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Building Strategies for Porcine Cancer Models

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Book Series: Frontiers Research Topics ISSN: 16648714 ISBN: 9782889456505 Year: Pages: 75 DOI: 10.3389/978-2-88945-650-5 Language: English
Publisher: Frontiers Media SA
Subject: Science (General) --- Genetics
Added to DOAB on : 2019-01-23 14:53:43
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The eBook "Building Strategies for Porcine Cancer Models" presents a series of articles demonstrating the state-of-the-art developments in pig models for cancer research. Renowned researchers dedicated to the reproduction, genomic and biological engineering of the pig model for biomedicine contribute to this special research area. Although advances in these areas are occurring at surprising speeds, they are still far from realizing all the potential benefits that this biological model could provide to science. The current biomedical models may limit the frontier of knowledge in the cancer research.

Abiotic Stress Effects on Performance of Horticultural Crops

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ISBN: 9783039217502 / 9783039217519 Year: Volume: 1 Pages: 126 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-751-9 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology --- Agriculture (General)
Added to DOAB on : 2019-11-05 10:43:33
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Horticultural crop yield and quality depend on genotype, environmental conditions, and production management. In particular, adverse environmental conditions may greatly affect crop performance, reducing crop yield by 50%–70%. Abiotic stresses such as cold, heat, drought, flooding, salinity, nutrient deficiency, and ultraviolet radiation affect multiple physiological and biochemical mechanisms in plants as they attempt to cope with the stress conditions. However, different crop species can have different sensitivities or tolerances to specific abiotic stresses. Tolerant plants may activate different strategies to adapt to or avoid the negative effect of abiotic stresses. At the physiological level, photosynthetic activity and light-use efficiency of plants may be modulated to enhance tolerance against the stress. At the biochemical level, several antioxidant systems may be activated, and many enzymes may produce stress-related metabolites to help avoid cellular damage, including compounds such as proline, glycine betaine, and amino acids. Within each crop species there is a wide variability of tolerance to abiotic stresses, and some wild relatives may carry useful traits for enhancing the tolerance to abiotic stresses in their progeny through either traditional or biotechnological breeding. The research papers and reviews presented in this book provide an update of the scientific knowledge of crop interactions with abiotic stresses.

Physiological Responses to Abiotic and Biotic Stress in Forest Trees

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ISBN: 9783039215140 / 9783039215157 Year: Pages: 294 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-515-7 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Technology (General) --- General and Civil Engineering --- Environmental Engineering
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:15
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As sessile organisms, plants have to cope with a multitude of natural and anthropogenic forms of stress in their environment. Due to their longevity, this is of particular significance for trees. As a consequence, trees develop an orchestra of resilience and resistance mechanisms to biotic and abiotic stresses in order to support their growth and development in a constantly changing atmospheric and pedospheric environment. The objective of this Special Issue of Forests is to summarize state-of-art knowledge and report the current progress on the processes that determine the resilience and resistance of trees from different zonobiomes as well as all forms of biotic and abiotic stress from the molecular to the whole tree level.

Keywords

drought --- mid-term --- non-structural carbohydrate --- soluble sugar --- starch --- Pinus massoniana --- salinity --- Carpinus betulus --- morphological indices --- gas exchange --- osmotic adjustment substances --- antioxidant enzyme activity --- ion relationships --- Populus simonii Carr. (poplar) --- intrinsic water-use efficiency --- tree rings --- basal area increment --- long-term drought --- hydrophilic polymers --- Stockosorb --- Luquasorb --- Konjac glucomannan --- photosynthesis --- ion relation --- Fagus sylvatica L. --- Abies alba Mill. --- N nutrition --- mixed stands --- pure stands --- soil N --- water relations --- 24-epiBL application --- salt stress --- ion contents --- chloroplast ultrastructure --- photosynthesis --- Robinia pseudoacacia L. --- elevation gradient --- forest type --- growth --- leaf properties --- Pinus koraiensis Sieb. et Zucc. --- Heterobasidion parviporum --- Heterobasidion annosum --- Norway spruce --- disturbance --- water availability --- pathogen --- infection --- Carpinus turczaninowii --- salinity treatments --- ecophysiology --- photosynthetic responses --- organic osmolytes --- ion homeostasis --- antioxidant enzymes --- glutaredoxin --- subcellular localization --- expression --- tapping panel dryness --- defense response --- rubber tree --- Ca2+ signal --- drought stress --- living cell --- Moso Bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) --- plasma membrane Ca2+ channels --- signal network --- Aleppo pine --- Greece --- photosynthesis --- water potential --- ?13C --- sap flow --- canopy conductance --- climate --- molecular cloning --- functional analysis --- TCP --- DELLA --- GA-signaling pathway --- Fraxinus mandshurica Rupr. --- wood formation --- abiotic stress --- nutrition --- gene regulation --- tree --- bamboo forest --- cold stress --- physiological response --- silicon fertilization --- plant tolerance --- reactive oxygen species --- antioxidant activity --- proline --- Populus euphratica --- salt stress --- salicylic acid --- malondialdehyde --- differentially expressed genes --- n/a

