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Autophagy in plants and algae

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889194773 Year: Pages: 102 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-477-3 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Botany --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-03-10 08:14:33
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Autophagy (also known as macroautophagy) is an evolutionarily conserved process by which cytoplasmic components are nonselectively enclosed within a double-membrane vesicle known as the autophagosome and delivered to the vacuole for degradation of toxic components and recycling of needed nutrients. This catabolic process is required for the adequate adaptation and response of the cell, and correspondingly the whole organism, to different types of stress including nutrient starvation or oxidative damage. Autophagy has been extensively investigated in yeasts and mammals but the identification of autophagy-related (ATG) genes in plant and algal genomes together with the characterization of autophagy-deficient mutants in plants have revealed that this process is structurally and functionally conserved in photosynthetic eukaryotes. Recent studies have demonstrated that autophagy is active at a basal level under normal growth in plants and is upregulated during senescence and in response to nutrient limitation, oxidative stress, salt and drought conditions and pathogen attack. Autophagy was initially considered as a non-selective pathway, but numerous observations mainly obtained in yeasts revealed that autophagy can also selectively eliminate specific proteins, protein complexes and organelles. Interestingly, several types of selective autophagy appear to be also conserved in plants, and the degradation of protein aggregates through specific adaptors or the delivery of chloroplast material to the vacuole via autophagy has been reported. This research topic aims to gather recent progress on different aspects of autophagy in plants and algae. We welcome all types of articles including original research, methods, opinions and reviews that provide new insights about the autophagy process and its regulation.

The unfolded protein response in virus infections

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889193974 Year: Pages: 129 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-397-4 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Microbiology --- Botany
Added to DOAB on : 2015-12-03 13:02:24
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Unfolded protein response (UPR) is a cellular adaptive response for restoring endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis in response to ER stress. Perturbation of the UPR and failure to restore ER homeostasis inevitably leads to diseases. It has now become evident that perturbation of the UPR is the cause of many important human diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases, cystic fibrosis, diabetes and cancer. It has recently emerged that virus infections can trigger the UPR but the relationship between virus infections and host UPR is intriguing. On one hand, UPR is harmful to the virus and virus has developed means to subvert the UPR. On the other hand, virus exploits the host UPR to assist in its own infection, gene expression, establishment of persistence, reactivation from latency and to evade the immune response. When this delicate balance of virus-host UPR interaction is broken down, it may cause diseases. This is particularly challenging for viruses that establish a chronic infection to maintain this balance. Each virus interacts with the host UPR in a different way to suit their life style and how the virus interacts with the host UPR can define the characteristic of a particular virus infection. Understanding how a particular virus interacts with the host UPR may pave the way to the design of a new class of anti-viral that targets this particular pathway to skew the response towards anti-virus. This knowledge can also be translated into the clinics to help re-design oncolytic virotherapy and gene therapy. In this research topic we aimed to compile a collection of focused review articles, original research articles, commentary, opinion, hypothesis and methods to highlight the current advances in this burgeoning area of research, in an attempt to provide an in-depth understanding of how viruses interact with the host UPR, which may be beneficial to the future combat of viral and human diseases.

Liver Myofibroblasts

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889199891 Year: Pages: 99 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-989-1 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Physiology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-01-19 14:05:46
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Myofibroblasts (MFB) are found in most tissues of the body. They have the matrix-producing functions of fibroblasts and contractile properties that are known from smooth muscle cells. Fundamental work of the last decades has shed remarkable light on their origin, biological functions and role in disease. During hepatic injury, they fulfill manifold functions in connective tissue remodeling and wound healing, but overshooting activity of MFB on the other side induces fibrosis and cirrhosis. The present e-book "Liver myofibroblasts" contains 9 articles providing comprehensive information on "hot topics" of MFB. In our opening editorial we provide a short overview of the origin of MFB and their relevance in extracellular matrix formation which is the hallmark of hepatic fibrosis. Thereafter, leading experts in the field share their current perspectives on special topics of (i) MFB in development and disease, ii) their role in hepatic fibrogenesis, and (iii) promising therapies and targets that are suitable to interfere with hepatic fibrosis.

