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Potentials of disorder: Explaining conflict and stability in the Caucasus and in the former Yugoslavia

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9780719062414 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Manchester University Press
Subject: Political Science
Added to DOAB on : 2011-11-04 00:00:00
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The Caucasus and the Balkan region are almost automatically associated with conflict and war. At the core of these struggles lies the quest for a new institutional relationship between territory, the state and ethnic groups. Both regions share a similar historical and institutional legacy which must be regarded as having paved the ground for a rise in ethno-nationalism. There is, as a result, wide potential for conflict in both regions. However, similar structural conditions do not always turn into violent conflicts. Rapid institutional change, as occuring in the former Yugoslavia and the former Soviet Union, can lead to new institutional arrangements on smaller scales - which may in turn provide stability in inter-group relations and border management. Therefore, it is of vital importance to the study of conflict analysis to identify what conditions foster new orders, and what factors, actors and institutions are necessary to create a stable equilibrium in intra- and inter-group conflicts. This book brings together a selection of case studies and theoretical approaches aimed at identifying the institutions which prevented or fostered escalation of conflict in the Caucasus and former Yugoslavia, and, will be of great benefit to students of these topics.

Keywords

balkan --- yugoslavia --- caucasus

History of Yugoslavia

Authors: ---
Book Series: Central European Studies ISBN: 9781557538383 9781557538499 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Purdue University Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 102989
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2019-07-03 11:21:05
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Why did Yugoslavia fall apart? Was its violent demise inevitable? Did its population simply fall victim to the lure of nationalism? How did this multinational state survive for so long, and where do we situate the short life of Yugoslavia in the long history of Europe in the twentieth century? The Complete History of Yugoslavia by Marie-Janine Calic provides a concise, accessible, comprehensive synthesis of the political, cultural, social, and economic life of Yugoslavia—from its nineteenth-century South Slavic origins to the bloody demise of the multinational state of Yugoslavia in the 1990s.

Keywords

History --- Yugoslavia --- Balkans

Vampires and a Reasonable Dictionary

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9780692022238 Year: Pages: 186 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0076.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Sports Science
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:41
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As a follow-up to their first collaboration Repetitions (published in Belgrade in 1994, and in English by punctum in 2013), in 2008 the authors published, also in Belgrade, Vampiri & Razumni recnik, published here by punctum as Vampires & A Reasonable Dictionary. Vampires is Radaković’s fictionalized account of a Serb living in Cologne, Germany while his former country disintegrates. He travels in the American West, ostensibly looking for the vampires causing chaos in his own country, and then returns to Europe, having found no vampires. It is a dark text, a story of destruction told in a narrative that refuses all the solaces narrative has traditionally afforded. A Reasonable Dictionary is Abbott’s personally troubled account of his and Radaković’s trip up the Drina River between the civil wars, a journey made with the novelist Peter Handke, a trip during which some of Abbott’s specifically American stories lost their moral structure.

Repetitions

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9780615851334 Year: Pages: 124 DOI: 10.21983/P3.0039.1.00 Language: English
Publisher: punctum books
Subject: Sports Science
Added to DOAB on : 2019-06-12 09:24:43
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In 1994, after following a character in Peter Handke’s novel Repetition into what is now Slovenia and after traveling in landscapes of Handke’s youth, Žarko Radaković and Scott Abbott published a two-headed text in Belgrade, Ponavljane, now published in English by punctum as Repetitions. The possibility of narration in two voices, complicated by the third voice that is Peter Handke’s own narrator, is the main focus of deliberation while traveling and reading and writing. Repetitions begins with Abbott’s text, a fairly straightforward travel narrative. It ends with Radaković’s account of the same events, much less straightforward, more repetitious, more adventuresome. Two aspects make the double-book unique. First, it represents experiences shared by two authors whose native languages are Serbian and English respectively (German is their only common language). The authors’ perspectives contrast with and supplement one another: Radaković grew up in Tito’s Yugoslavia and Abbott comes from the Mormon American West; Radaković is the translator of most of Peter Handke’s works into Serbo-Croatian and Abbott translated Handke’s provocative A Journey to the Rivers: Justice for Serbia for Viking Press and his play Voyage by Dugout: The Play of the Film of the War for PAJ (Performing Arts Journal); Radaković was a journalist for Deutsche Welle in Cologne and Abbott is a professor of German literature at Utah Valley University; Radaković is the author of several novels and Abbott has published mostly literary-critical work; and so on. Two sets of eyes. Two pens. Two visions of the world.

