases, GTPases and ATPases are activated or inactivated can aid in understanding how PD signaling networks are deregulated in disease and point to new possibilities in targeting pathological signaling processes. The objective of this research topic is to provide an overview of current knowledge on the regulation of cellular signaling networks of PD kinases, GTPases and ATPases. Both upstream and downstream signaling events will be covered, with a focus on molecular events that can readily be monitored (relevance as disease biomarkers) and have a potential to be modulated (relevance as potential therapeutic target).

Cyclic Nucleotide Signaling and the Cardiovascular System

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ISBN: 9783038429890 9783038429906 Year: Pages: XII, 294 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Therapeutics --- Biochemistry
Added to DOAB on : 2018-07-10 11:59:17
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The cyclic nucleotides 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) play important roles in the control of cardiovascular function under physiological and pathological conditions. In this book, which is a reprint of a Special Issue of the Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease entitled "Cyclic Nucleotide Signaling and the Cardiovascular System", internationally recognized experts give an overview of this vibrant scientific field. The first series of articles deal with the localization and function of membrane-bound and soluble adenylate cyclases, followed by articles on the roles of phosphodiesterase isoforms in the heart. Cyclic nucleotide signaling takes place in nanodomains and the A-kinase anchor proteins (AKAPS) are essential for the compartmentalized assembly of signaling proteins into functional complexes. Reviews on the role of AKAP proteins in the physiology and pathophysiology of the heart are also included in this book. Cyclic nucleotides act through effector proteins and articles on EPAC and POPDC proteins inform the reader of recent developments on these topics. A major advancement in our understanding of cyclic nucleotide signaling came through the use of genetically encoded cAMP sensor molecules, and a series of articles review the current insight that these reporter molecules have provided. The final set of articles in this book deals with the association of the cyclic nucleotide pathway and cardiovascular disease as well as the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Thomas Brand and Enno Klussmann Special Issue Editors

HSPs - Ambiguous Mediators of Immunity

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889451524 Year: Pages: 92 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-152-4 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-08-28 14:01:09
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Heat shock proteins (HSPs) were discovered as polypeptides induced by stress that can be found in all kingdoms of cellular organisms. Their functions were, a first enigmatic and these proteins were thus classified by molecular weight, as in—Hsp27, Hsp70, Hsp90, Hsp110. More recently, each of these size-classified molecules has attributed a role in protein folding, and they thus came to be known, as a class, as molecular chaperones. However, the they possess properties beyond chaperoning. Indeed, their discovery in the extracellular spaces suggested roles in regulation of the immune responses.

Dietary Protein and Muscle in Aging People

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ISBN: 9783038974574 / 9783038974581 Year: Pages: 160 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03897-458-1 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Nutrition and Food Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2019-02-14 10:56:39
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This Special Issue of Nutrients, entitled “Dietary Proteins and Muscle in Aging People”, welcomes the submission of manuscripts either reporting original research or reviewing the scientific literature. Manuscripts should focus on the mechanisms linking dietary protein with muscle quality and quantity. Articles presenting results from clinical trials testing protein interventions on muscle mass and function are welcome. The Special Issue aims at including articles spanning different disciplines to explore the topic of interest. Reports from basic to clinical and population research are suitable. Articles adopting a longitudinal approach or reporting data from life-long interventions/observations in the exploration of the theme will be given special consideration.Potential topics include, but are not limited to:•Description of patterns of dietary protein consumption across life•Influence of dietary protein intake on the functional status of older people•Preclinical and clinical studies describing the mechanisms through which protein intake modifies muscle mass and function•Protein/amino acid supplementation interventions against sarcopenia, cachexia, or disease conditions associated with muscle wasting in old age•Disease-specific alterations modifying the effects of dietary protein intake on skeletal muscles•Effects of the interactions of dietary protein intake and gut microbiota on skeletal muscles]

