Search results: Found 7

Listing 1 - 7 of 7
Sort by
A sad tale’s best for winter

Author:
ISBN: 9782840160861 9782821850927 Year: Language: French
Publisher: Presses universitaires de Paris Nanterre
Added to DOAB on : 2017-05-29 10:33:34
License: OpenEdition licence for Books

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Œuvre composite, Le Conte d’hiver a longtemps été une œuvre décriée par la critique. Redécouverte au début du xxe siècle, la pièce a depuis fait l’objet de nombreuses interprétations novatrices et reprises au théâtre. Ce volume s’inscrit dans ce renouveau critique, et se propose d’étudier les sources et l’identité littéraire de la pièce, la comparaison entre les arts qu’elle propose, et de se plonger dans une réflexion sur l’enfance, la parole féminine, les relations passionnelles, le libre-...

To Be, or Not to Be: Paraphrased

Author:
ISBN: 9789491914089 Year: Pages: 150 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0227.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-03-29 11:21:07
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

To Be, or Not to Be: Paraphrased is an expanding deconstruction of Hamlet’s famous existential question, achieved by putting the line through paraphrasing software 50 times. With each permutation, the quotation grows longer and its meaning is distorted, causing the question to question its own existence by acting as a faulty self-replicator, a nonsensical self-affirmation that destroys itself in the process of becoming. This controlled explosion of a sentence was performed by Bardsley Rosenbridge as part of his work with the Dark Meaning Research Institute, a group of parasemantic experimenters developing innovative ways to extract hidden meaning from the world around us.

Posthuman Lear: Reading Shakespeare in the Anthropocene

Author:
ISBN: 9780692641576 Year: Pages: 202 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0133.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:36
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Approaching King Lear from an eco-materialist perspective, Posthuman Lear examines how the shift in Shakespeare’s tragedy from court to stormy heath activates a different sense of language as tool-being — from that of participating in the flourish of aristocratic prodigality and circumstance, to that of survival and pondering one’s interdependence with a denuded world. Dionne frames the thematic arc of Shakespeare’s tragedy about the fall of a king as a tableaux of our post-sustainable condition. For Dionne, Lear’s progress on the heath works as a parable of flat ontology. At the center of Dionne’s analysis of rhetoric and prodigality in the tragedy is the argument that adages and proverbs, working as embodied forms of speech, offer insight into a nonhuman, fragmentary mode of consciousness. The Renaissance fascination with memory and proverbs provides an opportunity to reflect on the human as an instance of such enmeshed being where the habit of articulating memorized patterns of speech works on a somatic level. Dionne theorizes how mnemonic memory functions as a potentially empowering mode of consciousness inherited by our evolutionary history as a species, revealing how our minds work as imprinted machines to recall past prohibitions and useful affective scripts to aid in our interaction with the environment. The proverb is that linguistic inscription that defines the equivalent of human-animal imprinting, where the past is etched upon collective memory within ‘adagential” being that lives on through the generations as autonomic cues for survival.

The Retro-Futurism of Cuteness

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9781947447288 9781947447295 Year: Pages: 268 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0188.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:32
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Is it possible to conceive of a Hello Kitty Middle Ages or a Tickle Me Elmo Renaissance? The Oxford English Dictionary dates the first reference to “cute” in the sense of “attractive, pretty, charming” to 1834. More recently, Sianne Ngai has offered a critical overview of the cuteness of the twentieth-century avant-garde within the context of consumer culture. But if cuteness can get under the skin, what kinds of surfaces does it best infiltrate, particularly in the framework of historical forms, events, and objects that traditionally have been read as emergences around “big” aesthetics of formal symmetries, high affects, and resemblances? The Retrofuturism of Cuteness seeks to undo the temporal strictures surrounding aesthetic and affective categories, to displace a strict focus on commodification and cuteness, and to interrogate how cuteness as a minor aesthetics can refocus our perceptions and readings of both premodern and modern media, literature, and culture. Taking seriously the retro and the futuristic temporalities of cuteness, this volume puts in conversation projects that have unearthed remnants of a “cult of cute”—positioned historically and critically in between transitions into secularization, capitalist frameworks of commodification, and the enchantment of objects—and those that have investigated the uncanny haunting of earlier aesthetics in future-oriented modes of cuteness.