Chapter 1. Brothers United (Book chapter)

Book title: Nations and Citizens in Yugoslavia and the Post-Yugoslav States

Author:
ISBN: 9781474221559 Year: Pages: 25-36 DOI: 10.5040/9781474221559.ch-002 Language: English
Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic Grant: H2020 European Research Council - 230239
Subject: Political Science --- Social Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2018-01-31 11:01:44
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Chapter 1 shows the historical trajectory of the idea that South Slavs as linguistic and cultural ‘brothers’ should form a single nation and establish their own national state. The state came into being after the First World War when citizens of different pre-war entities (empires and kingdoms) came together to form a political community. The attempts to make it viable and functional proved difficult. Chapter 1 shows competing ideas about Yugoslav political unification that directly affected citizenship as well as citizens’ relationship with the new state: unitarism vs federalism; one nation vs many nations; common vs multinational culture; monarchy vs republic. It shows how the first citizenship regime was created on a unitary basis and why it came in existence almost 10 years after the creation of the state. It portrays a crisis-ridden country and a fragile community within which communists as a new political force will emerge with their own vision how to transform Yugoslavia. The revolver came from Serbia, but the finger that pulled the trigger that would kill Franz Ferdinand and thus announce the end of one world and the birth of another acted upon two strong beliefs. If one can judge from his statement, underage Gavrilo Princip, like so many of his peers, was foremost convinced that South Slavs should be liberated from a foreign yoke and unite in their own state; this belief was strongly though not articulately mixed with another conviction that the world about to come must be the world of profound social transformation. Two motives with which our story of ‘one hundred years of citizenship’ begins will be repeated in many different forms during this century: should South Slavs have their own common state? Or form separate ones? And, regardless of the answer, should political transformations entail more social equality or only a change of the rulers at the top of the existing hierarchy? Every idea often has deep roots and various historic materializations. One of the two ideas that materialized in that finger that eventually pulled the trigger on 28 June 1914 had started its long voyage to Sarajevo almost a century before.

Bigbít nebo turbofolk: Představy migrantů z bývalé Jugoslávie

Author:
ISBN: 9788090509849 Year: Pages: 155 Language: Czech
Publisher: AntropoWeb
Subject: History --- Ethnology
Added to DOAB on : 2014-04-28 16:36:27
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This book is dedicated to the imagination of migrant communities from former Yugoslavia. It contextualizes their imagination in relation to the history, space and culture of Yugoslavia. Its empirical basis is grounded in the contemporary history of the migration from former Yugoslavia. The first part of the work deals with the methodology and theory relevant to the case studies. Besides the theory of imagination originating in the thought of Émile Durkheim, Cornelius Castoriadis, Benedict Anderson and Arjun Appadurai. I have also focused on the theory of popular culture, quoting its founding thinkers related to the Birmingham school of Centre of contemporary Cultural Studies, as well as John Fiske and the parallel culture- -driven research of Pierre Bourdieu and Michel de Certeau. The theoretical framework of this book generally relates to Marxism, and the works of Antonio Gramsci, David Harvey, Immanuel Wallerstein, Slavoj Žižek and others. The methodology of this book is closely inspired by the anthropological tradition of participant observation. The primary sources are heterogeneous and partly issue from the narration of the informants during several in-depth interviews as well as from narration, edited either by the different institutions of the host-country or the by editors based in the home-country. The second part of the book provides a historical and geographical context for the case studies that follow. It presents the contemporary history of migration from the western Balkans starting at the beginning of the 20th century as cross border migrations following patterns of industrial modernisation. The economic migrations of the working classes were supplemented by migrations of members of the intellectual elites who chose merely symbolic destinations for emigration. However, the core-periphery of primarily economic relations of the world-system as identified by Immanuel Wallerstein remained unchanged even by this symbolic logic. Migrations during the second half of the 20th century are presented in more detail. The political turmoil of 1941-1948 which established the Yugoslav Socialist Federation in its position between the two blocs and this point is the essential contextual reference of this book. During the socialist years in Yugoslavia we may identify two main motives of migration – economic and political. These may somehow relate to the previous histories of popular and elite emigration but under the new political regime it changed substantially. These two motives are part of the establishment of specific segments of migrants and their interrelations. Starting from the early 1960s the economic motive of migration gave rise to the phenomenon of Gastatbajteri (guest-workers) that changed the social and cultural landscape of former Yugoslavia, and together with it also many cities of Western European and other host-countries. However, the frontier between the two types of migrants (political and economic) is not completely defined and in many cases the two motives coincided. The coincidence of the political and economic motives for migration may also be visible during and after the break-up of Yugoslavia. In this part of the book I cover the history of the 1990s refugee migrations that were often linked to the local practice of ethnic homogenization conducted by all parties involved in the series of conflicts. Besides, many migrants from regions that were not directly involved in the war used the possibility to obtain refugee status to escape the economic, social and intellectual downturn of the successor countries of former Yugoslavia. Here, the basic theoretical distinction between voluntary and involuntary migrations is discussed arguing that practically no migration is voluntary and should the migrants be completely free to choose, many would prefer to stay at home. Three host countries of migrants from former Yugoslavia are presented more in detail: France, Austria and the Czech Republic. Each of these countries has its specificities in the world-system and also in relation to migrations from former Yugoslavia. Differences and similarities among them are presented in relation to the different segments of migrants crystallised either according to their ethno-confessional/political background and/or motive of migration. Different segments of migrants from former Yugoslavia are formed around different memory-systems. As a first case study I present politics of memory linked to two lieux de mémoire – one in France (Villefranche-de-Rouergue) and one in Austria (Bleiburg). By coincidence both are important in particular for memories of migrants of Croatian origin. The two memorials however, present completely opposing views of national history. Villefranche- de-Rouergue is a symbol for Croatian antifacist resistance and Bleiburg a symbol for the retreat of collaborationist forces of the pro-Nazi puppet Independent state of Croatia. Both of these memorials however, form an example of political memory that even if on the first sight seems contradictory, is by definition syncretic. If the first case study deals with history and memory the second one completes it with the examination of the space dimension. Here I present different images linked to space that surrounded migrants from former Yugoslavia in their host-countries and I discuss also memories of spaces and places in the home-country. I identify three such images – Road, Landscape and Motherland. Based on these images I propose redesigning the nostalgic cartographies of migrants from those presenting world-views of the external researchers (nostalgia of multiculturalism) to those specifically declared by migrants (nostalgia of Home). The third case study is the one that is the most similar in form to most Cultural and Subcultural studies and deals in detail with imagination linked to music. Here, similar to the politics of memory, different segments of migrants are confronted with rock and folk music as well as with a specific local variety of pop-folk. Furthermore, patriotic and electronic music are discussed as well as the topic of Balkanism in cinematography and the communication of ethnic origins on French internet websites.