The Evolving Telomeres

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889198818 Year: Pages: 74 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-881-8 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Genetics
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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What controls the different rates of evolution to give rise to conserved and divergent proteins and RNAs? How many trials until evolution can adapt to physiological changes? Every organism has arisen through multiple molecular changes, and the mechanisms that are employed (mutagenesis, recombination, transposition) have been an issue left to the elegant discipline of evolutionary biology. But behind the theory are realities that we have yet to ascertain: How does an evolving cell accommodate its requirements for both conserving its essential functions, while also providing a selective advantage? In this volume, we focus on the evolution of the eukaryotic telomere, the ribo-nuclear protein complex at the end of a linear chromosome. The telomere is an example of a single chromosomal element that must function to maintain genomic stability. The telomeres of all species must provide a means to avoid the attrition from semi-conservative DNA replication and a means of telomere elongation (the telomere replication problem). For example, telomerase is the most well-studied mechanism to circumvent telomere attrition by adding the short repeats that constitutes most telomeres. The telomere must also guard against the multiple activities that can act on an unprotected double strand break requiring a window (or checkpoint) to compensate for telomere sequence loss as well as protection against non-specific processes (the telomere protection problem). This volume describes a range of methodologies including mechanistic studies, phylogenetic comparisons and data-based theoretical approaches to study telomere evolution over a broad spectrum of organisms that includes plants, animals and fungi. In telomeres that are elongated by telomerases, different components have widely different rates of evolution. Telomerases evolved from roots in archaebacteria including splicing factors and LTR-transposition. At the conserved level, the telomere is a rebel among double strand breaks (DSBs) and has altered the function of the highly conserved proteins of the ATM pathway into an elegant means of protecting the chromosome end and maintaining telomere size homeostasis through a competition of positive and negative factors. This homeostasis, coupled with highly conserved capping proteins, is sufficient for protection. However, far more proteins are present at the telomere to provide additional species-specific functions. Do these proteins provide insight into how the cell allows for rapid change without self-destruction?

Marine Proteins and Peptides

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ISBN: 9783038426462 9783038426479 Year: Pages: 476 Language: English
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2018-02-08 13:06:14
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Marine proteins and peptides have great potential application in developing pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, and cosmeceuticals. Proteins and peptides from marine sources are considered to be safe and inexpensive. Protein- and peptide-based drugs have been increasing in recent days to cure various diseases by serving multiple roles, such as antioxidants, anticancer drugs, antimicrobials, and anticoagulants. There are different marine sources (macroalgae, fish, shellfish, and bivalves), which possibly contain specific protein and peptides.

Comparative studies between HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 function and pathobiology

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889194988 Year: Pages: 94 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-498-8 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Microbiology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2015-11-16 15:44:59
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Human T-cell leukemia viruses type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) share a common genetic organization, expression strategy and ability to infect and immortalize T-cells in vitro; however, HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 are strikingly different in terms of clinical impact. HTLV-1 is recognized as the aetiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), and HTLV-associated myeolopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), in contrast, HTLV-2 does not cause hematologic disorders and is only sporadically associated with cases of subacute myelopathy. HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 also exhibit distinct cellular tropisms in vivo: HTLV-1 is mainly found in CD4+T lymphocytes, whereas CD8+T-cells are the preferred target for HTLV-2. The articles contributed in this Research Topic are covering all the different aspects that characterize HTLV-1 and HTLV-2, by highlighting differences in their biology that might provide clues to their distinct pathogenic properties.

