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The end of Irish history?: Reflections on the Celtic Tiger

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ISBN: 9780719062308 Year: Language: English
Publisher: Manchester University Press
Subject: Economics
Added to DOAB on : 2011-11-04 00:00:00
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Abstract

Ireland appears to be in the throes of a remarkable process of social change. Over the last decade, the apparently inescapable status of the twenty-six counties as an economic casualty has been dramatically reversed. In recent years, it has become commonplace for the Irish Republic to register formal rates of economic growth that are the envy of every other western European state. The purpose of this exciting new book is to systematically scrutinise the interpretations and prescriptions that inform the deceptively simple metaphor of the 'Celtic Tiger'. The standpoint of the book is that a more critical approach to the course of development being followed by the Republic is urgently required. The essays collected here set out to expose the fallacies that drive the fashionable rhetoris of Tigerhood. Four of these fallacies - that Ireland has cast off the chains of economic dependency, that everyone is benefiting from the economic recovery, that personal freedom and liberty are at an unprecedented level for all citizens, and that Ireland is also experiencing a period of strong cultural renaissance - are vigorously challenged. An esteemed list of contributors deal with issues such as immigration, women's issues, globalisation, and changing economic and social conditions. This book will be essential reading for all students of modern Ireland.

Keywords

economy --- ireland --- celtic --- irish

Chapter 2: ‘Celtic Spells and Counterspells’ from Book: Understanding Celtic Religion: Revisiting the Pagan Past

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Book Series: New Approaches to Celtic Religion and Mythology ISBN: 9781783167920 Year: DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.16922/1783167920-02 Language: English
Publisher: University of Wales Press
Subject: Religion
Added to DOAB on : 2015-10-27 16:09:11
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This is a chapter from Understanding Celtic Religion: Revisiting the Pagan Past, edited by Katja Ritari and Alexandra Bergholm. Although it has long been acknowledged that the early Irish literary corpus preserves both pre-Christian and Christian elements, the challenges involved in the understanding of these different strata have not been subjected to critical examination. This volume draws attention to the importance of reconsidering the relationship between religion and mythology, as well as the concept of ‘Celtic religion’ itself. When scholars are attempting to construct the so-called ‘Celtic’ belief system, what counts as ‘religion’? Or, when labelling something as ‘religion’ as opposed to ‘mythology’, what do these entities entail? This volume is the first interdisciplinary collection of articles which critically reevaluates the methodological challenges of the study of ‘Celtic religion’; the authors are eminent scholars in the field of Celtic Studies representing the disciplines of theology, literary studies, history, law and archaeology, and the book represents a significant contribution to the present scholarly debate concerning the pre-Christian elements in early medieval source materials.

Keywords

celtic --- religion --- pagan --- past --- mythology

Keltische Theonymie, Kulte, interpretatio

Authors: ---
ISBN: 9783700173694 Year: Pages: 274 Seiten DOI: 10.26530/OAPEN_451552 Language: French|Spanish;
Publisher: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften Grant: Austrian Science Fund - PUB 87
Added to DOAB on : 2013-08-16 18:46:34
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This tenth volume appearing within the framework of the OEAW interdisciplinary research- project Fontes epigraphici religionum Celticarum antiquarum increases our understanding of several aspects of the religious traditions handed down by Celtic-speaking populations, from Britain and the Iberian Peninsula to ancient Italy and Dacia, all through the Gauls and the Germaniae.This tenth volume appearing within the framework of the OEAW interdisciplinary research- project Fontes epigraphici religionum Celticarum antiquarum increases our understanding of several aspects of the religious traditions handed down by Celtic-speaking populations, from Britain and the Iberian Peninsula to ancient Italy and Dacia, all through the Gauls and the Germaniae.G. Bauchhenss corrects some preconceived notions about iconography; F. Burillo Mozota, J. A. Arenas Esteban and M. P. Burillo Cuadrado investigate the cultural context of an astronomic platform at Segeda; P. Scherrer puts the nautae Parisiaci pillar on a new hermeneutical basis; N. Gavrilović looks for Celtic speakers in Eastern Europe. J. Gorrochategui, M. C. González Rodríguez, P. Lajoye offer partly revised readings of several votive inscriptions and divine names while P. Y. Lambert, B. Rémy, X. Delamarre analyse theonymical epithets in different ways and N. Beck scrutinizes the relationship between deities and ethnics. P. de Bernardo Stempel discusses the transformations to be observed in a provincial pantheon from the first Celtic inscriptions to the latest Roman ones; W. Spickermann questions the continuity between Pre-Roman and Romano-Celtic religion; A. Hofeneder follows the trail of an Old Celtic and later syncretic deity up to the Imperial Roman historical tradition. M. Hainzmann and P. de Bernardo Stempel present – with the help of numerous and easy understandable tables – an innovative systematization of the various syncretic phenomena known as Interpretatio, whose geographic diversity is pointed out by F. Marco Simón.

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