Introduction (Book chapter)

Book title: Nations and Citizens in Yugoslavia and the Post-Yugoslav States

Author:
ISBN: 9781474221559 Year: Pages: 1-22 DOI: 10.5040/9781474221559.ch-001 Language: English
Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic Grant: H2020 European Research Council - 230239
Subject: Political Science --- Social Sciences
Added to DOAB on : 2018-01-31 11:01:46
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The introductory chapter explains why Yugoslavia and the post-Yugoslav region, due to frequent constitutional changes, provides such an interesting and insightful example for studying modern politics and it shows why citizenship offers necessary lenses to understand political and social processes. It explains what do we mean by citizenship, in theory and practice, and why we introduce a heuristic concept of citizenship regime that encompasses legal and administrative side of inclusion and exclusion, social and political dynamic of membership and the influence of ideologies and everyday experiences of citizenship. The introduction shows the â&#128;&#152;citizenship gapâ&#128;&#153; in the literature covering the former Yugoslavia, the ideological conflicts over the concept and its practices and their inexplicable marginalization in the scholarship focused on the construction and, mostly, destruction of Yugoslavia. It also defines modern citizenship as a tool for various political and social purposes in this region over the last century. A study of transformations of citizenship represents thus an alternative political history of Yugoslavia and the post-Yugoslav states.

Hitler – Beneš – Tito

Authors: --- ---
ISBN: 9783700173090 Year: Pages: 306 Seiten DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_461692 Language: German
Publisher: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften Grant: Austrian Science Fund - PUB 52
Added to DOAB on : 2013-12-15 10:04:55
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Communities of conflict within Austrian-Hungary (especially in Bohemian and south Slav lands); the domestic and foreign policies of Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia in the interwar-period; the Nazi policies of conquest and occupation in Bohemia, Moravia, Serbia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Slovenia, finalliy the issue of history and memory east and west of the Iron Curtan.

The Nonconformists

Author:
ISBN: 9789639776135 9786155211362 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Central European University Press
Subject: Anthropology
Added to DOAB on : 2015-05-19 15:18:48
License: OpenEdition licence for Books

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Serbia’s national movement of the 1980s and 1990s, the author suggests, was not the product of an ancient, immutable, and aggressive Serbian national identity; nor was it an artificial creation of powerful political actors looking to capitalize on its mobilizing power. Miller argues that cultural processes are too often ignored in favor of political ones; that Serbian intellectuals did work within a historical context, but that they were not slaves to the past. His subjects are Dobrica Ćosić ...

A People's History of the Second World War

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ISBN: 9780745328034 9781849647199 9781849647205 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Pluto Press Grant: Knowledge Unlatched - 100869
Subject: History
Added to DOAB on : 2018-01-25 11:01:48
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A People's History of the Second World War unearths the fascinating history of the war as fought 'from below'. Until now, the vast majority of historical accounts have focussed on the conflict between the Allied and Axis powers for imperialist mastery. Donny Gluckstein shows that in fact between 1939 and 1945 two distinct wars were fought – one ‘from above’ and one ‘from below’. Using examples from countries under the Nazi heel, in the colonies and within the Axis and Allied camps, Gluckstein brings to life the very different struggle of the people's and resistance movements which proliferated during the war. He shows how they fought not just fascism, but colonialism and empire, and were betrayed by the Allies at the war’s end. This book will fundamentally challenge our understanding of the Second World War – both about the people who fought it and the reasons for which it was fought.

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