Keywords

HTLV-1 --- HTLV-2 --- Expression --- Proteins --- Co-infection

The immunology of cellular stress proteins

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889193257 Year: Pages: 89 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-325-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-03-10 08:14:32
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Stress proteins or heat-shock proteins (HSP) are evolutionary conserved proteins present in every prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell. Their main function is to protect cells and proteins from damage under stressful circumstances. The latter circumstances do include the cell and protein damaging effects of inflammation. The discovery of mycobacterial HSP60 being a critical antigen in the model of adjuvant arthritis, has led to studies that showed the immuno-dominance of microbial HSP60 and the potential of the microbial HSP induced repertoire of antibodies and T cells to cross-recognize the self-HSP homologues of stressed cells. Since then, the research in the immunology of stress proteins started to comprise a widening spectrum of topics with potential medical relevance. Interestingly, since stress proteins have their activities in both innate and adaptive immunity, they are key elements in the cross-roads between both arms of the immune system. Stress proteins or HSP can be considered as functional 'biomarkers' of inflammation. They are up-regulated locally during inflammation and interestingly, they seem to function as targets for anti-inflammatory regulatory T cells. In experimental models of autoimmunity, mainly arthritis, administration of HSP peptides have been shown to suppress disease. First clinical trials have shown the anti-inflammatory nature of T cell responses to Hsp. In type I diabetes and in rheumatoid arthritis, parenteral and oral administration of Hsp peptides were shown to induce a bias in pro-inflammatory T cells, switching them in the direction of regulatory cytokine production (IL4, IL5 and IL10). In addition a raised level of a marker of natural T regulatory cells, the transcription factor FoxP3, was noted in the RA trial. Other inflammatory diseases or diseases with inflammatory components which feature the immune imprint of the up-regulated Hsp are atherosclerosis, inflammatory bowel diseases, multiple sclerosis and atopic diseases such atopic dermatitis and allergic asthma.

Geometries of the Living

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ISBN: 9782722604377 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Collège de France
Added to DOAB on : 2016-04-04 11:23:49
License: OpenEdition licence for Books

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My idea of a theory in biology is quite different from the theoretical biology that is expressed as equations of observed or photographed phenomena. I have a simpler, more concrete conception. Not a mathematical description of what is seen, but an evolving model, a tool developed through bricolage, with mathematics perhaps, but also natural language: one that serves above all to understand the unseen; to guess, beneath the visible, the invisible dimensions of life forms, the underlying “logic”.

The HSP70 Molecular Chaperone Machines

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889451258 Year: Pages: 69 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-125-8 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2017-07-06 13:27:36
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Members of the HSP70 family form a central hub of the molecular chaperone network, controlling protein homeostasis in prokaryotes and in the ATP-containing compartments of the eukaryotic cells. The heat-inducible form HSPA1A (HSP70), its constitutive cytosolic cognate HSPA8 (Hsc70), its endoplasmic reticulum form HSPA5 (BiP), and its mitochondrial form HSPA9 (Mortalin), as well as the more distantly related HSPHs (HSP110s), make up 1-2 % of the total mass of proteins in human cells. They use the energy of ATP-hydrolysis to prevent and forcefully revert the process of protein misfolding and aggregation during and following various stresses, presumably by working as unfoldases to lift aberrant conformers out of kinetic traps. As such, HSP70s, in cooperation with their J-domain co-chaperones and nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) and co-disaggregases, form an efficient network of cellular defenses against the accumulation of cytotoxic misfolded protein conformers, which may cause degenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, and aging in general. In addition to their function in repair of stress-induced damage, HSP70s fulfill many housekeeping functions, including assisting the de novo folding and maturation of proteins, driving the translocation of protein precursors across narrow membrane pores into organelles, and by controlling the oligomeric state of key regulator protein complexes involved in signal transduction and vesicular trafficking. For reasons not well understood, HSP70s are also found on the surface of some animal cells, in particular cancer cells where they may serve as specific targets for cancer immunotherapy. Here, we gathered seven mini reviews, each presenting a complementary aspect of HSP70’s structure and function in bacteria and eukaryotes, under physiological and stressful conditions. These articles highlight how, the various members of this conserved family of molecular chaperones, assisted by their various J-domain and NEF cochaperones and co-disaggregases, harness ATP hydrolysis to perform a great diversity of life-sustaining cellular functions using a similar molecular mechanism.

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