The Origin of the Plasma Cell Heterogeneity

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889197347 Year: Pages: 80 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-734-7 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Allergy and Immunology --- Medicine (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-04-07 11:22:02
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Plasma cells (PCs) are terminally differentiated B-cells producing large amounts of immunoglobulins (Ig). In humans, most of circulating Ig are produced by bone marrow plasma cells. PCs differentiate from activated naïve or memory B-cells usually activated by specific antigens. It is still controversial whether the regulation of PCs numbers and the “active” in vivo Ig diversity depend or not on non-specific reactivation of B-cells during infections. Depending on the stimulus (T-independent/T-dependent antigen, cytokines, partner cells) and B-cell types (naïve or memory, circulating or germinal center, lymph nodes or spleen, B1 or B2...), both the phenotype and isotype of PCs differ suggesting that PC diversity is either linked to B-cell diversity or to the type of stimulus or to both. Knowledge of the mechanisms supporting PC diversity has important consequences for the management of i) plasma cell neoplasia such as Multiple Myeloma and Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia, ii) vaccine protection against pathogens and iii) auto-immune diseases.

Keywords

Plasma cell --- B-cell --- differentiation --- Cell Cycle --- IL21 --- Autophagy --- B1 --- Autoimmunity --- Myeloma

Immunomodulatory Effects of Drugs for Treatment of Immune-Related Diseases

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889452880 Year: Pages: 108 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-288-0 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Allergy and Immunology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-02-27 16:16:44
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More than 90% of diseases possess immunological abnormalities. Disorders such as inflammation, hypersensitivity, autoimmunity and immunodeficiency are simple examples of how the immune system misinterprets its surroundings and goes awry. Multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, inflammatory bowel diseases, among many others are manifestations of immune cells attacking normal tissues. On the other hand, damping the immune system leads to diseases such as cancer, AIDS, and severe combined immunodeficiency. The last ten years witnessed an explosion in developing drugs that target the immune system. Several novel monoclonal antibodies have been approved for treatment of various diseases confirming that personalized medicine approach is robust in combating diseases. Hence, the future holds great promise for using personalized and targeted medicine rather than generalized medications that, in most circumstances, proven to be ineffective and characteristically exert side effects. Approaches such as generating novel adjuvants that can stimulate the immune system without harmful side effects, targeting inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, harnessing and activating innate immune cells such as natural killer cells or dendritic cells, are examples of future approaches to treat autoimmune diseases, AIDS, and various forms of cancer resulting from chronic inflammation. More recently, targeting immune checkpoint molecules have shown therapeutic response against lung cancer and melanoma. Identifying molecules involved in autophagy is another example of how personalized medicine might help treat patients with refractory asthma and autoimmune diseases. This topic introduces the reader to these novel approaches of manipulating the immune system and developing targeted therapeutic strategies for treatment of various diseases.

Self-Eating on Demand: Autophagy in Cancer and Cancer Therapy

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889454228 Year: Pages: 111 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-422-8 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Oncology
Added to DOAB on : 2018-11-16 17:17:57
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Macroautophagy, the major lysosomal pathway for recycling intracellular components including whole organelles, has emerged as a key process modulating tumorigenesis, tumor–stroma interactions, and cancer therapy. An impressive number of studies over the past decade have unraveled the plastic role of autophagy during tumor development and dissemination. The discoveries that autophagy may either support or repress neoplastic growth and contextually favor or weaken resistance and impact antitumor immunity have spurred efforts from many laboratories trying to conceptualize the complex role of autophagy in cancer using cellular and preclinical models. This complexity is further accentuated by recent findings highlighting that various autophagy-related genes have roles beyond this catabolic mechanism and interface with oncogenic pathways, other trafficking and degradation mechanisms and the cell death machinery. From a therapeutic perspective, knowledge of how autophagy modulates the tumor microenvironment is crucial to devise autophagy-targeting strategies using smart combination of drugs or anticancer modalities. This eBook contains a collection of reviews by autophagy researchers and provides a background to the state-of-the-art in the field of autophagy in cancer, focusing on various aspects of autophagy regulation ranging from its molecular components to its cell autonomous role, e.g. in cell division and oncogenesis, miRNAs regulation, cross-talk with cell death pathways as well as cell non-autonomous role, e.g. in secretion, interface with tumor stroma and clinical prospects of autophagy-based biomarkers and autophagy modulators in anticancer therapy. This eBook is part of the TransAutophagy initiative to better understand the clinical implications of autophagy in cancer.