Crush

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9780615978956 Year: Pages: 120 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0063.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Social Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:42
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

In Crush, a stunning collection of erotic poems and queer meditations delineating Stockton’ and Gilson’s mutual crushing on each other, but also all of the ways in which, sweetly and also sadly, affection ameliorates the anguishes that, despite our deepest devotions, are never constant, Stockton and Gilson write, In Aranye Fradenburg’s words, Shakespeare’s sonnets describe “the love you feel for inappropriate objects: for someone thirty years older, thirty years younger. The kind of love that makes a fool, a pervert, a stalker out of you.” Let’s start here, for much of this description applies to Petrarchan conventions as well. Let’s start here, with this affective entrance into the poems and the impossibility of dispossessing the other’s voice in the manufacture of one’s own machine. Let’s start here, with a vision of poems as indexes of crushes rendered inappropriate, unhealthy by some gradation of difference and level of intensity. With the question of what distinguishes a crush from love if both turn you into a different self. Under oak trees and sunlight, in coffee shops and locker rooms, steam rooms and seminar rooms, and in conversation with Milton, Shakespeare, Frank O’Hara, Narcissus, Allen Ginsberg, Jacques Derrida, Aranye Fradenburg, Mary Magdalene, Freud, Oscar Wilde, José Esteban Muñoz, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Elton John, and Prince, among other poets, harlots, saints, and scholars, Stockton and Gilson explore the ways in which friendship, desire, falling, swerving, possession, holding, faggoting, falling, longing, poeming, and crushing open the self to queerly utopic, if also difficult, deflections — other, more improbable modes of being, as Foucault might have said.

As If: Essays in As You Like It

Author:
ISBN: 9780615988177 Year: Pages: 136 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0162.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Languages and Literatures
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:34
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

Shakespeare’s As You Like It is a play without a theme. Instead, it repeatedly poses one question in a variety of forms: What if the world were other than it is? As You Like It is a set of experiments in which its characters conditionally change an aspect of their world and see what comes of it: what if I were not a girl but a man? What if I were not a duke, but someone like Robin Hood? What if I were a deer? “What would you say to me now an [that is, “if”] I were your very, very Rosalind?” (4.1.64-65). “Much virtue in ‘if’,” as one of its characters declares near the play’s end; ‘if’ is virtual. It releases force even if the force is not that of what is the case. Change one thing in the world, the play asks, and how else does everything change? In As You Like It, unlike Shakespeare’s other plays, the characters themselves are both experiment and experimenters. They assert something about the world that they know is not the case, and their fictions let them explore what would happen if it were—and not only if it were, but something, not otherwise apparent, about how it is now. What is as you like it? What is it that you, or anyone, really likes or wants? The characters of As You Like It stand in ‘if’ as at a hinge of thought and action, conscious that they desire something, not wholly capable of getting it, not even able to say what it is. Their awareness that the world could be different than it is, is a step towards making it something that they wish it to be, and towards learning what that would be.

Schönheit ― Der Körper als Kunstprodukt

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9783496015932 Year: Pages: 374 DOI: https://doi.org/10.11588/arthistoricum.425 Language: German
Publisher: Reimer Verlag
Added to DOAB on : 2020-05-14 10:01:31
License:

Loading...
Export citation

Choose an application

Abstract

[English version below]
Seit der Antike wurden immer neue Kunstgriffe ersonnen, um den menschlichen Körper an sich und in seiner künstlerischen Darstellung zu perfektionieren. Der Band versammelt Texte, die dieses Streben nach Schönheit bezeugen, von dessen Anfängen bis zum Ende des 18. Jahrhunderts. Spätestens seit der antiken Erzählung von der schönen Helena gilt körperliche Schönheit als ein Kunstprodukt: Für sein Bildnis der Helena soll der griechische Maler Zeuxis die fünf hervorragendsten Jungfrauen ausgewählt und von jedem Modell den jeweils schönsten Körperteil gemalt haben. Nach dieser Vorstellung ist vollkommene Schönheit erst durch einen künstlichen Eingriff zu erzielen. Kunst und Körperpflege stehen damit in einem spannungsvollen Wechselverhältnis. Denn die Grundlagen und Mittel zur Erzeugung und Steigerung von körperlicher Schönheit, die in beiden Bereichen zur Verfügung stehen, überschneiden, ergänzen und beeinflussen sich. Das Buch beleuchtet dieses Wechselverhältnis anhand ausgewählter Grundlagentexte, allesamt in deutscher Übersetzung, ergänzt um fundierte Kommentare zum historischen Kontext.

For many centuries, new tricks have been devised to perfect the human body itself and in its artistic representation. The volume brings together texts that testify to this striving for beauty, from its beginnings to the end of the 18th century.
For his portrait of Helena, believed to be the most beautiful woman in the Ancient world, the Greek painter Zeuxis is said to have selected the five most outstanding virgins and to have painted the most beautiful body part of each model. According to this idea, transmitted by Ovid, perfect beauty can only be achieved through an artificial intervention. Art and personal hygiene are thus in an exciting interrelation. Because the basics and means of creating and enhancing physical beauty, which are available in both areas, overlap, complement and influence each other. The book illuminates this interrelation using selected basic texts, all in German translation, supplemented by well-founded comments on the historical context.

Listing 1 - 7 of 7
Sort by
Narrow your search