Venom and Toxin as Targeted Therapy

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ISBN: 9783039211890 / 9783039211906 Year: Pages: 180 DOI: 10.3390/books978-3-03921-190-6 Language: eng
Publisher: MDPI - Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute
Subject: Science (General) --- Biology
Added to DOAB on : 2019-12-09 11:49:15
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Targeted therapy has developed significantly in the last one and half decades, prescribing specific medications for treatment of particular diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and heart disease. One of the most exciting recent developments in targeted therapies was the isolation of disease-specific molecules from natural resources, such as animal venoms and plant metabolites/toxins, for use as templates for new drug motif designs. In addition, the study of venom proteins/peptides and toxins naturally targeted mammalian receptors and demonstrated high specificity and selectivity towards defined ion channels of cell membranes. Research has also focsed intensely on receptors. The focus of this Special Issue of Toxins addressed the most recent advances using animal venoms, such as frog secretions, bee/ant venoms and plant/fungi toxins, as medicinal therapy. Recent advances in venom/toxin/immunotoxins for targeted cancer therapy and immunotherapy, along with using novel disease-specific venom-based protein/peptide/toxin and currently available FDA-approved drugs for combinationtreatments will be discussed. Finally, we included an overview of select promising toad/snake venom-based peptides/toxins potentially able to address the forthcoming challenges in this field. Both research and review articles proposing novelties or overviews, respectively, were published in this Special Issue after rigorous evaluation and revision by expert peer reviewers.

Keywords

disintegrin --- blood vessel formation --- VEGF --- antioxidant enzymes --- oxidative stress biomarkers --- bicarinalin --- antimicrobial peptide --- Helicobacter pylori --- gastric cells --- bacterial adhesion --- SEM --- atopic dermatitis (AD) --- house dust mite extract (DFE) --- 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) --- bee venom phospholipase A2 (bvPLA2) --- skin inflammation --- CD206 --- mannose receptor --- immunotoxin --- Moxetumomab pasudotox --- targeted therapy --- CD22 --- B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma --- acute lymphoblastic leukemia --- mantle cell lymphoma --- ribosome-inactivating protein --- BLF1 --- eIF4A --- MYCN --- cancer --- neuroblastoma --- apoptosis --- antimicrobial peptide (AMP) --- dermaseptin --- anuran skin secretion --- drug design --- antimicrobial activity --- anticancer activity --- antiviral activity --- Bougainvillea --- bouganin --- cancer therapy --- immunotherapy --- immunotoxins --- ribosome-inactivating proteins --- rRNA N-glycosylase activity --- VB6-845 --- orellanine --- clearance --- fungal toxin --- half-life --- toad toxins --- Chansu --- Huachansu --- cane toad --- bufadienolides --- indolealkylamines --- inflammation --- cancer --- obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) --- snake venom --- cancer --- target therapy --- snake venom --- Malaysian cobras --- N. kaouthia --- N. sumatrana --- O. hannah --- anticancer --- Apis mellifera syriaca --- bee venom --- melittin --- LC-ESI-MS --- solid phase extraction --- in vitro effects --- frog --- mass spectrometry --- molecular cloning --- bombesin-related peptide --- smooth muscle --- Bee venom --- complement system --- decay accelerating factor --- atopic dermatitis --- complement dependent cytotoxicity --- membrane attack complex --- n/a

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