Protein Quality Controlling Systems in Plant Responses to Environmental Stresses

Authors: --- --- --- --- et al.
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889455584 Year: Pages: 214 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-558-4 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Botany
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:42
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Environmental stress factors negatively affect plant growth by inducing proteins dysfunction. As coping strategies, plant have developed a comprehensive protein quality controlling system (PQCS) to keep proteins homeostasis. In this research topic of “Protein Quality Controlling Systems in Plant Responses to Environmental Stresses”, some latest researches and opinions in this field, including heat shock proteins (HSPs), unfolded protein response (UPR), ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy, were reported, aiming to provide novel insights for increasing crop production under environmental challenges.

Redox and Metabolic Circuits in Cancer

Authors: --- --- ---
Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889456352 Year: Pages: 183 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-635-2 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Oncology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:43
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Living cells require a constant supply of energy for the orchestration of a variety of biological processes in fluctuating environmental conditions. In heterotrophic organisms, energy mainly derives from the oxidation of carbohydrates and lipids, whose chemical bonds breakdown allows electrons to generate ATP and to provide reducing equivalents needed to restore the antioxidant systems and prevent from damage induced by reactive oxygen and nitric oxide (NO)-derived species (ROS and RNS). Studies of the last two decades have highlighted that cancer cells reprogram the metabolic circuitries in order to sustain their high growth rate, invade other tissues, and escape death. Therefore, this broad metabolic reorganization is mandatory for neoplastic growth, allowing the generation of adequate amounts of ATP and metabolites, as well as the optimization of redox homeostasis in the changeable environmental conditions of the tumor mass. Among these, ROS, as well as NO and RNS, which are produced at high extent in the tumor microenvironment or intracellularly, have been demonstrated acting as positive modulators of cell growth and frequently associated with malignant phenotype. Metabolic changes are also emerging as primary drivers of neoplastic onset and growth, and alterations of mitochondrial metabolism and homeostasis are emerging as pivotal in driving tumorigenesis.Targeting the metabolic rewiring, as well as affecting the balance between production and scavenging of ROS and NO-derived species, which underpin cancer growth, opens the possibility of finding selective and effective anti-neoplastic approaches, and new compounds affecting metabolic and/or redox adaptation of cancer cells are emerging as promising chemotherapeutic tools.In this Research Topic we have elaborated on all these aspects and provided our contribution to this increasingly growing field of research with new results, opinions and general overviews about the extraordinary plasticity of cancer cells to change metabolism and redox homeostasis in order to overcome the adverse conditions and sustain their “individualistic” behavior under a teleonomic viewpoint.

Pathophysiological Mechanisms of Sarcopenia in Aging and in Muscular Dystrophy: A Translational Approach

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889196845 Year: Pages: 248 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-684-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Neurology --- Science (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2016-04-07 11:22:02
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Loss of muscle mass and increased fibrosis characterize both sarcopenia of aging and muscular dystrophy. Research is increasingly showing that these two conditions also share several pathophysiological mechanisms, including mitochondrial dysfunction, increased apoptosis, abnormal modulation of autophagy, decline in satellite cells, increased generation of reactive oxygen species, and abnormal regulation of signaling and stress response pathways. This Research Topic will cover several mechanisms involved in aging and dystrophic sarcopenia and explore the therapeutic potential of various strategies for intervention.

Pattern recognition receptors and cancer

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889196746 Year: Pages: 201 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88919-674-6 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Medicine (General) --- Allergy and Immunology
Added to DOAB on : 2016-08-16 10:34:25
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The group of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) includes families of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), NOD-like receptors (NLRs), C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), and AIM-2-like receptors (ALRs). Conceptually, receptors constituting these families are united by two general features. Firstly, they directly recognize common antigen determinants of virtually all classes of pathogens (so-called pathogen-associated molecular patterns, or simply PAMPs) and initiate immune response against them via specific intracellular signaling pathways. Secondly, they recognize endogenous ligands (since they are usually released during cell stress, they are called damage-associated molecular patterns, DAMPs), and, hence, PRR-mediated immune response can be activated without an influence of infectious agents. So, pattern recognition receptors play the key role performing the innate and adaptive immune response. In addition, many PRRs have a number of other vital functions apart from participation in immune response realization. The fundamental character and diversity of PRR functions have led to amazingly rapid research in this field. Such investigations are very promising for medicine as immune system plays a key role in vast majority if not all human diseases, and the process of discovering the new aspects of the immune system functioning is rapidly ongoing. The role of Toll-like receptors in cancer was analyzed in certain reviews but the data are still scattered. This collection of reviews systematizes the key information in the field.

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